U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Health and Wellness > Dental Health
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 12-01-2019, 11:09 AM
 
1,600 posts, read 859,197 times
Reputation: 5098

Advertisements

Retired and looking at dental plans. They don`t seem to cover very much. Anyone recommend plans, or is it better too just private pay?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-01-2019, 05:36 PM
 
15,660 posts, read 32,278,644 times
Reputation: 19519
Quote:
Originally Posted by marcandme View Post
Retired and looking at dental plans. They don`t seem to cover very much. Anyone recommend plans, or is it better too just private pay?
My opinion = not worth it. My husband has "dental" insurance through work, but it is practically worthless. It covers very little, you can't pick your dentist, and anything like implants or services other than basic cleanings and Xrays are usually not covered.

I would rather pick a really good dentist of my own choosing than go to some of the ones on these "discount plans." We have had some really bad work done by the discount dentists. Some of the dentists not on the plan wiil work with you and may even offer discounts for cash instead of credit.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-02-2019, 06:12 AM
 
3,156 posts, read 1,241,467 times
Reputation: 8275
This question comes up periodically; I agree with the poster above. I didn't buy it when I retired. Nearly every plan seems to restrict benefits for the first 6 months to one year, some to cleaning only. I understand that they don't want people going without insurance and then signing up when they develop expensive problems, but for those of us who have been insured and were getting regular care it's a big drawback.

They all have annual limits on what they'll pay, too, typically $1,500. So even if they cover a % of major work you'll max that out quickly.

FWIW, my dentist, who's really good, liked Delta Dental, but for the reason above I chose to "go bare".
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-02-2019, 11:41 AM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
31,501 posts, read 57,418,481 times
Reputation: 33950
Both my wife and I have the same plan through our employers and are on each other's, so we have double coverage. In the case of an implant with the extraction and bone graft, at $4,000 the insurance is a huge help. I pay $6/month, but the same premium plan bought as an individual would cost $52/month here. Other less comprehensive plans start at $26/month for individual, $122 for family. Crowns, extractions and root canals are paid at 50%. Just one root canal would justify the monthly cost. My dentist is good at planning, getting anything that might go south in the near future fixed while we're still working and have the good insurance. Most of that is old fillings from my teen years that are not holding up.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-02-2019, 04:21 PM
 
Location: on the wind
9,396 posts, read 4,139,328 times
Reputation: 31756
Quote:
Originally Posted by gypsychic View Post
My opinion = not worth it. My husband has "dental" insurance through work, but it is practically worthless. It covers very little, you can't pick your dentist, and anything like implants or services other than basic cleanings and Xrays are usually not covered.

I would rather pick a really good dentist of my own choosing than go to some of the ones on these "discount plans." We have had some really bad work done by the discount dentists. Some of the dentists not on the plan wiil work with you and may even offer discounts for cash instead of credit.
Well, so much depends on the plan. I am also retired and also have dental coverage through an employer plan. I CAN pick my dentist. The percentage they might cover for a particular provider varies, but the decision to go here or there is mine. The plan covers different percentages depending on what the service is. It's not the same coverage as for medical but it is better than a swift kick in the chops.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-03-2019, 01:13 PM
 
1,600 posts, read 859,197 times
Reputation: 5098
Thanks everyone!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-03-2019, 08:42 PM
 
5,938 posts, read 9,177,864 times
Reputation: 5236
Like all insurance, the real value is the low low prices negotiated by the insurance carrier.

This was a super low end policy I got through Obamacare- it's the same company that insures Medicaid. So the reimbursement rates are very low. It was hard to find a dentist that took that plan but I finally found a great one out in the exurbs.

For re-setting a crown the rate was something like $40 as opposed to $125 retail. I will confess I kicked in a little under the table.

My latest challenge is I need an apioectomy. Which is $580 at my favorite dental school. But apparently $3-400 at a local oral surgeon. If I can find one to take my plan. I'm wondering if that is too good to be true.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-18-2019, 08:49 PM
 
8,788 posts, read 7,808,259 times
Reputation: 7180
Find a plan that has your dentist in-network. Most plans have search tools you can use before you apply for coverage.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-18-2019, 09:11 PM
 
2,613 posts, read 893,894 times
Reputation: 3618
My experience has been that if you are an employee of a large company that has a good policy, you will have decent choices to select a suitable dentist and the coverage will be decent but mostly cover the less expensive procedures with all maintenance visits fully covered.

When finding your own insurance as an individual or family, it will hardly be worth it and cover only 80% of maintenance visits with very small percentages of crowns, filling or other major work. You will be hard pressed to find dentists who accept the lower tier insurance and quite often, they opt out of these plans once their practice grows. Personally I found it less expensive to find a good dentist and to pay as needed.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 03:13 PM
 
141 posts, read 17,678 times
Reputation: 87
If you cannot find the insurance that cover major treatments then there is no need for it. Usually for older people the range of insurance is always low because they know that there will be costly treatments in old age.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Health and Wellness > Dental Health
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top