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Old 04-28-2020, 03:16 PM
 
1,984 posts, read 1,038,468 times
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First off. Please advise every child and adult you know to wash/floss their teeth and most importantly to visit a dentist at least twice a year for checkups. Get the fillings and cleanings if necessary, but just stay away from bridge work if at all possible. For me, c. 1998 decided to get bridge work done on two separate areas of my mouth. To replace two missing teeth. One of the bridges lasted for 16 years before coming loose and eventually falling out. The other bridge, now going on over 20 years in place is in drastic need for replacement. As several infections over the years have caused one of the teeth in the bridge to die, causing damage to the underlying bone.

So, went to a dental office for some cleaning before a vacation. They took x-rays, came back and said dentist would like to discuss problem with damaged bridge. Told me the consultant dentist would be in the office the following week and would recommend to speak with him. I made my appt. and proceeded into consultation with the doctor. He took a c scan and said there is a lesion on the bone underneath the bridge. Some bone grafting would be required to provide enough bone area to accommodate dental implants in the future. It will take approx. 3-4 months for bone graft to integrate with existing bone.

My qsts are for those who have gone through similar procedures involving bone grafts on lower jaw area :

What changes to diet did you have to make while bone graft heals?, Did you have to take time off work ?, Can you return to somewhat regular activities like exercise , even talking after the first couple of weeks?, & lastly, how severe was the process overall?. I have somewhat committed to going ahead with the bone grafting as both dentists have told me to not do so would result in serious bone damage , even jaw bone breakage down the road.

Thanks in advance for any input.
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Old 04-28-2020, 03:28 PM
 
Location: 49th parallel
3,269 posts, read 1,847,288 times
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Every person is different, but this is a procedure that has been done thousands of times and is very safe. You will have to eat soft food while the graft heals, but really there is nothing much to it. If your jaw aches terribly you might want to take a day or so off work, but many people don't. Really, it's not that hard on the body. My husband had grafts and hardly noticed, other than the soft food thing and the achy jaw for a few days.

If your dentist has recommended using your own bone from another part of your jaw, that is a bit more serious and involves two surgeries,not just one. Most dentists don't do that if they don't have to. They use prepared bone graft from another source. It's almost like a powder and gets inserted into the hole where the implant will ultimately be put, then the gum area is closed up and you go home and wait until it heals. Drink smoothies to your heart's content!
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Old 05-04-2020, 02:02 PM
 
1,984 posts, read 1,038,468 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ndcairngorm View Post
Every person is different, but this is a procedure that has been done thousands of times and is very safe. You will have to eat soft food while the graft heals, but really there is nothing much to it. If your jaw aches terribly you might want to take a day or so off work, but many people don't. Really, it's not that hard on the body. My husband had grafts and hardly noticed, other than the soft food thing and the achy jaw for a few days.

If your dentist has recommended using your own bone from another part of your jaw, that is a bit more serious and involves two surgeries,not just one. Most dentists don't do that if they don't have to. They use prepared bone graft from another source. It's almost like a powder and gets inserted into the hole where the implant will ultimately be put, then the gum area is closed up and you go home and wait until it heals. Drink smoothies to your heart's content!
So, it does sound similar to what I have planned next month. I guess something as unusual as a dental bone graft, does set off all sorts of alarm bells for the first time patient. This initial bone graft will be a test to see if I wish to continue with another bone graft on my upper right jaw, a sinus lift they call it. My whole face structure is so small, I must be extra careful to ensure no additional problems are added to my dental health for the years ahead. For now I am missing two teeth on upper right jaw, close enough to the front of the mouth to affect my smile just a bit. I have mastered this modified smile to conceal the gaps.

What is funny is how even before the dentists recommended bone grafts and soft food etc., I had already moved onto softer foods in my daily diet. The few cigarettes I take will be reduced dramatically too. As long as I can have my nightly glass of wine , after the healing process is underway, I can see no real inconvenience with this procedure. The success rate is high, between 95% - 98%.

As for what source of bone will be used ?. Not my own but probably from a cadaver or a bovine source.
I have almost fully committed to the operation now. Just hoping they are open for business next June. Here in California, a few more weeks of lockdowns are in effect. If left unattended, the dentist mentioned it could lead to jawbone breakage , which is something I can't afford to have happen on a personal or financial basis.

Thank you so much for your clear and concise reply to my OP. It helps me put the whole procedure in perspective. As someone who does not visit doctors/dentists very often, so difficult to know for certain what is entailed in any given procedure.
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Old 05-19-2020, 06:51 AM
 
4,339 posts, read 1,898,706 times
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Cigarettes? Ack! I'm sure your dentist would advise you to quit.

I've had bone grafts for implants- 3 different times, 5 implants total. They may have been smaller quantities than what you're getting but I had zero issue with any of them. I never needed anything stronger than Tylenol after the anaesthetic wore off even though he gave me a prescription for opioids each time. Any time I get X-rayed the dentist marvels at how well the bone graft and the implants have integrated into my own tissue- and I'm 67 so being older doesn't necessarily hurt your chances for success.

Yes, they're from cadavers. It always annoyed me that the blood bank deferred me for 6 months after getting a bone graft because of that. I'm sure that whatever they do to process the donated bone tissue would kill anything bad.
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Old 05-19-2020, 04:11 PM
Status: "Enjoying the winter" (set 4 days ago)
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
33,884 posts, read 61,639,190 times
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I agree that no two people will be exactly the same. I have had 4 in all, the last two together. I did not ever use the heavy duty pain killers prescribed, I just managed with Tylenol in every case. I did take off time from work but only on the afternoons of the extraction and bone graft. I was always back to work the next day. The only diet change after the first two days of applesauce, jello and yogurt was avoiding really hard foods like crusty bread, cornnuts or hard candy, and eating on the other side as much as possible.

Not an issue for me but the disclaimer I signed also mentioned no smoking for two weeks or it could fail. Mine were all toward the back, so easier to avoid chewing there. Exercise and all other aspects of life went on as normal the next day, it just wasn't that big a deal even for the two next to each other. I would guess that if this were toward the front it would be a lot more difficult and more diet issues.
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Old 08-02-2020, 03:44 AM
 
4,452 posts, read 2,168,093 times
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A bone graft and a sinus lift are two very different things. You need to ask a lot of questions of your dentist so that you understand what you're getting into.
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