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Old 09-08-2020, 09:52 PM
 
44 posts, read 30,349 times
Reputation: 121

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Quote:
Originally Posted by LKJ1988 View Post
Implants would buy me a new C8 Vette so they are out. My sis had to have all her teeth pulled as she threw up a lot thanks to tummy probs and went without any teeth for years and ate fine without them. She went too long she said before she got her fake teeth and never learned to like them and did without and i am sure i will do the same and save tons of money honey. Sure as heck not paying 30 k or more implants.

That is true. Implants can be very expensive. Partials or complete dentures can be pretty inexpensive though especially if you have a dental school near you. I remember at my dental school it was 300 or 400 dollars for a denture. Here in California, Medical/Dentical covers dentures as long as you are completely edentulous (have no teeth) on either the top or bottom. Well, I hope you save tons of money and get some teeth! Good luck.

-Dr. S
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Old 09-08-2020, 10:09 PM
 
44 posts, read 30,349 times
Reputation: 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZgarden View Post
Hi there Doc;

I grind my teeth at night and have to wear a nightgard when I sleep. It causes me to have a very dry mouth and I usually take it out around 2 AM and go without. If i do not wear it, my right TMJ gives me ear pain so I wonder what else there is I can do? Went to an ENT once. He had no help for me.

Although it can be quite expensive, getting an orthotic device might work for you. You can find a TMJ specialist in your area that might be familiar with this. The way it works is that they put a machine on your jaw that makes your jaw muscles spasm and then relax completely. They then record your jaw position at its most relaxed state. Then they fit you with a device that is often pretty slim and comfortable. This way your mouth should remain closed and with the slimmer profile, it can theoretically reduce your dry mouth.

Another option for you is to use cheaper over the counter nightguards to see if they work better for you.

Even another option could be to use products that help with dry mouth. A new product that came out a few years ago is Xylimelts. It can be placed on your gums and it helps with dry mouth while your asleep. There are other products for dry mouth as well that could help.
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Old 09-08-2020, 10:16 PM
 
44 posts, read 30,349 times
Reputation: 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoNative34 View Post
Do you recommend sugarless gum for your patients who chew gum?

It's funny, no patient has asked me that in the many years I've worked, but I definitely have an opinion on this. Sugar-free or sugar-less gum is better than ones with some other types of gum on the market, but better than that is xylitol gum. Xylitol is a real sugar that many, many studies have shown to help reduce the number of cavities if taken regularly for more than 6 months. It's fantastic. If you want more information about it, this website has a good amount of information about xylitol in general: https://www.xylitolpreventscavities.com/
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Old 09-13-2020, 08:55 AM
 
5,066 posts, read 5,397,811 times
Reputation: 11538
I keep going back and forth about going to have my teeth cleaned. I was due in March. With the WHO saying not to go for non-emergency issues, I am wondering if they still holds. I'd really like to get my teeth cleaned but not interested in getting sick from such close proximity to others.

Go or not go? Thanks, and thanks for offering your expertise.
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Old 09-13-2020, 09:26 AM
 
18,588 posts, read 12,202,238 times
Reputation: 6271
Quote:
Originally Posted by brava4 View Post
I keep going back and forth about going to have my teeth cleaned. I was due in March. With the WHO saying not to go for non-emergency issues, I am wondering if they still holds. I'd really like to get my teeth cleaned but not interested in getting sick from such close proximity to others.

Go or not go? Thanks, and thanks for offering your expertise.
Just wait nate.
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Old 09-14-2020, 01:28 PM
 
Location: Southern California
8,996 posts, read 10,157,676 times
Reputation: 10023
Hi Dr. S & thanks a lot for helping. Yes, trying my best to stay home more due to COVID. If you can please answer these questions, I'd greatly appreciate it:

1) What can a person do at home themselves if they know they have a cavity? My 82-yr old mother has one, but it's not bothering her yet. She's been trying to chew her food on the opposite side from the cavity so as not to aggravate it. She rinses her mouth w/ water to cut down on build-up, etc.

2) I bought a little "dental cleaning kit" that they sell at Target w/ the picks & round mirror because I'm sure a teeth cleaning's needed by now, but it's not bad. I'm trying to do the tedious work of scraping out the built-on tarter between certain teeth. Is there something (preferably all-natural) I can use/buy that dissolves or at least softens tarter? Anything else I can do so the build-up doesn't get so severe?

3) Re: upper implants, if a person needs it for the entire upper, is it in a U-shape OR does there have to be that plate part that covers the whole roof of the mouth too? (Hopefully, it's not the latter since it's snap-on procedure.)
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Old 09-14-2020, 03:18 PM
 
Location: USA
911 posts, read 544,378 times
Reputation: 3456
I have a question about dental procedures following a joint replacement. I hear differing opinions from orthopedic surgeons. One I talked to said antibiotics were only required for a dental procedure for the first 2 years following a joint replacement, while another told me he recommends taking antibiotics prior to any dental procedure (esp. a cleaning) for the rest of my life. While my Orthodontist said that he thinks antibiotics prior to dental work isn't necessary, and my dentist said he'd do it if I asked for it, but was also on the fence about it. My research revealed that the ADA's most recent stance is that antibiotics are not necessary for dental work following a joint replacement, whereas the AOA still recommends the use of prophylactic antibiotics. This is very confusing for the patient.

What is your stance on prophylactic antibiotics for dental work for patients with joint replacements?
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Old 09-14-2020, 03:30 PM
 
Location: equator
6,157 posts, read 2,742,897 times
Reputation: 14905
How nice to offer advice, Doc!

I have joint replacements. At the time of the surgery, the dentist said to let every dentist/doctor know I have artificial joints, due to the risk of infection heading straight to the joint.

Is this forever, or just for a limited time?
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Old 09-15-2020, 06:26 AM
 
4 posts, read 1,242 times
Reputation: 10
I lost my four tooth in accedent and i feel very bad for that can you suugest me what i do ,i feel my dispoint
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Old 09-15-2020, 09:05 AM
Status: "No longer very optimistic." (set 18 days ago)
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
41,175 posts, read 50,955,458 times
Reputation: 71176
My husband is 70. He goes to the dentist twice a year, and has normal dental hygiene. He is going today, actually. In the past few months his teeth look very discolored, especially between the teeth. They look brown. The only thing that has changed in his habits is he’s been taking bactrim for an infection.
I’m wondering if whitening toothpaste makes a difference? He will be discussing tooth whitening with the dentist.
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