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Old 10-23-2020, 07:50 PM
 
44 posts, read 30,414 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CynthiaLDavis View Post
Thank you for adding me.

I'm not sure if this is the right forum or not. If not I apologize and any direction would be greatly appreciated. I apologize in advance for how long winded this is.

In the end of July I had 1 extraction. (Tooth 29). For an extraction it was extremely painful for a couple of days, then a growth grew out of the extraction site.

On day 4 after the extraction I was sitting in my backyard and I turned to my spouse and said, "I think I'm going to be sick" and i started walking back to the house. A couple steps in I realized I wasn't going to make it. My legs and arms felt so heavy, I had trouble catching my breath, it sounded like sound was underwater, everything started to tunnel, I was Sweeting profusely. I lowered myself to the ground because I knew if not I would fall. I have no idea how long I sat until my senses came back. 5-10 minutes? I made an appointment with my doctor who figured it was caused by pain and not eating properly, but decided to run tests to confirm. Discovered it was an angina attack. Never had heart issues previously, my blood pressure is in the normal range, normal high for cholesterol, 40 years old. Not really a candidate for heart disease. Waiting for cardiologist appointment now.

In September a dentist discovered the growth was caused by gauze that was left in my gums during the extraction 5 weeks earlier. He removed the gauze scraped the bone and sent me to a specialist. Exposed bone in my mouth. Surgery November 12 to remove the infection.

14 days after the gauze removal I was woken up with extreme pain in my RLQ abdomen. Went to the hospital they were convinced it was appendicitis. Low grade fever, white blood count of 14,000. Went for a CT scan turns out it was masteric lymphadenitis. No virus before to cause this.

This entire time, I'm extremely tired, general feeling of unwell, intermittent fever.

My question to you, is there a bacteria that could cause all this from my mouth? Is there something I should be checking for or a test I should be asking for. I've tried mentioning to my doctor that I think it's all related because I was perfectly healthy prior to the gauze being left. She said I would be much sicker if it was sepsis. (I would think she is right.) But is there any other type of infection or bacterium that could cause this?

If you stayed with me up to the end Thank you. And thanks for any advice or direction.

It seems like a quite an experience you had. First of all, sorry that you had to go through all that. I know how hard dental pain can be, and that coupled with all the other things you mentioned is tough. There are all sorts of bacteria in the mouth that can be problematic particularly if a decent amount of it got into your blood stream to cause sepsis. If this happened, I believe your reaction would be even worse than what you experienced. On top of that, this circumstance, while definitely possible in dentistry, it is quite rare.

While there may be a way that this is all connected, my opinion is that it is more likely not directly related. I say directly because abdominal issues can occur after dental visits when a patient is taking stronger pain medications for example that can cause an upset stomach. Your case is a little more unique but it is still unlikely that the gauze directly caused swollen lymph nodes in your abdomen. Direct issues would more likely cause submandibular, submental, or cervical lymph nodes to be swollen.

Visiting a cardiologist is definitely a wise move at this point. The heart is more connected to the oral cavity than most people think. I hope you find the relief you need and it all works out. I also hope that I was of some help.
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Old 10-23-2020, 07:56 PM
 
44 posts, read 30,414 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JL View Post
When my endodontist and periodontist discovered a crack in my tooth...they couldn’t give me an answer if tooth was infected or nerve infected nerve ... my periodontist thought it was ok to just get a crown, but advised me to see endodontist who wasn’t sure either but suggested I get root canal which I did. I kinda regret not waiting or getting 2nd opinion

How come they can’t come to a definitive conclusion? I’m beginning to think the endodontist wanted to get my $1,600 that day.
Dentistry has strong subjective elements to it as well. When we check to see if a tooth needs a root canal, we look at a few things such as history of pain, type of pain, time of pain, sensitivity to hot, sensitivity to cold, sensitivity when biting/chewing, we check if an infection is present in the bone underneath the tooth, we look for large cavities, and few other things we can do. Determination of the necessity for a root canal is largly objective. With that said, sometimes these measures are not 100% reliable. That's when subjectivity comes into play and experience is key. This also means that two dentists/endodontists might disagree on the treatment for the same tooth.
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Old 10-23-2020, 07:57 PM
 
44 posts, read 30,414 times
Reputation: 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by NORTY FLATZ View Post
Last time I asked "any" question, I got 5 days in banned camp. (Go figure...)

So, I guess I don't have ANY questions for you. (Too bad too, as I have some doozies!)

I'm not sure what this means. Why would you get banned for asking me a question? Sorry, I'm confused.
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Old 10-23-2020, 08:07 PM
 
44 posts, read 30,414 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Demolitionman2 View Post
What is a dental cyst indicative of regarding the tooth it corresponds to? I mean cyst, NOT abscess. Thank you for your answer...

I'm going to copy paste someone else's indications here because it explains it much better than I ever could.

A) Some form because of the improper way a tooth-teeth have grown and positioned themselves in the mouth, others because of the abnormal way a tooth has developed

B) A root canal which has failed naturally or as a result of a botched procedure

C) Because of a genetic syndrome (Gorlin’s syndrome), if this is the case there will be other symptoms involved

D) Cysts can form around the crowns (and roots) of buried teeth. Wisdom teeth that are impacted (buried) are common causes for cyst formation

E) Because the teeth that are being affected by a cyst have died (trauma or infection), the root of the teeth was not treated or was treated incorrectly.

Source: https://westcoastinternational.com/dental-cysts.html
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Old 10-23-2020, 08:26 PM
 
44 posts, read 30,414 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rstevens62 View Post
Here is a question...Ive had a lower rear tooth crack off years ago, but never did anything about it, because it never hurt and unfortunately dental is not included in my health insurance...


I dont really understand how it did NOT hurt for so long, as the pulp and nerve have been exposed all this time, (about half the tooth is broke off), it started hurting about a month ago, Ive been sealing it with Dentemp and that has worked well, pain subsides as soon I apply the Dentemp.



Otherwise, I brush, floss, and use antiseptic mouthwash after I eat, and in the morning.


Last night this tooth started THROBBING in pain, I put some 'DENTEMP' on it, attempting to seal the tooth again, but for some reason, it didnt work this time...The only thing that really stopped the pain was to CONSTANTLY take small sips of ice water, numbing the tooth briefly...seriously, this went on from 11:30pm to around 6am!!


I dont think its infected, as it didnt hurt when I woke up this morning, but I realize Im going to have to get this tooth extracted within the next few days!


Why would the Dentemp sealing work for so long...and then not work all the sudden? I believe Dentemp has clove or Eugeonol oil in it, I know that is very powerful numbing agent...maybe the pulp/nerve was just irritated and even the Dentemp sealing wouldnt stop the pain...??


Thank you for your time.

This is a common misconception amongst dental patients. Pain and infections do not go hand in hand. A patient can have no pain for years while an active infection is present near the tooth's root tip. Sometimes the patient's tooth has had it's nerves completely obliterated by bacteria, making the tooth essentially dead, and not able to feel any pain. This is most likely what happened to you. Even though there is no pain, bacteria is still making its way through your tooth and into the bone surround the tooth. The pain that people feel after a long period of time with no pain is often from the pressure of the bacterial infection pressing again surrounding tissue. When you plug it up with something with sedative properties like eugenol, that pathway of bacteria leading into your infection site is blocked and your body's natural defenses take over and handle some of that infection. If plugging it doesn't work, that means that the infection is essentially too big and winning and/or there is a new pathway for bacteria to enter into the infection site (often through the gums). That's the layman version, but it's really important to know that just because you don't have pain doesn't mean you don't need treatment ASAP.

My suggestion to you is to visit a dentist, insurance or not.
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Old 10-24-2020, 12:27 AM
 
20,945 posts, read 6,001,542 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stresslessdds View Post
This is a common misconception amongst dental patients. Pain and infections do not go hand in hand. A patient can have no pain for years while an active infection is present near the tooth's root tip. Sometimes the patient's tooth has had it's nerves completely obliterated by bacteria, making the tooth essentially dead, and not able to feel any pain. This is most likely what happened to you. Even though there is no pain, bacteria is still making its way through your tooth and into the bone surround the tooth. The pain that people feel after a long period of time with no pain is often from the pressure of the bacterial infection pressing again surrounding tissue. When you plug it up with something with sedative properties like eugenol, that pathway of bacteria leading into your infection site is blocked and your body's natural defenses take over and handle some of that infection. If plugging it doesn't work, that means that the infection is essentially too big and winning and/or there is a new pathway for bacteria to enter into the infection site (often through the gums). That's the layman version, but it's really important to know that just because you don't have pain doesn't mean you don't need treatment ASAP.

My suggestion to you is to visit a dentist, insurance or not.
I have an appt monday morning at 730 for extraction...I have had infections in teeth before, they were treated with antibiotics and the pain stopped a couple days after starting the antibiotics, a couple times, my face swelled up quite a bit.



You are right, I was under the impression that tooth pain usually equals infection, its interesting to know that is not always the case.
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Old 10-24-2020, 12:44 AM
 
Location: Avignon, France
9,660 posts, read 5,394,655 times
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What is the price of asparagus by the foot?
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Old 10-24-2020, 10:00 AM
 
44 posts, read 30,414 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sydney123 View Post
What is the price of asparagus by the foot?
I did say ask me anything. In dentistry we don't use the imperial system for measurement but rather the metric system. I know it's about $1.23/meter. I am too lazy to convert that to feet.

However, I do know that the cost of asparagus by A foot is always the same price regardless of whose feet the asparagus is next to.
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Old 10-24-2020, 10:10 AM
 
44 posts, read 30,414 times
Reputation: 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by rstevens62 View Post
I have an appt monday morning at 730 for extraction...I have had infections in teeth before, they were treated with antibiotics and the pain stopped a couple days after starting the antibiotics, a couple times, my face swelled up quite a bit.



You are right, I was under the impression that tooth pain usually equals infection, its interesting to know that is not always the case.
If your face swells up, you absolutely need antibiotics. Another misconception that is good to know is that antibiotics, while helpful, do not get rid dental infections. It just helps to temporarily win the fight against the bacteria and often temporarily reduce the pain that you may have. The real way to get rid of the infection is by treating the source of it which is the tooth. We do this by either a root canal if possible or an extraction. Extracting your tooth, in your case, would take away the reason the infection is there.
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Old 10-27-2020, 01:33 PM
 
20,945 posts, read 6,001,542 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stresslessdds View Post
If your face swells up, you absolutely need antibiotics. Another misconception that is good to know is that antibiotics, while helpful, do not get rid dental infections. It just helps to temporarily win the fight against the bacteria and often temporarily reduce the pain that you may have. The real way to get rid of the infection is by treating the source of it which is the tooth. We do this by either a root canal if possible or an extraction. Extracting your tooth, in your case, would take away the reason the infection is there.
Ive had several teeth reach the point where my face swelled up over the years, its been many years ago though, this tooth was just hurting pretty bad, it actually brought tears to my eyes it hurt so bad! Seems like the pain would come and go, last about 10-15 hours and then subside for another 10-12 hours and then start hurting again.


I did find that constantly taking small sips of ice water and holding the water on the tooth inside my mouth quickly stopped the pain, although it only lasted a couple minutes and the pain would come back, I kept a big cup of ice water nearby for a couple days, I was able to work during this, I just had to always keep that ice water nearby!


THe dentist I saw told me, 99% of the time when a broken tooth like mine is hurting, its infection that is causing the pain, (not so much the nerve or pulp being exposed). But I really do not understand that, because I was using antiseptic mouthwash, I also used hydrogen peroxide as a mouth wash...shouldnt this have killed any infection/bacteria?


What doesnt make sense, if an infection in a broken tooth starts because the pulp is exposed, (meaning bacteria can enter)...then why would the hydrogen peroxide not be able to enter as well, to kill the infection?
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