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Old 10-27-2020, 02:20 PM
 
Location: on the wind
13,105 posts, read 6,616,991 times
Reputation: 43190

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Quote:
Originally Posted by rstevens62 View Post
But I really do not understand that, because I was using antiseptic mouthwash, I also used hydrogen peroxide as a mouth wash...shouldnt this have killed any infection/bacteria?


What doesnt make sense, if an infection in a broken tooth starts because the pulp is exposed, (meaning bacteria can enter)...then why would the hydrogen peroxide not be able to enter as well, to kill the infection?
What's not to understand? Swishing the inside of your mouth with an antiseptic for a couple of minutes won't necessarily penetrate enough to reach a buried infection. Sure, teeth are somewhat porous but they're not THAT porous! Antibiotics and antiseptics fight infections in different ways. Antiseptics slow or stop microbial activity or growth but don't necessarily kill the organisms outright. Antibiotics actually kill bacterial organisms. Of course, if whatever is causing the infection isn't a bacteria, an antibiotic won't be effective.
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Old 10-27-2020, 11:29 PM
 
21,224 posts, read 6,145,260 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Parnassia View Post
What's not to understand? Swishing the inside of your mouth with an antiseptic for a couple of minutes won't necessarily penetrate enough to reach a buried infection. Sure, teeth are somewhat porous but they're not THAT porous! Antibiotics and antiseptics fight infections in different ways. Antiseptics slow or stop microbial activity or growth but don't necessarily kill the organisms outright. Antibiotics actually kill bacterial organisms. Of course, if whatever is causing the infection isn't a bacteria, an antibiotic won't be effective.
Well, my thinking on that was...if bacteria somehow managed to get inside of the broken tooth, and it become infected as a result, the peroxide or antiseptic mouthwash would have the same access to the tooth that the bacteria did when it was first infected...But presume you will tell me this is wrong?
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Old 10-28-2020, 09:36 AM
 
44 posts, read 33,871 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rstevens62 View Post
Well, my thinking on that was...if bacteria somehow managed to get inside of the broken tooth, and it become infected as a result, the peroxide or antiseptic mouthwash would have the same access to the tooth that the bacteria did when it was first infected...But presume you will tell me this is wrong?

I understand your thought process here, but your presumption was correct in that this is incorrect. First, think of your root tip as the most narrow funnel that you can think of. Technically both mouthwash and bacteria have the same access to this funnel, however there are 3 things helping the bacteria go through this funnel. The first is time. Because the funnel is so small, lots of time is needed for any significant amount of anything to go through it. Luckily for bacteria, they are always in your mouth unlike mouthwash. Secondly is close proximity. The bacteria is originating from the same tooth where the infection has occurred so it's always next to this "funnel". Finally, and most importantly, bacteria can pass through this "funnel" and multiply in large numbers whereas mouthwash cannot. There are other reasons as well that are too complicated to discuss. I hope that helps.

-Dr S.
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Old 10-28-2020, 01:59 PM
 
9,667 posts, read 9,923,504 times
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I had a root canal on a molar about 30 years ago. For many years, I just had a filling and then about a dozen years ago, that filling was replaced with a crown. No problem all of these years until a recent infection. I went to 2 endodentists. The first one said she couldn't tell what was wrong just from the x-ray. She thought there was a problem with one of the roots and saw something suspicious on a second root, but wouldn't know until she started to retreat the first root. The second endodentist said it's possible that there is a remnant left from a baby tooth or old root material and he also spoke about the second root and I didn't understand what he said. He recommended extracting the tooth. The antibiotic got rid of the infection but that tooth is still sensitive. I would like to save the tooth but the second endodentist said I could go through the expense and agony of a retreatment but would still end up having the tooth extracted.

I am bewildered. How can there be a piece of baby tooth or old root left after 30 years and no one noticed? I don't really understand what is going on?

BTW, I am the world's worst dental patient and dentists just don't have the patience for me.
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Old 10-28-2020, 11:40 PM
 
9 posts, read 2,530 times
Reputation: 23
What is the best remedy and medician for teeth to instant pain relief?
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Old 10-29-2020, 01:38 PM
 
226 posts, read 341,957 times
Reputation: 582
What is the average airspeed of an unladen swallow?

Seriously though, I need a tooth crowned and I'm just wondering what effect that will have on me donating plasma? Let's assume my dentist will use a local anesthetic

Thanks Doc
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Old 10-31-2020, 07:29 PM
 
Location: home state of Myrtle Beach!
6,425 posts, read 20,367,923 times
Reputation: 3639
When I've had cavities filled in the past (I need one now) the description includes the word surface and sometimes a filing consists of 1, 2 or more surfaces on the same tooth, I believe. Can you explain what this means?

Also, in zip code 296 how much should a 1 surface filling cost? I'm uninsured. Cost is a concern.
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Old 11-01-2020, 08:24 AM
 
4,442 posts, read 1,999,119 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StcLurker View Post
What is the average airspeed of an unladen swallow?

Seriously though, I need a tooth crowned and I'm just wondering what effect that will have on me donating plasma? Let's assume my dentist will use a local anesthetic
That's more of a question for the blood bank. They'll defer you if you're taking an antibiotic for an infection (or potential infection). The only time I've been deferred for dental work is when I got bone grafts for implants because the bones come from cadavers.
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Old 11-01-2020, 08:27 AM
 
Location: Florida
13,720 posts, read 6,814,093 times
Reputation: 28087
I broke off part of a tooth - had to have a crown and a root canal. Now I am having discomfort in that same tooth. The endodontist said I may need to have that tooth removed! What is up with that? I thought a root canal meant I would not have any pain in the tooth ever again.

My regular dentist said it's possible the endo didn't remove all the "canals". I spent $3K between the root canal and the crown and I'm not removing the tooth.

Should I get a second opinion from a different endodontist in the original guy's office or a different practice entirely?
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Old 11-01-2020, 02:28 PM
 
Location: on the wind
13,105 posts, read 6,616,991 times
Reputation: 43190
Quote:
Originally Posted by myrc60 View Post
When I've had cavities filled in the past (I need one now) the description includes the word surface and sometimes a filing consists of 1, 2 or more surfaces on the same tooth, I believe. Can you explain what this means?

Also, in zip code 296 how much should a 1 surface filling cost? I'm uninsured. Cost is a concern.
Your teeth are three dimensional and they are divided into "surfaces". For example. the lingual surface refers to the side of a tooth that faces your tongue. One larger cavity on a tooth could involve more than one surface so the filling would extend to more than one as well.

A 2 second Google search found this:

https://www.dentalcare.com/en-us/pro...s-of-the-teeth

No idea what a filling should cost. Call a dentist there and ask what they charge if you don't have insurance. They may charge a different rate and it won't necessarily be lower with insurance.

Sorry to wade in on the OP's offer to help posters. I'm sure we're lucky to have you and your offer is very kind! Its just that some of the answers to these questions are so basic they are really easy to find if you expend a little effort.

Last edited by Parnassia; 11-01-2020 at 02:38 PM..
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