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Old 02-20-2012, 06:14 PM
 
11 posts, read 18,871 times
Reputation: 14

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Hello All,

First, let me apologize for the long post and I will try to remember to apologize after. I'm finally taking a leap of faith by relocating to Denver in June. I will not have a job lined up yet, however I have a source of income and a year's worth of savings.
I am legally blind and because I'm visually challanged it willl take at least a month to find a neighborhood that is safe, affordalbe, and transit friendly. So I found an extended stay hotel the address is 14095 E. Evans Ave in Aurora,Co 80014 and I was wondering if that is a good area to stay.
I would rather find an apt. and not have to use that first $1100 for the hotel stay. I've also contacted a relocation company and their recommendations are all SE Denver, here are the addresses:
Hampden Heights Apts.
8405 E. Hampden Ave
Denver, CO 80231
Kennedy Ridge Apts
10700 E. Dartmouth
Denver, CO 80014
Creekside Apt.
5250 Cherry Creek S. Dr
Denver, CO 80246
Glenbrook Apts
9999 E. Yale Ave
Denver, CO 80231

Has anyone lived or still lives in these apartments, I will be renting for a year and then I will buy my very first house.

Any other recommendations or advice is greatly needed and appriciated.

Thank You,
PS I truly apologize for the longest post you might of ever read.
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Old 02-20-2012, 07:12 PM
 
5,089 posts, read 14,768,384 times
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I want to say first that I am disabled and I am eligible for use of the disabled bus pick up/return to my house. Every time I bring up the issue of the paratransit buses to other disabled people, they get angry and I never get any thanks and I am just ignored. I have no idea of the problem with these people. Maybe they think I am patronizing them--I am only giving them good information. If you are certified for the service. It does not mean you have to use it.

Our service in this area is called Access-a-Ride http://www.rtd-denver.com/accessARide.shtml (broken link) and is run by the Public transit agency, RTD, http://www.rtd-denver.com/index.shtml

It is a very important consideration is your are disabled or your disability is being blind because the service can only be available if you live within 3/4 of a mile of a fixed transit route and it is strictly enforced. It does not meant to extend public transit to the disabled but to provide close to what is available.

It is even more important when you realize that when you get qualified, you get a free pass on all buses and trains. The access ride does cost and is usually $4.50 per one way trip which is twice the regular bus fare. That is because the service is expensive and in high demand. So, it is known that the disabled can, at times, navigate the public transit system. In addition, the certified disabled gets subsidized service for cab fare when there is an immediate need because the Access-a-Ride requires a day before reservation.

This service is not the same as the discount fare service for the elderly, the disabled and those on Medicare http://www.rtd-denver.com/DiscountFares.shtml Access-a-Ride is for those who cannot ambulate to a fixed route stop and requires an onsite evaluation from Easter Seals, the contracted certifying authority.

So, if you looking for a place to live, be sure that it is within the ADA boundaries. It is not shown on their online map (Why? I do not know but I am going to find out). It is available on an internal system map that is no longer published Denver | Interactive System Map You will see a Pink ADA boundary line. The boundary is very irregular so you must look carefully. Better yet call them before moving:

Larry Buter
RTD Manager,
303-299-2152

Carolyn Conover
Paratransit Services RTD Senior Manager, Contracted Services
303-299-2551

I am a frequent public transit user and know the system. I have looked at all your selections and I really do not like any of them. They appear to be within the ADA Boundaries. However, they seem to be so isolated. Most have one bus and one location has two bus routes available. Most are secondary bus routes. What I mean is that a primary main bus route runs with more frequency, seven days a week from early morning to late at night and usually on the main roads such as Broadway, Federal, Sheridan, Wadsworth--that is the type of bus you should be seeking. In addition, I would look more at transit/transfer centers http://www.rtd-denver.com/TransitCenters.shtml where multiple buses come together as that will give you much better service.

This relocation company does not have the capacity to understand needs of the disabled, those with limited mobility and those who must rely on public transit. They have not idea of a walkable lifestyle where a car is not the center of life. They only suggested these apartments in the southeast because they think they are safest and have bus nearby.

Denver is a relatively safe city and there are much better choices, in the city and the suburbs, than these apartment. I would pick a place to live, having limited mobility like myself and relying on public transit to be walkable with some interesting places, restaurants and basic shopping nearby and not so isolated. Obviously, it depends on your budget but I would pick apartments more in denser areas of Denver or parts of the suburbs that are safe and are walkable and with better and more transit options.

Your extended stay motel is safe but it stinks-again too isolated. There is no bus service nearby. I would pick an extended stay hotel on the Southeast Rail Line, right next to a station, then you can easily get around. See this past post of mine Visiting Denver... tips?

My post is much bigger than yours!

Livecontent

Last edited by livecontent; 02-20-2012 at 08:07 PM..
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Old 02-21-2012, 01:10 AM
 
11 posts, read 18,871 times
Reputation: 14
Hello LiveContent,

I want to thank you for the quick response also for the information about the access bus, where I'm from its MetroLift basically it works the same way. I have no qualms about using the access buses since I use them when I need to. I already contacted rtd asking about the disability rate for the regular transit and all I need is a letter from the specialist stating I'm legally blind which I already have.
However, I was disappointed with the info about the hotel and apts. I guess I'll keep looking for a hotel. I don't have any mobility and orientation training yet so finding an apt. or hotel and an company to work in the same area in a new city and state with no family or friends around will be a bit trick. Better get back to research.
thank You very much.

Looking forward to my new life even if tis a bit scary in the process.
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Old 02-21-2012, 07:40 AM
 
Location: Denver, CO
5,610 posts, read 22,395,028 times
Reputation: 5420
I'm familiar with all four of those apartment complexes, and toured three of them when I was looking at apartments in 2010. They all suck. Then again, that's pretty much what you get for rent in the $500-$600 range. Read the apartment reviews. True, EVERY apartment complex, even "luxury apartments" has bad reviews, but it's important to pay attention to the TYPES of problems people are complaining about-- what are the recurring themes? For example, if people are complaining that the staff is rude, that they didn't get their rent deposit back, that parking is tight, that their rent went up, or they can hear their neighborhoods stomping upstairs (duh-- if you're noise sensitive live on the floor), you know it's a pretty good place to live. However read the reviews on those places and the recurring themes are vandalism, cops over all the time, loud & obnoxious neighbors, bedbugs, etc. If you could afford a place in the $700-800 range you'd get a much nicer apartment. I'd also look at condos rented by individual owners instead of just large apartment complexes-- usually you get more value for your dollar by renting a condo.

If you had to choose between these, Hampden Heights would probably be the best, since it's right off a major street with easy access to the bus stop.

Personally, if I were you I would consider Aurora-- specifically the section east of I-225, west of Buckley, from Alameda to Smoky Hill-- you can find apartments that are much nicer than the ones you mentioned above for the same price or just a little more, and be pretty conveniently located to bus routes, grocery stores, etc.
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Old 02-21-2012, 12:20 PM
 
5,089 posts, read 14,768,384 times
Reputation: 7005
Quote:
Originally Posted by memartin68 View Post
Hello LiveContent,

I want to thank you for the quick response also for the information about the access bus, where I'm from its MetroLift basically it works the same way. I have no qualms about using the access buses since I use them when I need to. I already contacted rtd asking about the disability rate for the regular transit and all I need is a letter from the specialist stating I'm legally blind which I already have.
However, I was disappointed with the info about the hotel and apts. I guess I'll keep looking for a hotel. I don't have any mobility and orientation training yet so finding an apt. or hotel and an company to work in the same area in a new city and state with no family or friends around will be a bit trick. Better get back to research.
thank You very much.

Looking forward to my new life even if tis a bit scary in the process.
Thanks for the response. I am glade I was able to help. I want to make it clear that there are many more areas in metro Denver that are as safe or even safer than the the Southeast area. I have a feeling that you have reservations about living in some areas. Denver, itself, has some neighborhoods that are much safer to live than areas of the suburbs.

I think you believe that because an area is newer is safer--that is not true. Also newer tends to be more sterile that bore the senses. Most of these southeast areas are very car dependent as they have the sprawl of new developments. My feelings from your post that you are a woman and consequently have some fears that woman tend to have.

The big issues for both of us because of disability issues is a good walkable neighborhood with basic shopping and something to see, nearby. Public transit is very important and the Denver area has excellent public transit if you choose wisely.

Some of these new urbanist communities can serve well. I would suggest you look into Belmar in Lakewood at Wadsworth and Alameda. The apartments on Belmar are expensive but nearby apartments, just south, not so much.

You may also want to consider just across Wadsworth, apartments adjacent to Lakewood Goverment City Center. A new Library is nearby; a King Soopers Grocery and other stores are easily walkable. A big park is right there with a cultural center. In addition, it is a transit center where many buses meet. You can walk across Wadsworth and have access to all the stores in Belmar. You will have a dense area with all amenities close by with churches, a new big hospital, coming light rail in 2013 just west on Alameda--a good area. Very safe area.

Belmar, a shopping destination Events at Belmar in Colorado Shopping at Belmar in Colorado Dining at Belmar in Colorado APARTMENTS IN BELMAR, HOUSES IN BELMAR, CONDOS IN BELMAR, LIVING IN BELMAR Holidays at Belmar and Christmas at Belmar Green Shoppi
Welcome to Lakewood, Colorado
Welcome to the City of Lakewood, Colorado

Livecontent
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Old 02-21-2012, 01:02 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
208 posts, read 395,137 times
Reputation: 220
I would not live anywhere on Hampden. The conveniences on that road are 100% for cars. There isn't a buffer between the sidewalk and the street. That is dangerous during dry season, but it's especially impassable during winter season when the snow piles up and don't expect any business along that road to shovel. Same goes for Arapahoe. Very wide streets create more snow pileup. That is why in-town Denver is controllable, not because it's more competent, but because the streets are so narrow there isn't much snow pileup to worry about.
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Old 02-21-2012, 03:24 PM
 
5,089 posts, read 14,768,384 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cityfilms View Post
I would not live anywhere on Hampden. The conveniences on that road are 100% for cars. There isn't a buffer between the sidewalk and the street. That is dangerous during dry season, but it's especially impassable during winter season when the snow piles up and don't expect any business along that road to shovel. Same goes for Arapahoe. Very wide streets create more snow pileup. That is why in-town Denver is controllable, not because it's more competent, but because the streets are so narrow there isn't much snow pileup to worry about.
That is a very good point for everybody who walks and especially those who have mobility issues. These neighborhoods are just build around the use of cars that there is no consideration for the pedestrian.

I have found in my ramblings that many people in Denver neighborhoods will shovel snow from around bus stops and the wheelchair ramps that run at the end of the sidewalks to the street. They have concerns where the fire hydrants are located and will shovel those out.

Since everything is denser in the City and consequently easier to get to by foot, it is much better for pedestrian. Also the city grid of cross streets make walking shorter, vs. the winding developments that do not interconnect without going to the main road.

Walking along some of these wide streets in the newer areas is also more troubling as the cars travel faster and it just is not the same peaceful walking as in many walkable city neighborhoods. I have no idea how anybody in the likes of Lone Tree walks to the Park Meadow Mall through the dangerous traffic and huge parking lots to get to the stores.

Livecontent
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Old 02-21-2012, 11:10 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
5,610 posts, read 22,395,028 times
Reputation: 5420
Quote:
Originally Posted by cityfilms View Post
I would not live anywhere on Hampden. The conveniences on that road are 100% for cars. There isn't a buffer between the sidewalk and the street. That is dangerous during dry season, but it's especially impassable during winter season when the snow piles up and don't expect any business along that road to shovel. Same goes for Arapahoe. Very wide streets create more snow pileup. That is why in-town Denver is controllable, not because it's more competent, but because the streets are so narrow there isn't much snow pileup to worry about.
That is a very good point, and I agree. Only thing is if the OP's job is located in the suburbs (which it sounds like it is) he may have to end up walking these busy streets anyway.
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Old 02-21-2012, 11:37 PM
 
5,089 posts, read 14,768,384 times
Reputation: 7005
Quote:
Originally Posted by vegaspilgrim View Post
That is a very good point, and I agree. Only thing is if the OP's job is located in the suburbs (which it sounds like it is) he may have to end up walking these busy streets anyway.
No, the OP has stated that he/she does not have a job lined up and has a source of income. I would suspect if the OP is legally blind then he/she would be on Social Security Disability Insurance for a source of income. If that is the case, when you are blind and disable you are allowed to earn much more income than other disabilities and not loose the disability payments. I am not saying that there are advantages to being blind but there are other benefits that do apply.

If you have a mobility disorder and blindness is considered in that category, it is best to take every issue into consideration. I use a rollator/walker and eventually a wheelchair and I would never consider living near these auto dependent areas that do not show consideration for pedestrians and the disabled.

I take the Access-a-Ride and I come into frequent contact with other disabled including the blind. Do not be fooled, the disabled now are a big force with a big voice to be taken into consideration. The disabled in Denver forced RTD to be in compliance with the law, a few years ago, when they did not provide working lifts on their buses and their staff was ill trained.

Now pedestrians are finding their voice and demanding wider sidewalks, more pedestrian friendly intersection and sidewalks that lead all the way to the door of businesses instead of at the end of the parking lot. Cars will have to wait for us, not for us to hurry out of the way of a car. When I see people and woman with strollers racing across a street so the drive does not have to wait too long--I think that is wrong. The pedestrian is the most important, not the car or the impatient driver.

If walking was a big issue and I was force to live in these poorly designed sidewalk areas, and could not move down the street then the municipality would have serious problems under the ADA. They know that but they have not been challenged yet--it will come. That is why in my area and others, all the sidewalks have been rebuilt with wheelchair ramps at the corner because there are strict regulations. New developments now require these to be built.

Livecontent

Last edited by livecontent; 02-22-2012 at 12:06 AM..
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Old 02-23-2012, 05:34 PM
 
11 posts, read 18,871 times
Reputation: 14
Hello All,

First, I want thank all those that took time from their busy lives to reply back. The apartments I mentioned did'nt appeal to me even after I looked at the reviews and frankly I am getting tired of living in apts.Second, I realize that maybe I did not give enough info. about myself...so here goes: I'm a single (I intend to stay that way) mid 40s woman. Safty is very important to me but I can give as good as I get. Rigtt now I work at a national car rental reservation center as a sales agent. My background was healthcare with direct contact with patients, loved it. I have no desire to go back into that field. My current background is customer service/administrative asst. If I had to I could go back into a call center for a little while. I want to go back into healthcare but w/o patients. Anyway, the apartments that I like (for ex. the villages at curtis park) the way I understand is there is a federal program that even with my SSDI and savings is not enough, I was told that I do not qualify to live there. And the more I look into the areas that I liked (wash park, cap. hil, poet's row,etc) I relised that I don't want to live in such a fast paced lifestyle, I was never in the nightlife thing. I did look into the outskirts of Denver...Littlton, Louisville, Lakewood, etc. but I was not sure of the public transit for thse cities.. I had planned to look for a job when I got there, looking for a job when you have a disability is hard enough but when you are out of state its almost impossible, which is why I thought it might be better to look when I get there. I'm putting off getting a guide dog because of apt. living, so if anyone has any suggestions of good, semi safe quiet, transit friendly and yes affordable apt. in any of those cities please let me know otherwise I have to live in an extended stay for another 2 months which I rather not do.

Thanks to All in advance

Pss Sorry about the long post again
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