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Old 06-05-2013, 11:52 AM
 
Location: Evergreen
403 posts, read 755,392 times
Reputation: 485

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The suburbs surrounding the Denver metro area are very homogeneous. It doesn't matter if you have a $200K home or a million $+ home. They were all most likely built by big box builders on smaller lots and look very similar to the neighbors home. That is true for areas north, south, east or west of the city. The shopping centers are all the same. There's Costco, Target, HomeGoods, Staples, etc. popping up everywhere. The restaurants are all the big chains that you find everywhere else. The suburbs are very flat and have fabulous views of the Rockies, but they are also extremely hot due to the lack of tree cover and shade. You will be running your air conditioner at home a lot.

If you want diversity in what your home will look like, you would need to choose to live in downtown Denver in one of the beautiful, established neighborhoods. The immediate Denver metro area will give you unique shops and restaurants as well.

The other area that will give you diversity in what your home will look like is west of Denver in the foothills. Evergreen and Conifer are areas that are located about 30-45 minutes west of downtown Denver and every home is unique. DIA is an hour door to door. My husband travels weekly to DIA and doesn't mind the drive for the quality of life we have here. The many public schools in the area are rated excellent from elementary through high school and there are also private schools as well.
Good luck with your search and move!
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Old 06-05-2013, 10:01 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
90,316 posts, read 120,193,363 times
Reputation: 35920
Quote:
Originally Posted by alliern View Post
The suburbs surrounding the Denver metro area are very homogeneous. It doesn't matter if you have a $200K home or a million $+ home. They were all most likely built by big box builders on smaller lots and look very similar to the neighbors home. That is true for areas north, south, east or west of the city. The shopping centers are all the same. There's Costco, Target, HomeGoods, Staples, etc. popping up everywhere. The restaurants are all the big chains that you find everywhere else. The suburbs are very flat and have fabulous views of the Rockies, but they are also extremely hot due to the lack of tree cover and shade. You will be running your air conditioner at home a lot.

If you want diversity in what your home will look like, you would need to choose to live in downtown Denver in one of the beautiful, established neighborhoods. The immediate Denver metro area will give you unique shops and restaurants as well.

The other area that will give you diversity in what your home will look like is west of Denver in the foothills. Evergreen and Conifer are areas that are located about 30-45 minutes west of downtown Denver and every home is unique. DIA is an hour door to door. My husband travels weekly to DIA and doesn't mind the drive for the quality of life we have here. The many public schools in the area are rated excellent from elementary through high school and there are also private schools as well.
Good luck with your search and move!
Not that I don't like the city neighborhoods, but. . .

Most city neighborhoods are full of bungalows, tudors and other "cookie cutter" type homes. LoDo is full of high rise condo buildings, where there are 3-4 floor plans AT MOST per building. There are blocks and blocks of bungalows, for ex. While there are many unique restaurants in Denver, there are also plenty of chains.
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Old 06-07-2013, 11:54 AM
 
39 posts, read 71,645 times
Reputation: 68
I am originally from Melbourne Australia and have lived in Denver for 20 years. What area of Melbourne do you like and can you relate to and I will tell you which area in Denver corresponds to what you are use to!
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Old 06-07-2013, 06:30 PM
 
39 posts, read 71,645 times
Reputation: 68
Also, if you do move to Denver let me know as there is a really large group of Australians in the Denver area with lots of social events. It is always nice to have the connection.
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Old 11-08-2013, 12:53 PM
 
1,636 posts, read 2,124,494 times
Reputation: 1827
[quote=ChrisFromChicago;29848869]What city doesn't have poor to rich areas? maybe Detroit (all poor) but if you keep going you still get to Ann Arbor.

You must be joking? Or not well traveled. Detroit has one of the most upscale suburbs of any US city. I am unsure of your age, but there was a riot in 1967 where Whites in Detroit reacted differently than Whites in Chicago. They left the city and brought all the wealth into the suburbs. Oakland county is one of the wealthiest counties in the USA. Lastly, the wealthy areas of Detroit go on and on for miles upon miles. Look up Bloomfield Hills, Birmingham, Orchard Lake...only 3 communities that are part of a huge area of wealth. I am originally from the LA area, and I have not seen expansive wealthy areas like Detroit except in my hometown and down through the OC, Dallas, New Jersey, Houston, and northern suburbs of Chicago.
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Old 11-08-2013, 01:16 PM
 
936 posts, read 2,193,869 times
Reputation: 938
When I here about NW metro Denver area I think about the Rocky Flats plutonium contamination. A very unfortunate event and one that prospective buyers should be aware of.
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Old 08-16-2015, 02:23 AM
 
1 posts, read 624 times
Reputation: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by knail View Post
I am originally from Melbourne Australia and have lived in Denver for 20 years. What area of Melbourne do you like and can you relate to and I will tell you which area in Denver corresponds to what you are use to!
Hi

We are moving from Melbourne in a coupe of weeks n I saw your post. We use to live in Kensington / ascot vale and are now living in hampton as my hubby works over this way and the commute was getting too much.

We were looking around highlands ranch but am now looking closer in as we think it might be a better fit....we have a 8 & 6 year old.

Any thoughts ....
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