U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Colorado > Denver
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Closed Thread Start New Thread
 
Old 11-30-2007, 02:32 AM
 
163 posts, read 741,760 times
Reputation: 84

Advertisements

oooooook, just read your last post...

In my opinion. The best skills you can have for getting into a development company (or really anything in the business world) is communication, marketing, and sales! I don't see how accounting is going to be any help getting in the door with a development co. unless you're excited about going over their books! Accounting is great if you want to be a CPA, other than that and it will put you to sleep. Outside of academia, you need real life business experience, and you won't get that in an MBA or in any business classes. You can however, enroll in what Zig Ziglar likes to call Automobile University! Basically, you can learn a wealth of practical business and personal knowledge though books and audio tapes (CD's). I'll throw in seminars as well.

So the point is.... you don't need more classes or degrees if you're interested in commercial development. You need to get out there and get into it, get in the mix, see how it works, what's it like day-to-day, get to know people in the business, and see if you really like it even! Then you'll know if it's what you want to pursue. And the skills you need to expand and polish for this industry are not finance or accounting but communications and sales.

Hope that is helpful!

Oh, by the way...familiar with this website? DenverInfill.com: Downtown Denver and Its Urban Infill and Redevelopment Projects bet there's a lot of people over there that know people in the industry...
Rate this post positively

 
Old 11-30-2007, 05:19 AM
 
Location: San Diego > Denver
264 posts, read 1,335,829 times
Reputation: 88
vegaspilgrim,
I'm not a Denver native (working on becoming a transplant!). But can I offer a slightly different perspective. I AM relatively old (40's), and can offer a bit of reflection. May have nothing to do with you exactly, but it's food for thought.
I've lived in San Diego all my life. Went to school here, went to SDSU here, graduated with a degree in Graphic Design. I didn't end up as a designer.

I didn't have the courage to travel anywhere or move anywhere and was so hung up on making any kind of mistakes that I didn't take any chances.

Looking back to my 20's, before marriage, kids, and a mortgage, I wish I had taken more chances with my life. Moved to a different state, move again if I didn't like it, and took more chances with careers. With a graphic design degree, I realized too late into the program that I didn't want to be creative on the clock, so I never pursued that specific job title. It took me 10 years to finish college with no debt and I don't regret it.

And, BTW, I've been a manager for many years in 3 vastly different industries, and your English degree WILL still count for something. When hiring people, I always looked to their experience, willingness to work and learn as a bigger factor in my hiring choice vs. just looking at their degree. Hey, at least you can write an intelligent email, right?

As for living just in the West. Why not? If you suspect or strongly feel you don't belong in any other area, you don't need to force yourself. Ask yourself this - "Why do I feel I need to talk myself into moving East or South?" That said, you DO have the luxury of being able to move, relatively unencumbered, ANYWHERE in the world That said, if you feel strongly that you need to attend school in the East to achieve your passion, then suck it up for a few years, go to school, and then move to where you really want to be. If you can find a field that you're passionate about, then you'll be willing to do what you need to do to break in.

The world is your playground! Go explore and figure out what you really have a passion for. If you're in your right field, doors will open for you that wouldn't open for others.
Do this even though the field might be competitive, have too many workers, or is hard to break into.

You have the luxury of time and energy right now. Take every chance you have. Even if that means you end up back in Denver.

As for your parents, I would listen to them with a sympathetic ear, and realize there's some truth in what they say, BUT also, the business world and the way people get jobs and work today can be different. It's not the stigma it once was to change jobs and careers. They seem like they have your best interests at heart, but you're old enough now to make your own mistakes and find your own way, right? ")

Good luck with everything
Rate this post positively
 
Old 11-30-2007, 11:49 AM
 
Location: Denver, CO
739 posts, read 2,827,494 times
Reputation: 203
couple points-

As a recruiter in Denver (and also several other cities) I agree with the posters who said that your degree does not matter for most professions. My significant other does real estate work, and has a philosophy degree. It also does not matter, if you are going to go into a consulting profession. Employers look for a higher GPA, or a good school versus what you majored in. The only caveat to this would be if you were going into something very specialized or an IT programming job where you really needed that Computer Science degree.

As much as you may not want to live with your parents... that is a great idea if you are considering testing out Denver again and trying to get a job here. Makes for a little less risk IMO. You don't have to sign a long lease or get "stuck" somewhere.

Also, if you are interested in Real Estate Development- and many firms here (several large REITS are based in Denver) hire analysts right out of college. MDC Holdings (based here) also has a very good training program and they hire out of college. DU has a very well regarded Real Estate Master's program. May want to check out online. I think it is a 1 yr program.

Best of luck to you.
Rate this post positively
 
Old 11-30-2007, 01:11 PM
 
5,090 posts, read 14,539,468 times
Reputation: 6970
Default Lingua Franca

Vegaspilgrim,

I have read, enjoyed and understood your posts; the reason is that you write well. I would not under value your English education. In today world with emails and computers, we do more writing than we did before. Years ago, an executive, with less than perfect skills would dictate a letter and a secretary would clean it up. Today most correspondence is done directly by that manager and if his writing is poor, he is perceived as stupid. There will be many reports that you will have to do, in any job, that will require good english language skills and the ability to read and understand. In most cases, there will not be an adminstrative assistant to make you look good.

I had an executive job which required me to stay in contact with people all over the world with emails. Other people who have learned English as a second language or are in a different English speaking station, notice immediately yours errors.

I learned very quickly, after some embarrassements, that what I wrote, was instantly forwarded to many other people, and if I did not use the proper grammar and the appropriate style--I looked like a fool. I learned to write my important emails, save them, and go back and review that it was correct in clarity, agreement and style--and then I would send them. It was also more important when I was angry, to stop, save, review and then send or maybe delete it.

From my experience the most important books that I had available on my desk were a dicitionary, and a style guide, (numerous style guides), English Usage Guides; German, French Language Dictionaries and their appropriate usage and style guides--I have some limited multilingual skills; I was trained in the Army as a translator/interpreter. Also, It is very important to know that other English language cultures interpret english words differently, so at times an Oxford English Dictionary was very helpful.


I have seen too much bad writing from very so called "educated" people--engineers, doctors, architects etc. and many more college educated people who do not even know that the "Chicago Manual of Style" exists or should exist.

Yea, I know my spelling sometimes is bad, but this is casual on a forum; my grammar is bad in some areas, agreements in nouns and verbs, proper punctutation--but again this is casual. However, on very important correspondences, I take great care.

The use of the English Language, which is becoming the "Lingua Franca" of the world, is the most important skill you can have.
Now am I sure that I spelled "Lingua Franca" correctly--well, I looked it up. I knew the phrase; I knew what it meant (because I am well read and college educated)--but it is important to verify the spelling, to get a point across (Ah, I was right.) and my point is, if you do not understand a word or phrase, it is important look it up. so you can use it correctly and be better perceived in your writing.


Livecontent
Rate this post positively
 
Old 12-01-2007, 07:01 PM
 
637 posts, read 2,191,193 times
Reputation: 283
Quote:
Originally Posted by kimmer View Post
vegaspilgrim,
I'm not a Denver native (working on becoming a transplant!). But can I offer a slightly different perspective. I AM relatively old (40's), and can offer a bit of reflection. May have nothing to do with you exactly, but it's food for thought.
I've lived in San Diego all my life. Went to school here, went to SDSU here, graduated with a degree in Graphic Design. I didn't end up as a designer.

I didn't have the courage to travel anywhere or move anywhere and was so hung up on making any kind of mistakes that I didn't take any chances.

Looking back to my 20's, before marriage, kids, and a mortgage, I wish I had taken more chances with my life. Moved to a different state, move again if I didn't like it, and took more chances with careers. With a graphic design degree, I realized too late into the program that I didn't want to be creative on the clock, so I never pursued that specific job title. It took me 10 years to finish college with no debt and I don't regret it.

And, BTW, I've been a manager for many years in 3 vastly different industries, and your English degree WILL still count for something. When hiring people, I always looked to their experience, willingness to work and learn as a bigger factor in my hiring choice vs. just looking at their degree. Hey, at least you can write an intelligent email, right?

As for living just in the West. Why not? If you suspect or strongly feel you don't belong in any other area, you don't need to force yourself. Ask yourself this - "Why do I feel I need to talk myself into moving East or South?" That said, you DO have the luxury of being able to move, relatively unencumbered, ANYWHERE in the world That said, if you feel strongly that you need to attend school in the East to achieve your passion, then suck it up for a few years, go to school, and then move to where you really want to be. If you can find a field that you're passionate about, then you'll be willing to do what you need to do to break in.

The world is your playground! Go explore and figure out what you really have a passion for. If you're in your right field, doors will open for you that wouldn't open for others.
Do this even though the field might be competitive, have too many workers, or is hard to break into.

You have the luxury of time and energy right now. Take every chance you have. Even if that means you end up back in Denver.

As for your parents, I would listen to them with a sympathetic ear, and realize there's some truth in what they say, BUT also, the business world and the way people get jobs and work today can be different. It's not the stigma it once was to change jobs and careers. They seem like they have your best interests at heart, but you're old enough now to make your own mistakes and find your own way, right? ")

Good luck with everything
I agree! And don't forget to backpack Europe before marriage, kids, and the mortgage! I am still kicking myself for that. It costs a fortune when you have "settled".
Rate this post positively
 
Old 12-02-2007, 12:30 AM
 
249 posts, read 982,219 times
Reputation: 102
DenverAztec please post more! I love them dearly!
Rate this post positively
 
Old 12-03-2007, 06:17 AM
 
10 posts, read 24,263 times
Reputation: 15
Until now Charles,,,,,I'm a or until recently a 51 yr. old native of Denv. I would never go back there. If the whole country was ablaze and Denv. was the only place that had water, I'd prefer to burn. What use to be the kewlest city in America to live and grow up in is now just another poo-hole in America. I'm actually truly ashamed of my former neighbors for letting it happen. Haven't had tv for a few months, any chance Hickenlooper has gotten hit with an airplane yet? At least -do nothing - Owens is finally out of the picture.
Rate this post positively
 
Old 12-03-2007, 07:48 AM
 
Location: in the southwest
13,395 posts, read 42,940,378 times
Reputation: 13502
I do not wholeheartedly concur with 51Ampfuse (listen to old Stones much?) or Esya, but I do understand where they are coming from--and I did leave Denver in '05 after moving there in 1968. It's getting pretty crowded there, and Aztec's pictures are beautiful and very real indeed, but I don't think they were all taken in November. That cold/dry combo feels awfully harsh after awhile. Having said all that, I still think Denver is a fine place, and Colorado a beautiful state.

Totally Random Thoughts:

Vegaspilgrim, I really appreciate your interest in infill development, and think it would be so cool if you could pursue that. There is a lot of that going on where I live (north Florida), and on top of that, many use "green" building standards.
I agree with livecontent that you communicate very well and should take advantage of that ability.

Further, I agree with Morningglory that doing the backpacking thing before marriage and kids is a good idea.

I suppose some people have more wanderlust and sense of adventure than others. It doesn't hurt to at least travel and check things out while you are unencumbered. It sounds like you truly love the West in general and Denver in particular, but people, when exposed to other places, can thrive on the broadened horizons. My older (age 24) kid, born and raised in Denver, is now in Paris and looks to stay there, but New York City would be the second choice for him. He literally has friends all over the world.

If your brain is really fried from school, maybe your idea of getting an entry level job now might be a good one, but does it have to be Phoenix? Could you not go back to Denver, work awhile, and see what's out there? If the 'rents, as much as you love them, are that hard to deal with, you don't have to live with them. They can't live your life for you, and need to accept that.

I grew up with this mystique about the Wide Open Spaces in the West.
But you should see all the wild, undeveloped land in north Florida. (This is why I so happily observe the infill development.)
Bottom line for me is that there isn't anything inherently special about the West--there's just a lot of it.
IMHO it is good for young people to see what else is out there, and afterwards, if they so desire, to return to their roots.
Rate this post positively
 
Old 12-03-2007, 05:10 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
5,610 posts, read 22,061,841 times
Reputation: 5413
Ampfuse sounds like too many fuses have been blown in his brain... If he thinks Denver is the next Juarez... then what does that make the other 17 US metropolitan areas that are even larger than Denver-- the next Mogadishu? I mean, come on! I just watched a documentary today about life in Tijuana, showing how people live in desperate poverty, living in tin shacks with dirt floors, no running water, sewage in the streets, etc. Denver-- and pretty much any American city is a paradise compared to those Mexican border towns.

cil-- thanks for your input-- I like to hear all points of view. I'm glad you like it better in Florida, where it suits you better. Let me guess-- are you retired? No thanks, personally. I mean, yeah, if someone put a gun to my head and said the choice is Tijuana, or somewhere in Florida, or death... I'd pick Florida. That's about what it would take though-- flying cockroaches, hurricanes, swamps, alligators, extreme humidity-- no thanks. I'd rather stay here in Arizona any day. Realistically, there are many places I would consider trying out if a great job/educational opportunity opened up (after all, if I was really that much of a die-hard Denverite, I wouldn't have gone to college out of state in the first place)-- just not THAT far south and east.
Rate this post positively
 
Old 12-03-2007, 05:34 PM
 
Location: in the southwest
13,395 posts, read 42,940,378 times
Reputation: 13502
Quote:
Originally Posted by vegaspilgrim View Post
Let me guess-- are you retired? No thanks, personally. I mean, yeah, if someone put a gun to my head and said the choice is Tijuana, or somewhere in Florida, or death... I'd pick Florida. That's about what it would take though-- flying cockroaches, hurricanes, swamps, alligators, extreme humidity-- no thanks. I'd rather stay here in Arizona any day. Realistically, there are many places I would consider trying out if a great job/educational opportunity opened up (after all, if I was really that much of a die-hard Denverite, I wouldn't have gone to college out of state in the first place)-- just not THAT far south and east.
Ah, that reflexive gun-to-the-head negative attitude about Florida.
We got a lot of it in Denver before we moved. Everyone was under the impression that we were moving to Disneyland, or Miami.
People just don't know, and they are convinced they are in god's country so they don't care to find out.
FWIW:
1) Neither spouse nor I are retired

2) North Florida is quite different from the southern peninsula (and by the way, Florida has not had any hurricanes in two years)

3) I am really not trying to convince you to move here!
What I *was* trying to do, in my random and scattered way, is show you that the world is a big place, there is a lot out there for you to see and do before you set down roots.
And that eventually, you could possibly change your mind as well as your location.
I guess I am being just like your parents, but in the opposite way.
Rate this post positively
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Closed Thread


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Colorado > Denver

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2022, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top