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Old 11-08-2019, 10:47 AM
 
572 posts, read 201,993 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sammy87 View Post
I was speaking of the US.

Good areas with good schools, weather, jobs etc.....all are pretty $$$$. My buddy moved to Indy and had to take a 40% pay cut but at least his home is 30% cheaper?
Well, life is full of compromises. And you can do just as well without as you could with.

I'd have loved to graduate from Harvard, but I had to settle on a public Uni instead. My outcomes are perfectly okay.

I'd love to live in a gated community and rub elbows with the 1%, but I had to settle with living amongst the "common folk".

I'd love to have waves crashing outside my bedroom window, but I had to settle for mountains and plains.

NYC, Chicago, Boston, Seattle, Portland, San Fran all have relatively dreary climates compared to Denver, and all have the same or higher COL than Denver.

Boise, SLC, Albuquerque, Cheyenne, Flagstaff, Reno, and Spokane all offer a similar experience to Denver at a reduced price.

There are plenty of Midwestern states that are wonderful places to live if you can deal with the winter season, which we already do to some extent living in Colorado (especially those of us who ski/snowboard).
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Old 11-08-2019, 03:01 PM
 
5,610 posts, read 9,900,805 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iSudo View Post
Well, life is full of compromises. And you can do just as well without as you could with.

I'd have loved to graduate from Harvard, but I had to settle on a public Uni instead. My outcomes are perfectly okay.

I'd love to live in a gated community and rub elbows with the 1%, but I had to settle with living amongst the "common folk".

I'd love to have waves crashing outside my bedroom window, but I had to settle for mountains and plains.

NYC, Chicago, Boston, Seattle, Portland, San Fran all have relatively dreary climates compared to Denver, and all have the same or higher COL than Denver.

Boise, SLC, Albuquerque, Cheyenne, Flagstaff, Reno, and Spokane all offer a similar experience to Denver at a reduced price.

There are plenty of Midwestern states that are wonderful places to live if you can deal with the winter season, which we already do to some extent living in Colorado (especially those of us who ski/snowboard).
Haha sure Cheyenne and Flagstaff, basically what would be unremarkable suburbs in the Denver area, are a "similar experience". Not sure how you compare ABQ to Denver either, other than being at a higher altitude life there is completely different. The others except SLC you'd basically have to put in the good for those wanting smaller town experience category.
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Old 11-08-2019, 03:07 PM
 
572 posts, read 201,993 times
Reputation: 960
Quote:
Originally Posted by Willy702 View Post
Haha sure Cheyenne and Flagstaff, basically what would be unremarkable suburbs in the Denver area, are a "similar experience". Not sure how you compare ABQ to Denver either, other than being at a higher altitude life there is completely different. The others except SLC you'd basically have to put in the good for those wanting smaller town experience category.
The point is missed on you then.

People live all over the country happily and peacefully, and without spending $$$$ on COL as the poster I responded to suggested is a requirement. Where ever you go, there you are.
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Old 11-08-2019, 09:30 PM
 
Location: Eastern Colorado
3,807 posts, read 5,038,558 times
Reputation: 5036
Quote:
Originally Posted by iSudo View Post
Well, life is full of compromises. And you can do just as well without as you could with.

I'd have loved to graduate from Harvard, but I had to settle on a public Uni instead. My outcomes are perfectly okay.

I'd love to live in a gated community and rub elbows with the 1%, but I had to settle with living amongst the "common folk".

I'd love to have waves crashing outside my bedroom window, but I had to settle for mountains and plains.

NYC, Chicago, Boston, Seattle, Portland, San Fran all have relatively dreary climates compared to Denver, and all have the same or higher COL than Denver.

Boise, SLC, Albuquerque, Cheyenne, Flagstaff, Reno, and Spokane all offer a similar experience to Denver at a reduced price.

There are plenty of Midwestern states that are wonderful places to live if you can deal with the winter season, which we already do to some extent living in Colorado (especially those of us who ski/snowboard).
The only thing those cities have that is similar to Denver is the outdoor mountain activities, although Albuquerque doesn't have the winter activities.

Denver has many more national music tours, art shows, off broadway and broadway plays, nearby outdoor activities, nearby casinos, and professional sports franchises than the rest of them. While you may not find value in all these activities there are many that do, and that is what drives the COL and people wanting to be in Denver over your list that you claim are similar. If people could find similar elsewhere than Denver would not have been growing for the last 40 years.
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Old 11-08-2019, 10:02 PM
 
572 posts, read 201,993 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jwiley View Post
The only thing those cities have that is similar to Denver is the outdoor mountain activities, although Albuquerque doesn't have the winter activities.

Denver has many more national music tours, art shows, off broadway and broadway plays, nearby outdoor activities, nearby casinos, and professional sports franchises than the rest of them. While you may not find value in all these activities there are many that do, and that is what drives the COL and people wanting to be in Denver over your list that you claim are similar. If people could find similar elsewhere than Denver would not have been growing for the last 40 years.
Yeah, but what you’re leaving out is that Denver didn’t always have these things. Many of the hip neighborhoods people are struggling to get into today were once considered rough areas. Nobody was paying top dollar to be in RiNo, Five Points, Baker, or Highlands 15-20 years ago. Denver wasn’t really a major landing destination until 15ish years ago once it started popping up on all the “places people are moving” lists. It didn’t have a baseball or stable hockey team until the mid-90s.

Every large city has a starting point where the tides turned. And you’ll notice Denver isn’t on those “hot places to live” lists much anymore. There are a new generation of small cities like Des Moines, Grand Rapids, Boise, Colorado Springs, Nashville, Indy, and Columbus that are luring young, educated workers that are seeking bargains for their first homes.
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Old 11-08-2019, 10:42 PM
 
Location: Aurora, CO
7,351 posts, read 11,660,554 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iSudo View Post
Yeah, but what you’re leaving out is that Denver didn’t always have these things. Many of the hip neighborhoods people are struggling to get into today were once considered rough areas. Nobody was paying top dollar to be in RiNo, Five Points, Baker, or Highlands 15-20 years ago. Denver wasn’t really a major landing destination until 15ish years ago once it started popping up on all the “places people are moving” lists. It didn’t have a baseball or stable hockey team until the mid-90s.

Every large city has a starting point where the tides turned. And you’ll notice Denver isn’t on those “hot places to live” lists much anymore. There are a new generation of small cities like Des Moines, Grand Rapids, Boise, Colorado Springs, Nashville, Indy, and Columbus that are luring young, educated workers that are seeking bargains for their first homes.
If it's so terrible in Denver, then why are you still here?

FWIW, most of those cities wouldn't appeal to me for 20x my current salary. Indy, Columbus, Nashville, Des Moines, and Grand Rapids are all humid. Pass. Nashville's hot. Columbus is one of the cloudiest cities in America. Indy's crime-ridden and perennially listed as one of the Top 10-20 "Most Dangerous Cities in the US."

Last edited by bluescreen73; 11-08-2019 at 11:34 PM..
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Old 11-09-2019, 10:53 AM
 
Location: Eastern Colorado
3,807 posts, read 5,038,558 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iSudo View Post
Yeah, but what you’re leaving out is that Denver didn’t always have these things. Many of the hip neighborhoods people are struggling to get into today were once considered rough areas. Nobody was paying top dollar to be in RiNo, Five Points, Baker, or Highlands 15-20 years ago. Denver wasn’t really a major landing destination until 15ish years ago once it started popping up on all the “places people are moving” lists. It didn’t have a baseball or stable hockey team until the mid-90s.

Every large city has a starting point where the tides turned. And you’ll notice Denver isn’t on those “hot places to live” lists much anymore. There are a new generation of small cities like Des Moines, Grand Rapids, Boise, Colorado Springs, Nashville, Indy, and Columbus that are luring young, educated workers that are seeking bargains for their first homes.
You really should do some research, the Denver metro area has been one of the fastest growing areas in the country since the mid 1960s, over 50 years of very consistent growth. This is not some new thing.

Here is something else that will shock you, back in the 50s and 60s Rino, Baker, Five Points, and North Denver were all very popular.

Cities run in cycles, while in the 80s and 90s Littleton and highlands ranch were where people wanted to be, today they would rather be closer to the city itself. That is a nationwide event as younger generations prefer to be more urban, which has led to bad neighborhoods being redeveloped.


As for other cities being on lists, who cares? Most of those cities suck when compared to Denver, and I know many people that have moved to areas like Indy and C SPrings who would much rather live in Denver. By the way which of those cities have experienced double digit percentage growth for the last 15 years? The Denver metro is still adding around 60,000 people a year, and the construction industry estimates that we still need over 50,000 housing units to take care of the current population. If people choose to go elsewhere there is nothing wrong with that, but to act like Denver is in trouble or is just another city because they are not on some list is actually funny. We cannot sustain the current growth, which indicates to me that plenty of people see much more value moving to Denver than you seem to perceive.
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Old 11-09-2019, 11:21 AM
Status: "Looking forward to President Harris" (set 25 days ago)
 
Location: Berkeley, Denver, CO USA
15,638 posts, read 23,520,652 times
Reputation: 26875
Quote:
Originally Posted by jwiley View Post
By the way which of those cities have experienced double digit percentage growth for the last 15 years?
Columbus - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Columb...o#Demographics
Boise - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boise,_Idaho#Demographics
Nashville - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nashvi...e#Demographics
Colorado Springs - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colora...o#Demographics
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Old 11-09-2019, 11:35 AM
 
572 posts, read 201,993 times
Reputation: 960
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluescreen73 View Post
If it's so terrible in Denver, then why are you still here?

FWIW, most of those cities wouldn't appeal to me for 20x my current salary. Indy, Columbus, Nashville, Des Moines, and Grand Rapids are all humid. Pass. Nashville's hot. Columbus is one of the cloudiest cities in America. Indy's crime-ridden and perennially listed as one of the Top 10-20 "Most Dangerous Cities in the US."


It's sad that people can only see this as a black and white issue.

Because I recognize other places as growing and attracting young talent, I must absolutely loathe living in Denver and must really want to leave? C'mon, get over yourself.

Take the emotion of this and your vested interest in this city and just try to think about it logically for one minute. Denver was not always a top destination, despite its gradual growth over time. It inherited huge swarms of population in the last 15 or so years as people migrated away from dying Midwestern cities, expensive coastal cities, or people just looking for a change in pace/scenery. It's a nice place, no doubt, but it's not without its own set of flaws and it's not for everyone.

All I'm saying is that there are other places in America that are now experiencing similar growth trends, attracting young college-educated talent. Despite Denver's appeal as it stands today, there are a lot of reasons why it may not appeal to some people. COL being one, similar to how COL has chased people out of places like San Francisco and SoCal.

If you don't like those place because of tHe HuMiDItY, then don't move there. Nobody, especially not me, is trying to sell you on that idea.
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Old 11-09-2019, 11:41 AM
 
572 posts, read 201,993 times
Reputation: 960
Top Google searches for "Hottest real estate markets 2019":

https://constructioncoverage.com/res...ate-markets-us

https://www.buildium.com/blog/up-and...-markets-2019/

https://www.foxbusiness.com/markets/...estate-markets

https://www.realtor.com/news/trends/...ttest-markets/

https://www.sofi.com/blog/top-real-estate-markets/

With exception to the top-50 list, Denver is not on any of these other lists. Some of these markets are emerging and are just starting to take off.
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