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Old 12-09-2019, 10:50 AM
 
Location: Just south of Denver since 1989
11,483 posts, read 31,069,023 times
Reputation: 8104

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Quote:
Originally Posted by iSudo View Post
Blame it on the low barrier to entry and fast/easy money that has attracted the glut of non-talent. Same with home inspectors.
Home inspectors are not licensed in Colorado.

But what do you consider a low barrier to getting a real estate license?

And the money is anything but easy and fast.
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Old 12-09-2019, 11:00 AM
 
572 posts, read 201,600 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2bindenver View Post
Home inspectors are not licensed in Colorado.

But what do you consider a low barrier to getting a real estate license?

And the money is anything but easy and fast.
I didn't say home inspectors were licensed. I was addressing the general low barrier to entry into the consumer real estate field. Depending on your dedication level, you can get your license in 4-6 weeks. It's about 1-2 weeks to get certified in home inspection.

The vast majority of agents I've encountered are in the same class as used car sales people or retail sales people. There are some good ones, don't get me wrong. The agent who helped us buy our home was terrific; very skilled negotiator, diligent, and great communicator. A lot of people are drawn to this field because of how lucrative it can be and how relatively easy it is to break into the field. This attracts a lot of the "wrong" people as a result, and I'm sure the fire hot RE market didn't help this matter when houses could sell themselves. I'm willing to bet a lot of the $$$-hungry agents who jumped on the bandwagon from 2013 on will churn and burn as the market tightens up.
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Old 12-09-2019, 11:21 AM
 
620 posts, read 479,127 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by himain View Post
Currently looking to buy and I cannot believe the unprofessionalism of some of these realtors!!!! I can't even get a dam phone call/email back on their listings. One responded after the second email with: what do you want to know?
Exact and only words. I've got to go take my tests and smoke these idiots out of business

Interesting point brought up. I saw the same thing when looking for my place in SF awhile back. Back before it got as bad as it is now real estate agents didn’t take buyers seriously until they had financing lined up and could basically prove that they could make an offer for 120% of the list price within 3 days (since the offer date was usually the Tuesday after the open house). Plus, which is likely not as applicable there, cash buyers got priority, so the worst agents preferred that you could make a cash purchase or would discourage even trying. It also didnt help that even though I have the money to buy, I look young and tend to dress casually, so I come off as too young and poor to be worth their time. So...I got tired of being ignored by going into the offices, like any normal person would, so I took a different approach. I went into open houses of nicer properties in the neighborhoods I was interested in and talked to agents there. Using this method to interview them I found a really good agent who helped find and buy a nice spot within a couple months.

The problem is that they don’t have to even try to sell anything these days, so unless you prove you’re not a waste of time they blow you off. It’s aggravating and it pissed me off too. But once I changed my approach I was able to get past all the lower end agents, which is a majority unfortunately.

Maybe you could try something similar?

Good luck!
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Old 12-09-2019, 05:21 PM
 
Location: Just south of Denver since 1989
11,483 posts, read 31,069,023 times
Reputation: 8104
Quote:
Originally Posted by iSudo View Post
Depending on your dedication level, you can get your license in 4-6 weeks. It's about 1-2 weeks to get certified in home inspection.
There is no certification training for home inspectors in Colorado.

4.2 weeks of classroom work, fingerprints, CBI/FBI background check, school test, state test, national test, and a broker to sponsor you, and once that happens, errors and omissions insurance.

If it was easy, everyone would do it. It’s not easy.
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Old 12-09-2019, 08:27 PM
 
572 posts, read 201,600 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2bindenver View Post
There is no certification training for home inspectors in Colorado.

4.2 weeks of classroom work, fingerprints, CBI/FBI background check, school test, state test, national test, and a broker to sponsor you, and once that happens, errors and omissions insurance.

If it was easy, everyone would do it. It’s not easy.
Clearly you seem confused by some sort of "board certified" or "licensing" process, which is not what I'm alluding to. There are various certification programs and associations out there, including NACHI, ASHI, etc. that home inspectors typically choose to align with and get certified by as a precursor to joining the field. You paint this picture as if these folks are in some exclusive field, which is humorous to say the least. The running joke is that "everyone and their brother has their RE license", and it's probably not that far fetched. If it was such a highly exclusive field to break into, with a high barrier to entry, then this would not be the case.

Rocket science is an exclusive field. Petroleum engineering is an exclusive field. CPAs and actuarial science are both exclusive and have a high barrier to entry. Real estate is not exclusive, and relatively speaking, has a very low barrier to entry as far as professions go.
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Old 12-09-2019, 09:04 PM
 
Location: Just south of Denver since 1989
11,483 posts, read 31,069,023 times
Reputation: 8104
this is an opinion thread about Denver real estate. Please keep the myths and untruths out of this thread.
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Old 12-09-2019, 09:12 PM
 
572 posts, read 201,600 times
Reputation: 960
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2bindenver View Post
this is an opinion thread about Denver real estate. Please keep the myths and untruths out of this thread.
Considering nothing I said was untrue, and it is my opinion about the local RE field based on several transactions worth of personal experience, I'd say we're on the same page.

Last edited by iSudo; 12-09-2019 at 09:27 PM..
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Old 12-09-2019, 10:51 PM
 
1,204 posts, read 1,539,983 times
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Home inspections have become a joke in most states, given what they “don’t” verify these days. Lots of self-preserving practices in both fields taking advantage of uninformed infrequent customers.
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Old 01-07-2020, 10:09 AM
 
Location: Chicago 'burbs
195 posts, read 102,073 times
Reputation: 290
Going up, close to 5% yr over yr

I guess, for a good updated house you are looking at $600,000 range

Residential, detached:

Close Price - Average: @ $484,000 Dec 2019 - from $462,00 Dec 2018 --> 4.9% up
Close Price - Median: @ $418,00 Dec 2019 - from $400,000 Dec 2018 --> 4.5% up

Source/Credit: DMAR January 2020 Report (Page 14)
Link: https://www.dmarealtors.com/sites/de...anuary2020.pdf
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Old 01-13-2020, 05:20 PM
 
166 posts, read 109,627 times
Reputation: 205
hah! Good for me is 350k range! 3 beds 2 baths.... I guess it depends on our standards.

Been touring some places, and as I explore the neighborhoods, I can't help but think about how things are slowing down, how states are legalizing marijuana and that industry is losing it's novelty.

Interest rates are at an all time low. Yet still we are slowing down. What happens when they go up?
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