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Old 06-04-2017, 10:00 AM
 
Location: Way up high
22,317 posts, read 29,400,492 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DougStark View Post
If you're a person who is picky about keeping your car clean, Denver's winters will disappoint you. After a snow they're all covered with dirt, sand and salt.
That's what car washes are for. Plus make sure you get the undercarriage cleaned to get all the salt off
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Old 06-04-2017, 03:30 PM
 
Location: Albuquerque
1,321 posts, read 2,027,847 times
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I guess if you're asking the question it really concerns you. You should move out here and see for yourself whether or not you're able to adapt and learn how to drive in the winter. Learn how to dress in the winter and survive. Many people are able to adapt to a change in weather. Good luck to you.
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Old 06-09-2017, 10:02 PM
 
Location: OC
12,805 posts, read 9,532,543 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluescreen73 View Post
IMNSHO summer in Austin is considerably worse than winter in Denver.

Winters here are highly variable. It doesn't stay cold, snowy, and cloudy for weeks on end, and you're very likely to see 50 & 60 degree temps between storms.

Summers in the Texas Triangle suck. Highs in the 90s with moderate humidity for weeks on end. No cooling off at night, either. Summer's when you're most likely to be outside and Denver has the better summer climate hands down.

Austin is outdoorsy by Texas standards, but it's not in the same league as Denver. Austin bests Denver in terms of water recreation and that's really about it.

Traffic in Austin is unholy. It makes Denver's traffic problems seem trivial.
Former Austinite and I would agree, but the highs can be in the 100s in the Texas triangle.
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Old 06-09-2017, 10:22 PM
 
Location: Mile High
325 posts, read 371,540 times
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I currently live in Denver, but have lived near Irvine and Austin. My husband and I have the flexibility to live anywhere we want, and we chose Denver. I grew up in Texas, he grew up in L.A., and the winters here don't bother us at all. In fact, we love the changing of the seasons. The snow and cold blow through, then the next day the sun comes out and warms up the world. It's nice. It's not like the winters you'd get on the Eastern seaboard or around the Great Lakes.

We left California because we couldn't get into a neighborhood with good schools. Here, there are great schools to pick from.

I wouldn't call Denver the most walkable city, but there are certainly neighborhoods you could find that.

All that said, if I wanted to move anywhere else, it's be Austin. But then, once a Texas girl, always a Texas girl.
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Old 06-09-2017, 11:14 PM
 
2,333 posts, read 1,487,836 times
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I grew up in LA and the first time I ever saw snow was when I moved to Boston during the winter one year, then lived through the "polar vortex" in NYC shortly after. Okay, the latter really sucked, but only because I had to walk to work each day. Otherwise snow itself isn't that big of a deal, and you get used to the cold pretty quickly. To me, the benefits of 4 seasons far outweighed it. It always gave you something to look forward to.
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Old 06-09-2017, 11:18 PM
 
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Previously lived in Honolulu and San Diego, the southwest and Midwest. Denver is of course a far cry from the warm climes of southern California, but the winters are better than every major Midwestern and eastern seaboard city.

The main difference as others have pointed out is that temperatures vary a LOT from day to day, even hour to hour. It can go from 10 degrees or colder on a clear night and into the 50s during the day. It can get below zero sometimes.

And when a blizzard comes blowing in, it can get nasty with a 1-2 feet of snow coming down over the course of a 2-3 days. But these events aren't the norm. Most of the time you get 4-8 inches of fluffy dry snow that is quickly gone. And there is huge variation year to year.

My biggest issue with the winters was the combination of cold, dry air, and rapid temp changes. I feel like I got more chest/bronchial colds in Denver than any place I've lived including the upper Midwest. When there is a temperature inversion (cold air at the surface trapped under a layer of warm air) air pollution gets trapped, so you can have cold smog, combined with high elevation that may bother people with breathing issues. These conditions are very unusual though, perhaps a couple times per season.

So yes, Denver does have the potential for sub-zero temps and heavy snow, but also a lot of sunny, 50 degree days in January.
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Old 06-10-2017, 11:36 AM
 
Location: OC
12,805 posts, read 9,532,543 times
Reputation: 10599
Quote:
Originally Posted by BicoastalAnn View Post
I grew up in LA and the first time I ever saw snow was when I moved to Boston during the winter one year, then lived through the "polar vortex" in NYC shortly after. Okay, the latter really sucked, but only because I had to walk to work each day. Otherwise snow itself isn't that big of a deal, and you get used to the cold pretty quickly. To me, the benefits of 4 seasons far outweighed it. It always gave you something to look forward to.
Agree. I like my seasons. I stand and wait for the but every morning last winter when it was below 30 often. Not bad if you dress for it.
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Old 06-11-2017, 02:19 PM
 
1,849 posts, read 1,807,062 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by A1eutian View Post

So yes, Denver does have the potential for sub-zero temps and heavy snow, but also a lot of sunny, 50 degree days in January.
Pretty much sums it up. We really didn't have much of a winter this year (it snowed like 5x and only got sub zero temps like 3x if that in December.) March on average this year was between 60-85 degrees and a complete lack of snow whereas the Northeast had a major blizzard the 2nd week of March.

In DEN you can have 65 degree days in December, 80 degree days in February. How often does that happen in say NYC? Almost Never.
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