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Old 02-26-2021, 12:05 PM
 
1,446 posts, read 964,420 times
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Best take I have seen on a resolution for homeless is something this country would never do or have an almost impossible task of implementing and that is violating the homeless person’s civil rights.

They would need an intervention, taken to a facility that could get them to the clearest mind possible and then let them make choices of moving forward or being institutionalized because they are not capable of making a decision.

A friend of mine who is a first responder suggested this approach. He said 90% of all his calls now are for the homeless, in some cases odd reasons like wanting sandwich, can’t get into a shelter that night, etc. He said most of them are not of clear enough mind and in no way can they help themselves in their current state. Maybe it should be a civil right to be given a clear mind, at least for a bit? Just a thought.
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Old 02-28-2021, 03:36 PM
 
3 posts, read 993 times
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Originally Posted by COcheesehead View Post
They would need an intervention, taken to a facility that could get them to the clearest mind possible and then let them make choices of moving forward or being institutionalized because they are not capable of making a decision.
After seriously researching and dwelling on this topic today, I found this thread. Unfortunately, I think you are right. For the homeless that are hooked on drugs, without being detained and mandatorily detoxed these people will rarely choose to be clean and thus will always have clouded judgement.

A friend of mine that works in the department of corrections said he believes of the homeless people that find their way into prison, 50% are born with disability and 50% become disabled from "frying their brain" on the drugs they use. If we were to prevent 50 percent of homelessness by discouraging and treating drug addiction, we could easily and affordably assist the remaining 50% of homeless that are there due to no actions of their own.

There's a great documentary on my current city (Seattle) that discusses the challenges of drug use and homelessness in Seattle called "Seattle is Dying". If you haven't seen it, I would highly recommend it. I think a lot of the themes are consistent or slightly ahead of the other cities in the US facing homelessness issues.

At the conclusion of the documentary, a 2-phased facility is proposed - one half with mandatory detainment to get clean, and one half for a live-in short term housing with treatment while people get back on their feet, find work, etc. I strongly believe in a solution of this nature and all it would take is money to make it a reality. If the "Road Home" money was used for action instead of endless analysis I think we would have something like this in Denver already.

My 2 cents.
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Old 02-28-2021, 09:10 PM
 
96 posts, read 23,436 times
Reputation: 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by COcheesehead View Post
Best take I have seen on a resolution for homeless is something this country would never do or have an almost impossible task of implementing and that is violating the homeless person’s civil rights.

They would need an intervention, taken to a facility that could get them to the clearest mind possible and then let them make choices of moving forward or being institutionalized because they are not capable of making a decision.

A friend of mine who is a first responder suggested this approach. He said 90% of all his calls now are for the homeless, in some cases odd reasons like wanting sandwich, can’t get into a shelter that night, etc. He said most of them are not of clear enough mind and in no way can they help themselves in their current state. Maybe it should be a civil right to be given a clear mind, at least for a bit? Just a thought.
Good idea.

There should be a special police force too. Denver police only take calls, nobody is out on the street enforcing the laws which are painfully obviously being broken regarding camping and panhandling. If someone is panhandling on the side of the road there is no number to call. Give us a number to call and a van should be on scene within minutes to take this person somewhere. Giving someone 50 cents or whatever is almost like committing murder.
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Old 02-28-2021, 09:21 PM
 
96 posts, read 23,436 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FutureDenverRes View Post

At the conclusion of the documentary, a 2-phased facility is proposed - one half with mandatory detainment to get clean, and one half for a live-in short term housing with treatment while people get back on their feet, find work, etc. I strongly believe in a solution of this nature and all it would take is money to make it a reality. If the ”Road Home” money was used for action instead of endless analysis I think we would have something like this in Denver already.

My 2 cents.
They might as well just turn the Denver public library into some sort of facility like this. I’m actually glad the library here is disliked by the locals because of the homeless takeover, I honestly think we should all just give it to them. At the end of the day the people decide, and it’s clear the people don’t care.

I say do nothing, let it get worse...the people of Denver will get what they deserve in the end, just like seattleites deserve what they have. Seattle is way richer too.

The money is there, money is irrelevant. Something as simple as what I just proposed will go completely over the heads of most people.
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Old Yesterday, 11:37 AM
 
Location: Evanston, Lake Forest, and Wrigleyville, Illinois
2,518 posts, read 1,608,776 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Denverpro View Post
Good idea.

There should be a special police force too. Denver police only take calls, nobody is out on the street enforcing the laws which are painfully obviously being broken regarding camping and panhandling. If someone is panhandling on the side of the road there is no number to call. Give us a number to call and a van should be on scene within minutes to take this person somewhere. Giving someone 50 cents or whatever is almost like committing murder.
I can't really tell whether or not you are trying to make a joke or not—I think so. However, I am still going to note that panhandling is protected under the First Amendment. That is why police forces and local governments are so reluctant to enforce any rules that they have on the matter. The ACLU is more than ready to bring a lawsuit. There are also a lot of so-called liberal judges who have successfully tried to invalidate laws that make it a crime to sleep in public space and other anti-loitering laws.
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Old Today, 11:04 AM
 
961 posts, read 1,099,892 times
Reputation: 1160
Quote:
Originally Posted by FutureDenverRes View Post
At the conclusion of the documentary, a 2-phased facility is proposed - one half with mandatory detainment to get clean, and one half for a live-in short term housing with treatment while people get back on their feet, find work, etc. I strongly believe in a solution of this nature and all it would take is money to make it a reality. If the "Road Home" money was used for action instead of endless analysis I think we would have something like this in Denver already.

How does mandatory detainment work for addiction? Isn't that considered unconstitutional?


The other half is being worked on in Denver, as you said all it takes is money and quite a bit more than people think.
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Old Today, 04:21 PM
 
Location: Denver
3,911 posts, read 7,217,896 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wong21fr View Post
How does mandatory detainment work for addiction? Isn't that considered unconstitutional?


The other half is being worked on in Denver, as you said all it takes is money and quite a bit more than people think.
Anyone who has ever had any experience with addicts before knows what a terrible idea (not to mention unethical) forced rehab is.
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Old Today, 04:59 PM
 
96 posts, read 23,436 times
Reputation: 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hiruko View Post
I can't really tell whether or not you are trying to make a joke or not—I think so.
dead-serious.

Quote:
However, I am still going to note that panhandling is protected under the First Amendment. That is why police forces and local governments are so reluctant to enforce any rules that they have on the matter. The ACLU is more than ready to bring a lawsuit.
OK then, then let them panhandle and keep everything as-is, sorry for my ideas. I guess the thread can be closed now? Homeless-ness is here to stay!
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Old Today, 05:03 PM
 
96 posts, read 23,436 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Westerner92 View Post
Anyone who has ever had any experience with addicts before knows what a terrible idea (not to mention unethical) forced rehab is.
Who said anything about addicts? I think even after 1 use they should be contained. Perhaps outfit traffic cameras with sort of drug detection device, an alarm sounds, 2 minutes later a van shows up.
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Old Today, 08:11 PM
 
Location: Denver
3,911 posts, read 7,217,896 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Denverpro View Post
Who said anything about addicts? I think even after 1 use they should be contained. Perhaps outfit traffic cameras with sort of drug detection device, an alarm sounds, 2 minutes later a van shows up.
Sounds like an authoritarian dystopia. You could stand to use some drugs. Would alcohol (which is the strongest narcotic I’ve used of the many I’ve tried) be permitted in your government kidnapping system?
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