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Old 07-24-2009, 07:41 PM
 
Location: Tennessee bound...someday
2,514 posts, read 4,769,094 times
Reputation: 7128

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Legs1357 View Post
Not to stray completely off topic but don't you think that could have been interpreted as offensive by someone aware of the history of blackface in our country?

It's OK - I don't really think it is off-topic - it concerns children & teens & their comfort levels (for lack of a better term).

That's my point though - we, as adults, have a greater chance of viewing it that way - offensively. But these kids weren't tarnished
by the negative stigmas yet. IMO, they hadn't been "taught" that or shown that yet.

One of her friends in the group is African American and dressed as the most Scandinavian-looking girl you could imagine; long blond wig borrowed from one of the parents of another in the group, LOTS of makeup to look fairer. It was very impressive, and NO ONE took offense. Their school mates didn't find it offensive; they found it inventive! BTW, my niece did not don "blackface". She painstakingly applied her color to match her friend's skin tone. For these girls, there was nothing racist about it - it was a tribute to their friendship.
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Old 07-24-2009, 08:25 PM
 
65,949 posts, read 55,453,943 times
Reputation: 19613
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Very true. I believe many in the city of Denver go to High Schools like East, George Washington, Montbello and Manual.
Don Cheadle went to East High School.
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Old 07-24-2009, 09:15 PM
 
Location: Denver--->Atlanta--->DC
573 posts, read 2,410,774 times
Reputation: 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by piperspal View Post
It's OK - I don't really think it is off-topic - it concerns children & teens & their comfort levels (for lack of a better term).

That's my point though - we, as adults, have a greater chance of viewing it that way - offensively. But these kids weren't tarnished
by the negative stigmas yet. IMO, they hadn't been "taught" that or shown that yet.

One of her friends in the group is African American and dressed as the most Scandinavian-looking girl you could imagine; long blond wig borrowed from one of the parents of another in the group, LOTS of makeup to look fairer. It was very impressive, and NO ONE took offense. Their school mates didn't find it offensive; they found it inventive! BTW, my niece did not don "blackface". She painstakingly applied her color to match her friend's skin tone. For these girls, there was nothing racist about it - it was a tribute to their friendship.
Oh I'm sure their intentions were not negative at all, I was just pointing out that due to the painful history involving that, that some people would find it offensive regardless of the intent. I definitely would with older kids, but at age 13 I wouldn't think they would know/should be expected to know about it, I definitely didn't.
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Old 07-24-2009, 09:26 PM
 
Location: Tennessee bound...someday
2,514 posts, read 4,769,094 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by livecontent View Post
I have been in Denver for over 30 years and my experiences are much better today than my experiences in the past with race relation. It is because Denver is so much more a relaxed place to live. Also it partly because I am also a better person because I have had numerous more instances to interact with different people over my life.
livecontent
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Old 07-25-2009, 09:13 AM
 
Location: Denver, CO
3,530 posts, read 9,306,495 times
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Yep, Thornton. I agree, I'll take my own advice. As to the Reservoir, I tried, doesn't work. I'm better off saving and taking vacations twice a year.

Back to topic, some burbs really aren't for some people, and I'd hope the OP wouldn't judge all of Denver based on the particular area they moved to. Meaning, if you find yourself uncomfortable in your surroundings, racial or otherwise, keep looking, there are genuinely good areas here, some more diverse than others.

Quote:
Originally Posted by David Aguilar View Post
Thornton, right?

Yeah, I probably would grow tired of Thornton as well.

Maybe someday you can take your own advice and "just go somewhere else", your happy (Denver) place is out there somewhere, and being a "local" it shouldn't be hard for you to find it.

As for the sea, spend some summer days at Cherry Creek Reservoir, and do your best to convince yourself that it's really the ocean. I know, a stretch, but apparently there are people out there that have the ability to make mountains out of molehills.
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Old 07-25-2009, 09:17 AM
 
Location: Denver, CO
3,530 posts, read 9,306,495 times
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In my research and experience, I find that children only notice the difference when it's pointed out to them. Whether by their parents or outside influences, kids really do not notice different ethnicities until it's brought to their attention. There are numerous studies that show this.

What I meant by what people see is that I could just be a little bit brown and they see "black". My husband is half Puerto Rican, but because he is so light skinned people see "white". I've made the same mistake when traveling. Go to Mexico City and you'll see people that look as white as anything but are actually Mexican. Same with Spain.

Quote:
Originally Posted by piperspal View Post
And really, I bet most kids see it just that simply. A few years ago, one of my nieces who was 13 at the time, got together with 4 or 5 of her friends to come up with Halloween costumes. They decided to go as..EACH OTHER!! It was great! They were like a United Nations panel. They put on makeup to darken or lighten their skin; wigs to turn my Irish/Mexican fair-haired niece into sporting a fro. They wore each others shoes or clothes. They made a statement without even meaning to. Just celebrating differences!

Last edited by Mike from back east; 07-25-2009 at 09:58 AM..
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Old 07-25-2009, 10:16 AM
 
Location: Tennessee bound...someday
2,514 posts, read 4,769,094 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wanttomoveeast View Post
.......children only notice the difference when it's pointed out to them. Whether by their parents or outside influences, kids really do not notice different ethnicities until it's brought to their attention......
yep!
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Old 07-25-2009, 11:12 PM
 
Location: Aurora
357 posts, read 1,230,431 times
Reputation: 280
Quote:
Originally Posted by wanttomoveeast View Post
In my research and experience, I find that children only notice the difference when it's pointed out to them. Whether by their parents or outside influences, kids really do not notice different ethnicities until it's brought to their attention. There are numerous studies that show this.
that's not exactly true. they do see the differences and they want to know why people look different, but they don't really assign negative meaning to those differences until they're older. it's partially based on their environment (what they glean from outside sources, parents, etc) and also the fact that humans like to exclude those who are different. that difference can be hair color, texture, skin color, eye color, or even for kids, who wears and plays what.
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Old 07-26-2009, 12:10 AM
 
Location: Denver--->Atlanta--->DC
573 posts, read 2,410,774 times
Reputation: 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by LisaCACO View Post
that's not exactly true. they do see the differences and they want to know why people look different, but they don't really assign negative meaning to those differences until they're older. it's partially based on their environment (what they glean from outside sources, parents, etc) and also the fact that humans like to exclude those who are different. that difference can be hair color, texture, skin color, eye color, or even for kids, who wears and plays what.
Exactly. Kids as young as 3 will ask you why you look different from them, but have no social construct of race obviously.
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Old 07-26-2009, 12:49 AM
 
Location: Denver, CO
3,927 posts, read 7,305,450 times
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Right, young kids notice differences, but don't assign any meaning to it. It's when grown ups or other kids who are "taught" certain stereotypes that influence this, IMO. In many cases, negatively.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Legs1357 View Post
Exactly. Kids as young as 3 will ask you why you look different from them, but have no social construct of race obviously.
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