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Old 09-27-2016, 08:59 AM
 
Location: Southeast Michigan
2,852 posts, read 1,789,667 times
Reputation: 4526

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Geo-Aggie View Post
Sorry, I should've been more clear on that. Correct, I don't live within the Detroit city limits. I'm a couple miles north, but I spend time in Detroit for museums, restaurants, and sporting events. When people from outside of the state ask where I live, I don't tell them "Southeast Oakland County" because that would mean nothing to 95% of America. I'd tell them Detroit. My understanding of the study is that it looked at metro areas. Note two of the other metros are "Raleigh-Durham" and "Cleveland-Akron", to me this implies that "Detroit" means "Detroit-Livonia-Warren", but freaking out over a blurry definition works too, if that's your thing.

This doesn't change the point that this is good for Detroit, and the Detroit MSA, and the Detroit CSA, because what benefits Detroit benefits Warren, and Livonia, and Flint, and Ann Arbor - and visa versa. These cities aren't entirely economically disconnected, you know? If I earn a paycheck in Macomb County, but live in Oakland County and recreate in Wayne County, well... you can see where I'm going here.

Regarding raising a family within the city limits, I think plenty of people have successfully raised great families within the city limits. It's not necessarily for me for various reasons, but I see nothing wrong with it. Detroit still has its struggles and I prefer a city that already has good schools and where I can walk to the corner market at night with the perception of safety, while still maintaining affordability on a modest income. In time, Detroit can get there, and is currently getting there in parts, but the point of my post wasn't to talk about why I live in the suburbs, but rather to share a positive piece of information about Metro Detroit and its flagship city. Make sense?

It depends on how specific you need to be.

If I am on vacation somewhere and out of state, and someone asks me "So where are you from?" I will say, "Detroit". In this setting, it doesn't imply that I live in the City of Detroit. Only the general area. Just like someone living in, say, Norcross or Buckhead would likely tell you they are from Atlanta.

If I am talking to a Michigander, then I will tell them my exact township. Because in this setting, "Detroit" means Detroit.

And raising a family within city limits, while possible, is very expensive - most likely you will pay the cost of college before your kids ever make it to college. If you want them to get into a good college and want the school work for you, not against you.
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Old 09-27-2016, 09:08 AM
 
Location: Ann Arbor MI
2,105 posts, read 1,350,352 times
Reputation: 2905
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geo-Aggie View Post
I think the take-home message here is that you and I have very different personalities, and there's nothing wrong with that. If you want more clarity, ask for it. Making assumptions... well... you know the saying.
Fair enough. I just didn't think I needed clarity in your original post. I thought it was clear to me that you were talking about the city of Detroit, not SE Michigan. Obviously in hind-site I was wrong.
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Old 09-27-2016, 09:26 AM
 
12,825 posts, read 20,826,305 times
Reputation: 10931
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geo-Aggie View Post
This LinkedIn analysis looked at the search behaviors of Millennials (those born roughly between 1980-2000) on LinkedIn. What it found was a few surprises of cities that us younger folk are showing the greatest increased interest in moving to.

At #1 nobody should be surprised to see Austin, and Raleigh at #2 isn't a major shock either, but the Motor City comes in at #3 followed by another victim of industrial decline at #4.

I think it's easy to understand why this is happening. The cost of living in the prime destinations for young people is high. Stupidly high. I'm paid in the 80th percentile for people of my generation and there's no way in hell I could afford property within reasonable commute distance of NYC, DC, LA or SF/SJ (I can afford Chicago, but certainly not in parts I'd want to live). Things get a little better in our "2nd tier" cities, but even I'd have to make major sacrifices to afford somewhere to sleep in Denver, Seattle, Boston, Dallas, or Portland - so as us youngsters age and start having families and owning property, and we compare the quality of life 70k affords us in a city like Detroit vs. a city like LA, well ... Go Tigers!
Yep, the price is right and the positives of the Detroit conurbation are pretty good.
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Old 09-27-2016, 09:30 AM
 
Location: Ann Arbor MI
2,105 posts, read 1,350,352 times
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So I am curious, and don't think I'm trying to be an a$$hole, but for you "I'm (not actually) from Detroit" crowd how big does a city have to be for you to call it what it is?
Somebody mentioned Atlanta. So does Athens get its own recognition? Marietta?
Somebody mentioned LA. Lots of suburbs of LA. What suburbs of LA get their own identity?
Closer to home, what parts of SE Michigan would any of you call by name to an out of state person? Novi? Farmington? Dearborn?

again I'm not trying to be an a-hole I am curious how people think.
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Old 09-27-2016, 09:42 AM
 
2,469 posts, read 1,763,739 times
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I live in Detroit so I proudly tell people when on vacation where I live & I love the shock look in peoples face. Most people follow up with "where exactly in Detroit?" as in most people know by Detroit I mean greater Detroit. I then follow up by saying, "right in Detroit, few miles north of Downtown".

To me, Ann Arbor is the nearest city that gets its own recognition worth mentioning.
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Old 09-27-2016, 10:02 AM
 
Location: Ann Arbor MI
2,105 posts, read 1,350,352 times
Reputation: 2905
Quote:
Originally Posted by keraT View Post
I live in Detroit so I proudly tell people when on vacation where I live & I love the shock look in peoples face. Most people follow up with "where exactly in Detroit?" as in most people know by Detroit I mean greater Detroit. I then follow up by saying, "right in Detroit, few miles north of Downtown".
To me, Ann Arbor is the nearest city that gets its own recognition worth mentioning.
Thanks for the feedback. It raises another curiosity question...if you live east of Ann Arbor how east can one "claim" Ann Arbor before they surrender to Detroit? Belleville? Romulus? Van Buren Township?

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Old 09-27-2016, 10:38 AM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
27,759 posts, read 65,606,514 times
Reputation: 32943
Quote:
Originally Posted by craig11152 View Post
So I am curious, and don't think I'm trying to be an a$$hole, but for you "I'm (not actually) from Detroit" crowd how big does a city have to be for you to call it what it is?
Somebody mentioned Atlanta. So does Athens get its own recognition? Marietta?
Somebody mentioned LA. Lots of suburbs of LA. What suburbs of LA get their own identity?
Closer to home, what parts of SE Michigan would any of you call by name to an out of state person? Novi? Farmington? Dearborn?

again I'm not trying to be an a-hole I am curious how people think.
In L.A., pretty much Everything in the LA basin is described as LA. If someone says I am from Alhambra, that has no meaning. Santa Monica may get its own recognition. Maybe Pasadena because of the Rose Bowl. But those from South Pasadena also say Pasadena or LA to out of staters. Orange County is pretty much the same way. To out of staters, or even to North Cal people you just say I am from Orange County. Languna Beach and Newport beach might be exceptions if you are trying to impress with a prestigious address. If you say I am from Mission Veijo or Laguna Nigel, you will get a blank look until you clarify "Orange County" You may as well same time and just say Orange County to begin with.

I do not know Georgia well but I do know within our company projects in Athens, Marietta and other nearby cities are just referred to as the "(Company/Owner), Atlanta project."

The only Cities I would specify to out of Staters for metro Detroit are Ann Arbor, Flint, Windsor, and maybe Toledo if you count Toledo as being in the metro area. I would certainly say "Detroit" or "Detroit area" or "Near Detroit" for any place all the way out to Brighton, Fenton, Highland, and probably even down as far as Monroe. North, I would likely go as far as Port Huron, before I simply used "Thumb area" Then you have "in the middle," "Grand Rapids" and "Up north." For some people I might use "West Coast of Michigan" if it was not close to Grand Rapids. And of course the UP.

Likewise our relatives from Texas mostly live about 1 to 1.5 hours from Dallas, they still say Dallas or Dallas-Fort Worth. They would not say Valley View (a town of 280 people). No one, even from Texas, would know where it is. Relatives from Moline Illinois would not say Moline, no one knows where that is. Say Quad Cities, and most people will know. Even people from Long Grove IA or Oak grove IL will say Quad Cities even though they are nto one of the quad cities, but just in the area.

Airports tend to do the same thing. Detroit Airport is not in Detroit. It is not even that close. LAX is not in LA. I think this is a common practice with Airports a well as with people describing a general metro area.

Last edited by Coldjensens; 09-27-2016 at 10:46 AM..
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Old 09-27-2016, 10:38 AM
 
Location: Southeast Michigan
2,852 posts, read 1,789,667 times
Reputation: 4526
Quote:
Originally Posted by craig11152 View Post
So I am curious, and don't think I'm trying to be an a$$hole, but for you "I'm (not actually) from Detroit" crowd how big does a city have to be for you to call it what it is?
Somebody mentioned Atlanta. So does Athens get its own recognition? Marietta?
Somebody mentioned LA. Lots of suburbs of LA. What suburbs of LA get their own identity?
Closer to home, what parts of SE Michigan would any of you call by name to an out of state person? Novi? Farmington? Dearborn?

again I'm not trying to be an a-hole I am curious how people think.
It's really dependent on whether that smaller city is generally considered part of the larger Metro area.

And it's rather subjective.

To me, places like Milford and Holly would be borderline - small enough and just far enough that you could still say "I'm from Detroit," or expand it to "I live on the northern outskirts of Metro Detroit." OTOH Ann Arbor or Brighton or Howell probably are either too large or too far out.

E.g. if you met someone who told you they were from Dunwoody, GA would it tell you anything at all ? But if they told you they were from Atlanta, would you assume they lived in the City of Atlanta ? I know I wouldn't. Just like if someone is telling me they're from Chicago, in my mind it can mean anything from the Lakeshore Drive to Buffalo Grove.
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Old 09-27-2016, 11:29 AM
 
1,851 posts, read 2,294,950 times
Reputation: 1864
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geo-Aggie View Post
This LinkedIn analysis looked at the search behaviors of Millennials (those born roughly between 1980-2000) on LinkedIn. What it found was a few surprises of cities that us younger folk are showing the greatest increased interest in moving to.

At #1 nobody should be surprised to see Austin, and Raleigh at #2 isn't a major shock either, but the Motor City comes in at #3 followed by another victim of industrial decline at #4.

I think it's easy to understand why this is happening. The cost of living in the prime destinations for young people is high. Stupidly high. I'm paid in the 80th percentile for people of my generation and there's no way in hell I could afford property within reasonable commute distance of NYC, DC, LA or SF/SJ (I can afford Chicago, but certainly not in parts I'd want to live). Things get a little better in our "2nd tier" cities, but even I'd have to make major sacrifices to afford somewhere to sleep in Denver, Seattle, Boston, Dallas, or Portland - so as us youngsters age and start having families and owning property, and we compare the quality of life 70k affords us in a city like Detroit vs. a city like LA, well ... Go Tigers!
Back on topic, this is great news. Hopefully, there are a lot of high tech and engineering jobs in the metro area so that these job seekers can actually find employment here. We could use the infusion of youth and talent and motivated professionals. For decades now, so many of our brightest native millenials have gone on to live in more vibrant and growing cities like Chicago, LA, Atlanta, and Denver.
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Old 09-27-2016, 02:14 PM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
27,759 posts, read 65,606,514 times
Reputation: 32943
LA is not very vibrant.

Unless of course you mean the surrounding areas. LA itself is pretty Meh. It is getting better though.
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