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Old 05-15-2017, 09:15 AM
 
292 posts, read 205,069 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KP360 View Post
I grew up on the East Side of Detroit before leaving for college. Now I live in STL, MO but I'll soon be moving back to Detroit and I cannot wait!

My neighborhood was rough growing up and it still is today. The problem with Detroit (today), and this contributes to the racial divide as well, is the development or gentrification of Midtown and Downtown.
Gentrification is like a double edge sword. While you're cleaning up and fixing areas that were awful, you're also removing the residents who kept the place afloat. While new buildings and bike trails seem cool, $1250 rents and hipsters are not lol.

I love the development in my city. I just hope the city and urban planners can take that development and push it to other areas. Deep east and west side are warzones. Downtown and Midtown are basically suburbs. We need balance.



With a view like yours, you need to stay in St Louis. You label a whole east and west side by calling it a warzone. What specifically is the warzone, you can't get any deeper eastside than East English Village is that a "warzone" There are places and development happening everyday in the neighborhoods but of course you wouldn't really know it if you aren't there and it isn't on TV or in mainstream newspapers. Only in Detroit do people pick out the "good" areas and say it is not really Detroit. Thats like having a family and two of the children become Doctors and two become Lawyers and then a fifth becomes a school teacher and then the family says well the fifth is not really in our family
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Old 05-16-2017, 07:44 AM
 
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I'm not a Detroiter... I am aware there are large stretches (I would believe the majority of the east side) with serious problems, and places like East English Village are like oases in the desert.

I think the reason why "people pick out the "good" areas and say it is not really Detroit" because since the 1980s most of Detroit has been having problems (which is why the city is so starved of a tax base). It's possible larger proportions have been improving other than Downtown and Midtown, and it would be useful to show a map series reflecting median income, empty housing, school quality, and other indicators of quality of life so we can compare sections of Detroit and see how it progressed over time.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ekman243 View Post
With a view like yours, you need to stay in St Louis. You label a whole east and west side by calling it a warzone. What specifically is the warzone, you can't get any deeper eastside than East English Village is that a "warzone" There are places and development happening everyday in the neighborhoods but of course you wouldn't really know it if you aren't there and it isn't on TV or in mainstream newspapers. Only in Detroit do people pick out the "good" areas and say it is not really Detroit. Thats like having a family and two of the children become Doctors and two become Lawyers and then a fifth becomes a school teacher and then the family says well the fifth is not really in our family
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Old 05-16-2017, 07:51 AM
 
292 posts, read 205,069 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vicman View Post
I'm not a Detroiter... I am aware there are large stretches (I would believe the majority of the east side) with serious problems, and places like East English Village are like oases in the desert.

I think the reason why "people pick out the "good" areas and say it is not really Detroit" because since the 1980s most of Detroit has been having problems (which is why the city is so starved of a tax base). It's possible larger proportions have been improving other than Downtown and Midtown, and it would be useful to show a map series reflecting median income, empty housing, school quality, and other indicators of quality of life so we can compare sections of Detroit and see how it progressed over time.
Who is we, people who actually live and love Detroit ? Or is it people who live in such a 'great" area yet but for some reason they can't keep poor old Detroit out their mouths. Detroiters love where they live you should do the same. Unless............
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Old 05-16-2017, 08:23 AM
 
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"We" meaning the city-data readers.

I'm from Houston... it's got its share of scary neighborhoods, but it's economically healthy for one major reason: annexation. In Michigan Detroit was "trapped" by suburban municipalities and could no longer expand, so the tax base could move out. Houston, in Texas, was able to "annex" formerly unincorporated areas, and territories within its extraterritorial jurisdiction (ETJ) cannot form their own municipal governments without Houston's permission. Houston also does "limited purpose annexation" in which it annexes the businesses and gets tax money from them, but not the surrounding residential areas. This means it's much harder for the business funds to flee the city.

Perhaps one day the energy industry will radically change and Houston will experience a bust that makes the 80s look like a joke

Quote:
Originally Posted by ekman243 View Post
Who is we, people who actually live and love Detroit ? Or is it people who live in such a 'great" area yet but for some reason they can't keep poor old Detroit out their mouths. Detroiters love where they live you should do the same. Unless............
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Old 05-16-2017, 08:28 AM
 
292 posts, read 205,069 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vicman View Post
"We" meaning the city-data readers.

I'm from Houston... it's got its share of scary neighborhoods, but it's economically healthy for one major reason: annexation. In Michigan Detroit was "trapped" by suburban municipalities and could no longer expand, so the tax base could move out. Houston, in Texas, was able to "annex" formerly unincorporated areas, and territories within its extraterritorial jurisdiction (ETJ) cannot form their own municipal governments without Houston's permission. Houston also does "limited purpose annexation" in which it annexes the businesses and gets tax money from them, but not the surrounding residential areas. This means it's much harder for the business funds to flee the city.

Perhaps one day the energy industry will radically change and Houston will experience a bust that makes the 80s look like a joke


Are you typing from some dark basement or library
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Old 05-16-2017, 08:31 AM
 
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Originally Posted by ekman243 View Post
Are you typing from some dark basement or library
My apartment in Asia.
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Old 05-16-2017, 08:38 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Vicman View Post
My apartment in Asia.
How can you be bored in Asia, get out enjoy life
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Old 05-16-2017, 08:51 AM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
27,776 posts, read 65,692,477 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vicman View Post
"We" meaning the city-data readers.

I'm from Houston... it's got its share of scary neighborhoods, but it's economically healthy for one major reason: annexation. In Michigan Detroit was "trapped" by suburban municipalities and could no longer expand, so the tax base could move out. Houston, in Texas, was able to "annex" formerly unincorporated areas, and territories within its extraterritorial jurisdiction (ETJ) cannot form their own municipal governments without Houston's permission. Houston also does "limited purpose annexation" in which it annexes the businesses and gets tax money from them, but not the surrounding residential areas. This means it's much harder for the business funds to flee the city.

Perhaps one day the energy industry will radically change and Houston will experience a bust that makes the 80s look like a joke
Actually Detroit's current problem is they once did too much annexation. Population is too spread out. It i s impossible to concentrate services where the people are because they are scattered all over the place. Smaller geographic cities like Boston, Manhattan, Miami, or San Francisco do very well without annexation. In fact, I would much rather see Detroit become simlar to those cities than to Houston (which I find very lacking n any sort of history, spirit or soul, but obviously it has appeal to a large number of people who are not me and apparently have different prioities and preferences). Most sprawled out cities are like that. Bigger is not necessarily better. Look at Los Angeles. Geographically huge, very little to offer for its size (population).


Right now, to me Downtown and midtown Detrit are getting into the "just right" range: More places to visit that you can reasonably cover in a lifetime; amazing architecture and history; a nice eclectic mix of people; a spirited sense of community; amazing opportunities; improvement of some kind virtually every month; not crowded. If I were going to move into a City right now, anywhere in the USA, Detroit would be at or near the top of my list of choices.

It sill needs work. Infrastructure and schools are probably the top priority along with improvements to core neighborhoods.

It really needs to shed some of the outlying neighborhoods and concentrate the population if a way can be found to do that. The City lacks the resources to take care of such and expansive area.

I think I like Detroit so much in part for the same reason I like old houses. Every month or at least every year it gets better and better in leaps and bounds. If you were here last year, you can come again this year and visit/explore a whole new set of places or events that were not available last year. How many cities can say that?
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Old 05-16-2017, 08:57 AM
 
4,722 posts, read 8,577,534 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ekman243 View Post
How can you be bored in Asia, get out enjoy life
There's a 12 hour time diff. and its the workweek right now. There is lots to do though once the weekend comes

Quote:
Originally Posted by Coldjensens View Post
Actually Detroit's current problem is they once did too much annexation. Population is too spread out. It i s impossible to concentrate services where the people are because they are scattered all over the place. Smaller geographic cities like Boston, Manhattan, Miami, or San Francisco do very well without annexation. In fact, I would much rather see Detroit become simlar to those cities than to Houston (which I find very lacking n any sort of history, spirit or soul, but obviously it has appeal to a large number of people who are not me and apparently have different prioities and preferences). Most sprawled out cities are like that. Bigger is not necessarily better. Look at Los Angeles. Geographically huge, very little to offer for its size (population).
I wonder what the metro area would look like if those areas weren't annexed. The central city would be healthier today, but I wonder if the smaller municipalities would be wildly struggling...

Last edited by Vicman; 05-16-2017 at 09:11 AM..
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Old 05-16-2017, 10:39 AM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
27,776 posts, read 65,692,477 times
Reputation: 32973
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vicman View Post
There's a 12 hour time diff. and its the workweek right now. There is lots to do though once the weekend comes



I wonder what the metro area would look like if those areas weren't annexed. The central city would be healthier today, but I wonder if the smaller municipalities would be wildly struggling...
I do not know, but my brother claims annexation destroyed the cities of Redford and Del Rey. I think there were some others too. Actually he claims everything that got annexed got destroyed. He is a pretty smart guy, so I suspect he may be correct, I just know nothing about that part of the history of the city. Until recently if you compared Old Redford to Redford Township, it certainly looked like annexation was extremely detrimental, but who knows how Redford would have done it is stayed with the township and remained separate from Detroit. Likely there will be someone on CD who either has some knowlege of this, or at least opinions (with or without knowledge).
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