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Old 11-18-2016, 11:42 AM
 
Location: Detroit
3,671 posts, read 4,810,585 times
Reputation: 2624

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Geo-Aggie View Post
Can I point out how much it blew my mind upon moving here that you have video rental stores??!? I don't think I'd rented a movie since probably 2008 - except maybe a time or two at a Redbox. Not because I don't want to, but rather because there's no where to do so in Utah. Here there's a Family Video in every town! Good for them for weathering the downfall of an industry that took giants like Blockbuster and Hollywood Video with it.
Lol it used to be alot more than that. It seemed like it was on just about every corner when I was little.
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Old 11-27-2016, 05:57 PM
 
142 posts, read 118,044 times
Reputation: 162
Southfield and Farmington Hills

Southfield was a very modern city in the 1960s and even the 1970s. But its pretty much built up now with very little room to add anything new. The majority of its neighborhoods are tired. Streets filled with houses that have faded aluminum siding, old, dirty, faded garage doors, dirty windows, no landscaping, etc. The neighborhoods are very run-down. A lot of the commercial strips are tired and need updating. The apartments are not appealing at all. The large cluster of buildings near 9 mile/Providence are just as run down as the single-family neighborhoods. There are a lot of hotels in the city, and some have a lot of rowdiness or crime (Marvins Gardens, Victory Inn, even the Hawthorn Suites have issues with safety and crime). Telegraph was a dynamic commercial road that is now an outdated has-been with awful traffic.
Farmington Hills is also losing its luster. Same problems. Aging neighborhoods where many houses are poorly maintained. Old commercial centers that are looking shabby. Higher vacancy rates. They demolished the run-down Hamilton building and will be replacing it with hotels, even though there isnt any tourism in that area and not enough business to warrant more lodging that whats already there-and over-represented. The south side has some truly run-down areas, like mobile home parks where youre likely to find unemployed drunks and crackheads. Grand River has some real bleak looking stretches. The city has a great reputation but is fading fast.
Troy and Novi have very highly-regarded schools, so those cities continue to see tremendous growth and redevelopment. Housing prices seem high there but you are paying for the schools.Troy has a lot of rezoning and older neighborhoods being redeveloped, or homes on larger tracts being demolished to make way for lot splits and new subs.
Despite its low crime and good schools, Sterling Heights might be on the list too. Much of the older (1960s-70s) housing stock has fallen victim to poor upkeep. The houses look outdated and neglected, especially farther south. Many of the houses are similar to what you would see in neighboring Troy, but in noticeably worse condition. A few of the apartment complexes look downright ghetto and there are some commercial strips that badly need a makeover. Like Southfield and Farmington Hills, there isnt much room left to build new housing. There are still a lot of nice-looking neighborhoods, but there are a lot of signs there of a city on the decline. All of the main roads, overbuilt with commercial and industrial buildings, are just ugly and lacking in any character or interesting scenery. That lack of beauty and careless land use will turn off a lot of prospective residents. Troy has gotten bad, too, in becoming a cookie-cutter suburb but its not as run down as parts of Sterling Heights so it will probably hold on for a little longer even if suburbs become passe and future generations become more urban-centric. Troy is also aided by its closer proximity to Birmingham and Royal Oak, while Sterling Heights is a little too far and its being in another county also disconnects it socially. Likewise, Northville helps Novi due to location. But downtown Farmington is not enough of a draw to keep Farmington Hills from its noticeable decline.
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Old 11-28-2016, 01:49 PM
 
1,851 posts, read 2,299,897 times
Reputation: 1864
Quote:
Originally Posted by slowdawg View Post
Southfield ... The majority of its neighborhoods are tired. Streets filled with houses that have faded aluminum siding, old, dirty, faded garage doors, dirty windows, no landscaping, etc. The neighborhoods are very run-down.
Beautiful well-kept suburban neighborhood

Nice non-subdivision suburban neighborhood

Run-down? Hyperbole.

This is what run-down is:
https://www.google.com/maps/@42.3955...7i13312!8i6656

Quote:
Originally Posted by slowdawg View Post
Southfield. A lot of the commercial strips are tired and need updating.
You mean like this updated commercial strip

and this updated commercial strip

Quote:
Originally Posted by slowdawg View Post
The large cluster of buildings near 9 mile/Providence are just as run down as the single-family neighborhoods.
You are correct, the commercial/high-apartment district around the shuttered Northland Mall looks pretty bad for a suburb. The 12 Mile/Greenfield and the "John Grace" community also look less than stellar, but they do not represent the majority of Southfield.
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Old 11-28-2016, 03:44 PM
 
142 posts, read 118,044 times
Reputation: 162
Quote:
Originally Posted by usroute10 View Post
Beautiful well-kept suburban neighborhood

Nice non-subdivision suburban neighborhood

Run-down? Hyperbole.

This is what run-down is:
https://www.google.com/maps/@42.3955...7i13312!8i6656



You mean like this updated commercial strip

and this updated commercial strip



You are correct, the commercial/high-apartment district around the shuttered Northland Mall looks pretty bad for a suburb. The 12 Mile/Greenfield and the "John Grace" community also look less than stellar, but they do not represent the majority of Southfield.
Southfield is still a beautiful city in many ways. They have done a great job on controlling the development. You will not see a road like 9 Mile in Sterling Heights or Troy. The city would have rezoned it to commercial or high density and all the houses on large lots would have been bulldozed to make way for the kind of soul-less commercial buildings or condos youll see along Rochester or Van Dyke.Many of the old neighborhoods of Southfield have large, treed lots and the city has preserved the character well. However, the building frenzy of the 1960s brought a lot of new development that has not aged well. Many hotels, for example, which often serve as party pads or prostitution dens. Many high rise apartments that were contemporary in the 1960s but now outdated and dirty.
The neighborhood south of 10 Mile and north of Mt Vernon, between Greenfield and Southfield, was a typical modern neighborhood in the early 1970s. Now, a ton of houses in there need a serious makeover. Architecturally, there are some really cool houses north of Mt Vernon and West of Southfield, and many of those badly need a lot of renovation. There are large, interesting houses that are falling apart and have broken down cars rotting in the driveways. The area near Westbrook/Rock Creek also has many houses that are neglected. MANY of the homes near 12 Mile/Evergreen (Lacrosse, Roseland) are in a state of neglect. There is a bit of blight in the old neighborhood between 8-9 Mile, Lahser and Evergreen (Melrose, Mada, Prescott) as well, which has kept housing values lower there.
Southfield has better long-term planning with land-use, but during the boom years, they allowed a lot of construction projects and residential neighborhoods that have not aged well.
Add to that the decrease in school quality and I would say that Southfield is showing serious signs of decline.
Why does Southfield need so many hotels anyway? Thats usually a losing proposition. Its just not a tourist town and there arent enough large businesses to warrant the amount of lodging that Southfield has, and thats usually a risky move.
Anyway, I will stand by my premise that its a declining city. It was a modern "city of the future" during the 1960s-70s, but many of the houses and buildings have not been updated since then and are trying to survive off a reputation of modern luxury from 30 years ago.
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