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Old 10-21-2016, 10:44 AM
 
4,020 posts, read 2,925,769 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jonnynonos View Post
The only one I'm qualified to opine on is Livonia, to which I would say you are generally correct. Is it "bad"? No.
I actually haven't offered an opinion on Livonia mainly because I don't know enough about it to say either way. I do know that the big box stores in Livonia leave a bit to be desired today (especially the mall on 7 mile which just looks depressing once you step inside, but, hey, it has a Sanders so that's something?) but have no idea what they were like ten, twenty or thirty years ago.
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Old 10-21-2016, 10:55 AM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
27,759 posts, read 65,597,364 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jonnynonos View Post
Yes, so what you are saying is that if you look at them in the context of 2008-present, they are on the upswing.

If you look at them from likely any other standardized period in 5 year increments (10, 15, 20, 25, 30 etc.) they are likely on the downswing.

To demonstrate the validity of your observation, I will point out that talking about, for example, stock funds in such a manner by an asset manager would be in many cases illegal.

Meaning a firm can't say "We have generated 599% returns since 2007! Give us your money!" Without extensive context and disclaimers etc.

That is because that kind of data cherry picking is pretty considered useless.

The main reason that Detroit's inner ring suburbs will continue to decline is that 1) they have been declining 2) there is no impetus whatsoever to stop the decline
This seems to be the result of confusion between the words "were" and "are". It think it must be an ESL issue.

Now we are suddenly discussing inner ring suburbs? Perhaps the term "premier" is also a problem. Other than the Grosse Pointes there are no premier suburbs that re inner ring, unless you get into discussing Dearborn, which has not been "premier" for quite a while, but is working its way back there. Again "was" and "is" different meaning. "Were" and "are" are also words with completely different meaning. Google the words and you can get a definition.
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Old 10-21-2016, 11:27 AM
 
2,173 posts, read 2,817,432 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by highlanderfil View Post
I actually haven't offered an opinion on Livonia mainly because I don't know enough about it to say either way. I do know that the big box stores in Livonia leave a bit to be desired today (especially the mall on 7 mile which just looks depressing once you step inside, but, hey, it has a Sanders so that's something?) but have no idea what they were like ten, twenty or thirty years ago.
Which mall on 7 Mile? Livonia Mall? That closed and was torn down more than 5 years ago. It has been replaced with a mixed-use outdoor mall that looks quite nice and is adding new tenants.
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Old 10-21-2016, 11:53 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Arthur Digby Sellers View Post
Which mall on 7 Mile? Livonia Mall? That closed and was torn down more than 5 years ago. It has been replaced with a mixed-use outdoor mall that looks quite nice and is adding new tenants.
My mistake, it's on 6 mile. Laurel Park Place.
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Old 10-21-2016, 12:51 PM
 
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That's one of the beauty of Detroit suburbs is there's an elite suburb in each quadrant of town.

If your job center is in Auburn Hills - you can live in Rochester Hills.

If your job center is in Troy - you can live in Birmingham.

If your job center is in Detroit - you can live in Grosse Pointe.

If your job center is in Southfield - you can live in Northville.

Of course you can live in many other nice towns and even in each of the aforementioned cities and commute across the region - but it is a perk to living in Metro Detroit that wherever your job center is - you're never more than a 10-15 minute commute from the elite suburbs. And everything in between is also within a 15 minute drive.
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Old 10-21-2016, 12:51 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by highlanderfil View Post
My mistake, it's on 6 mile. Laurel Park Place.
The food court at Laurel Park is pretty depressing, but the rest of the mall is occupied with tenants. And it has some higher end anchor stores like Von Maur. It's not 12 Oaks, but I have seen malls in far worse condition.
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Old 10-21-2016, 01:17 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Arthur Digby Sellers View Post
The food court at Laurel Park is pretty depressing, but the rest of the mall is occupied with tenants. And it has some higher end anchor stores like Von Maur. It's not 12 Oaks, but I have seen malls in far worse condition.
Oakland Mall comes to mind. But, still, the quality of stores is behind even Fairlane.
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Old 10-21-2016, 01:27 PM
 
2,952 posts, read 4,347,967 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coldjensens View Post
This seems to be the result of confusion between the words "were" and "are". It think it must be an ESL issue.

Now we are suddenly discussing inner ring suburbs? Perhaps the term "premier" is also a problem. Other than the Grosse Pointes there are no premier suburbs that re inner ring, unless you get into discussing Dearborn, which has not been "premier" for quite a while, but is working its way back there. Again "was" and "is" different meaning. "Were" and "are" are also words with completely different meaning. Google the words and you can get a definition.
Good point about "premier," but I think the inner ring suburbs suggest a pattern for the region as a whole, at least what I call "metro Detroit."

LOL...by your logic we could parce it down to how its trended for a month and then say THAT's the trajectory.

If you want to think that the inner ring suburbs, after decades of blanket net population loss, have now adjusted and are positioned for a long-term upward trajectory, I would like to know: why? What do you see this wheel of change turning on?

I would also advise you to look up the phrase "dead cat bounce."
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Old 10-21-2016, 02:37 PM
 
1,648 posts, read 2,743,997 times
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Not all population loss is a negative. Use Ferndale as an example.

Through the 60's/70's Ferndale was a middle class suburb. As gentrification took over and Ferndale became the epicenter of the LGBT community, the overall population of Ferndale would have decreased, but the housing prices and quality of downtown options/viability of living there has become much more attractive with a smaller resident base.

Thus even if Ferndale schools aren't "Top Ten" - it's not a deterrent because many people choosing to live in Ferndale have no interest in the schools and thus housing prices maintain values/increase.

Similarly there will always be demand from people for Midtown/Downtown housing options because they want the walkability/urban experience and couldn't care less what happens at Six Mile/Evergreen.
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Old 10-22-2016, 08:48 AM
 
2,469 posts, read 1,762,876 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brodie734 View Post
Some young adults who grew up in sterile communities designed around the car and lacking any kind of public spaces are willing to trade square footage for urbanization. Just like their parents decided that cramped 900 sq ft bungalows in cities were too small and that every member of the household needed the equivalent of a studio apartment to themselves.
I love the circle of life. It is so beautiful. I am sure these urbanized young adults might raise their kids in 1000 sqft bungalow in Royal oak will have kids craving for large place when they grow up.
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