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Old 03-10-2017, 02:23 PM
 
384 posts, read 288,451 times
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I was told by someone there that Detroit is making a comeback? I still wondered from where or what? Another car making operations there in MI moved to another state (I think TN recently). The Belle Isle area has lots of new construction going on. I think a city can make a comeback without a specific industry. Baltimore seem to be progressing without a specific industry. I'm not even sure what Baltimore is known for as far as industry goes, it's pretty generic like any other city except the yuppies moving in are making housing prices higher and so it appears as if the city is actually making a comeback due to that alone.

Here in MD, people in Montgomery and Prince George's county mostly work in the medical field in DC, they bring their 6 figure income to MD to buy those McMansions. That's why these counties are "booming", not because they have an industry going on. It's a boring generic county filled with suburbs. I think same is happening in Baltimore. The resources are coming from outside plus it's not the locals that are making the change in Baltimore, it's the ones fresh off the boat.
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Old 03-10-2017, 02:30 PM
 
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what neighborhood is Belle Isle in? There are huge mansions across the street, I wonder if those are abandoned? They look well maintained except no cars are parked on the streets.

Quote:
Originally Posted by usroute10 View Post
You are almost right. The majority of Southwest Detroit is pretty diverse, except the "dogleg" part of Detroit, which is officially called Boynton (it's where Ben Carson grew up!). Boynton, sandwiched between heavy industrial, Melvindale, and River Rouge, is about 100% black! It is a small enclave of unremarkable housing stock and the main commercial street, Fort Street, is pretty dead, although it has one of the greatest bakeries in the metro area:

People's Brother's Bakery reviews on Yelp

People's Brothers Bakery Facebook


See Boynton in the far extreme southwest portion of Southwest Detroit.


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Other diverse suburbs of Detroit include River Rouge and Lincoln Park (white, black, Hispanic), West Bloomfield (white, black, Jewish, Chaldean, Asian), Pontiac (white, black, Hispanic), and Troy (white, Asian).
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Old 03-10-2017, 04:01 PM
 
Location: Chicago
939 posts, read 844,589 times
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Detroit is recovering, but you have to understand that it is recovering from a relatively unprecedented decline. Detroit saw successive waves of white and black flight and the character of the city has changed so dramatically that very little of it's pre-decline social character exists. Neighborhoods with evocative names like "Poletown" are empty husks, not little ethnic enclaves. The closest that you'll get is Corktown, one of the booming and hip parts of the city, that still has something of an Irish character about it... but in the same way that Ukrainian Village in Chicago isn't really a Ukrainian enclave. The loss of two thirds of the population has lead to a severe deterioration of the built environment... there are dilapidated houses and vacant lots even in the best parts of town.

Detroit is coming back because it's unique and interesting and, frankly, something of a blank slate for businesses and would-be gentrifiers. It is also experiencing an economic resurgence buoyed by a streamlined auto industry and investments from mortgage and tech companies. Downtown, Midtown, Corktown and New Center provide an urban experience that is similar to most other cities, but the surrounding neighborhoods are still reeling more or less. I don't know that there exists much real hope for places on the margins in Detroit today, but any recovery at all is welcome news.
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Old 03-10-2017, 06:08 PM
 
1,851 posts, read 2,296,049 times
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Originally Posted by brodie734 View Post
Downtown, Midtown, Corktown and New Center provide an urban experience that is similar to most other cities, but the surrounding neighborhoods are still reeling more or less. I don't know that there exists much real hope for places on the margins in Detroit today, but any recovery at all is welcome news.
Places on the periphery of Detroit that may be turning around include Jefferson-Chalmers (far southeast side), Old Redford (far northwest side), the Palmer Park Apartments District and the University Commons area (more specifically, the Avenue of Fashion commercial strip and the area between Marygrove College and University of Detroit).

Also, Eastern Market and "the Villages" area near Belle Isle seems to taking off. Every 2 to 3 months, a new business is opening up:

West Village (all articles within the last few weeks)

West Village Wine Bar & Charcuterie Shop Starts Cracking Open Bottles This Month

French Cafe Reviving Corner Storefront in West Village

Metropolis Cycles to pop-up, then open a second storefront in West Village

Live Cycle Delight fitness center set to open in Detroit's West Village

Eastern Market - can't keep up
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Old 03-10-2017, 06:33 PM
 
1,851 posts, read 2,296,049 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethnicappalachian View Post
what neighborhood is Belle Isle in? There are huge mansions across the street, I wonder if those are abandoned? They look well maintained except no cars are parked on the streets.
The Villages area. Maybe 1 or 2 mansions on East Jefferson are empty, I'm not sure, but the neighborhood behind those mansions, West Village and Indian Village, are expensive to live in if you are looking to buy.

I would still look into the eastern half of Warrendale. Because the housing stock is mediocre, you can get a LIVABLE house that you could move into for $15-20,000. For instance:

7711 Brace St, Detroit MI 48228 - MLS# 217015558

7258 Asbury Park, Detroit MI 48228 - MLS# 217017089

Heck, here is a house in one of Detroit's premier neighborhood (GRANDMONT), only $33,000. It looks like it's in good shape too, but who knows until you see it in person.

13985 Woodmont, Detroit MI 48227 - MLS# 216096266

Google Maps Streetview of the street it's on
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Old 03-15-2017, 12:06 PM
 
384 posts, read 288,451 times
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Is it unusual that one of the listed properties in Hamtramck can only be shown to me as a "drive-by showing", and not inside the house. Isn't this strange?

I believe I may be provided with some kind of code box key to enter the property? Since nobody buys a house without seeing what's inside...

Last edited by ethnicappalachian; 03-15-2017 at 01:33 PM..
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Old 03-15-2017, 05:35 PM
 
Location: Michigan
4,571 posts, read 7,269,198 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethnicappalachian View Post
Is it unusual that one of the listed properties in Hamtramck can only be shown to me as a "drive-by showing", and not inside the house. Isn't this strange?

I believe I may be provided with some kind of code box key to enter the property? Since nobody buys a house without seeing what's inside...
The house is probably still occupied by a tenant or already gutted out. Again, those sort of homes are bought by investors and people looking to do extensive rehab work.
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Old 03-15-2017, 09:48 PM
 
142 posts, read 117,791 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coldjensens View Post
I have always seen Detroit metro as very non-diverse. Instead it is very segregated. Blacks in certain cities, middle easterners in Dearborn. Hispanic in the Mexican Villiage, Chaldeans in (I forget), Koreans in certain parts of West Bloomfield; Indians in Canton and Novi; etc. There are a few suburbs that are fairly mixed (Ferndale, Ecorse, to some extent Novi). But for the most part it seems unusually segregated here to me.
Things have changed a lot. The depopulation of the city proper has resulted in increased black populations everywhere, particularly inner-ring suburbs. Roseville and Warrens south side have a large black presence. Eastpointe is heavily black. Mount Clemens has always had a sizable black population. Clinton Twp has a lot of blacks as a result of its location near Mt clemens and Roseville, plus an Italian population consistent with Macomb County as a whole. Sterling Heights and Warrens north end are heavily Chaldean. Troy, at one point, had the largest Asian population in the area. There is a Hindu temple there and some street blocks are majority Indian. North Madison Heights has a tight Vietnamese community-Vietnamese bakeries, salons, etc.Some plazas along John R and Dequindre near 13 Mile almost exclusively serve the Vietnamese population. Pontiac has a large black population as well as a huge Hispanic community, especially on the north end. Many have relocated to Auburn Hills and Waterford. West Bloomfield is heavily Jewish and Chaldean. Rochester Hills mirrors Troy to an extent. Novi had a lot of Japanese families last I knew. Southfield is around 75% black as well, with a section on the far east border being Orthodox Jewish.
Remember, when minority-majority cities like Detroit and Pontiac start losing a lot of its population, those who left have to go somewhere, right? They move to nearby cities, and diversify them. Likewise,when a few people from certain communities move to an area, they spread the word and encourage others to move nearby. The Indian community does this. They meet a few fellow expats, and buy homes in the neighborhoods they live in. New ethnic communities are growing in suburbia for sure.
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Old 03-16-2017, 07:13 AM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
27,762 posts, read 65,624,571 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slowdawg View Post
Things have changed a lot. The depopulation of the city proper has resulted in increased black populations everywhere, particularly inner-ring suburbs. Roseville and Warrens south side have a large black presence. Eastpointe is heavily black. Mount Clemens has always had a sizable black population. Clinton Twp has a lot of blacks as a result of its location near Mt clemens and Roseville, plus an Italian population consistent with Macomb County as a whole. Sterling Heights and Warrens north end are heavily Chaldean. Troy, at one point, had the largest Asian population in the area. There is a Hindu temple there and some street blocks are majority Indian. North Madison Heights has a tight Vietnamese community-Vietnamese bakeries, salons, etc.Some plazas along John R and Dequindre near 13 Mile almost exclusively serve the Vietnamese population. Pontiac has a large black population as well as a huge Hispanic community, especially on the north end. Many have relocated to Auburn Hills and Waterford. West Bloomfield is heavily Jewish and Chaldean. Rochester Hills mirrors Troy to an extent. Novi had a lot of Japanese families last I knew. Southfield is around 75% black as well, with a section on the far east border being Orthodox Jewish.
Remember, when minority-majority cities like Detroit and Pontiac start losing a lot of its population, those who left have to go somewhere, right? They move to nearby cities, and diversify them. Likewise,when a few people from certain communities move to an area, they spread the word and encourage others to move nearby. The Indian community does this. They meet a few fellow expats, and buy homes in the neighborhoods they live in. New ethnic communities are growing in suburbia for sure.
YEs, but they remain segregated. Southfiled is a perfect example. It did not become a diverse community, it became a 75% black community with the balance being mostly jewish. We do not seem to mix here. Everyone lives in clusters.
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Old 03-16-2017, 10:17 AM
 
Location: Chicago
939 posts, read 844,589 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by usroute10 View Post
Places on the periphery of Detroit that may be turning around include Jefferson-Chalmers (far southeast side), Old Redford (far northwest side), the Palmer Park Apartments District and the University Commons area (more specifically, the Avenue of Fashion commercial strip and the area between Marygrove College and University of Detroit).

Also, Eastern Market and "the Villages" area near Belle Isle seems to taking off. Every 2 to 3 months, a new business is opening up:
Some places, those with solid bones like Old Redford, are coming back in small ways, sure. Old Redford is now able to compete with neighboring areas like Redford Township or places like Inkster for lower middle-class and working-class residents. That is an improvement from the end of the financial crisis, but it is more of a return to form from the 90s and early 2000s.

I would still say that the OP is looking for an urban atmosphere in Detroit that no longer exists and has not existed since the 1980s. Hamtramck is as close as you can get to the kind of neighborhood he seems to be looking for, somewhere dense and steeped in neighborhood tradition and ethnic multiculturalism. You could probably find that in areas of Dearborn as well, with better schools if that is a concern. But for the most part Detroit is a series of racially segregated and economically stratified areas with much of the traces of its pre decline culture hard to find. And I am including the culture that developed after white flight but before the recession and massive black flight. Many of the solid middle-class to lower middle class neighborhoods that unfairly maligned by prejudiced suburbanites were the hardest hit by the population loss in the 2000s and a lot of culture and urban fabric went with those residents.
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