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Old 02-28-2017, 11:50 AM
 
148 posts, read 216,875 times
Reputation: 339

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Indentured Servant View Post
Oh.....please don't turn Detroit into a country farm
I know there are a contingent of people who feel this way and especially those who see farming as a step backward to a time when they were "poor" and whatnot, but considering that you have a densely-populated area which happens to have a vast surplus of vacant land, and the fact that there are miles and miles of your city that are food deserts and literally thousands upon thousands of people there with little to no access to healthy food, and all the disease and suffering caused by that, I find this idea indefensible.
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Old 02-28-2017, 12:24 PM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
27,759 posts, read 65,567,547 times
Reputation: 32923
The problems with farming in Cetroit are:

1. You may well encounter foundations, rubble, trash, hazardous materials, old fences all kinds of problematic stuff in the ground.

2. We may have a dry month and you will need to figure out how to water your "farm" without busting the bank.

3. In many places the soils is hard clay and it is difficult to get anything to grow. This depends on where you are. At my house, the soil is basically potting clay, at my Dad's it is rich loamy dirt where everything grows like mad (especially weeds).

4. Your produce will get stolen or eaten by wild animals. You can fence it in, but the fence might get stolen.

5. There may be some limitations. Most places allow chickens and gardens. Some limit the number of chickens and/or prohibit roosters. For us keeping them alive was a bigger problem than regulations. If you garden adjoining land that is not yours, do not be surprised if the owner shows up at harvest time and claims everything. Best to make arrangements.

6. It is usually not economically practical. In most cases it would be cheaper to take the same amount of money and buy produce grown on a real farm. Economies of scale and all that. The "farms" inside the city get by because they get subsidies or donations.

7. You will have to be very careful where you grow pot. If you grow it outdoors, someone will find it and it iwll disappear. There is really nothing you can do. Indoors with hydroponics and grow lights, you can do well, but your electric bill will go through the roof. That is how they find the illegal growing operations.
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Old 02-28-2017, 12:37 PM
 
Location: NYC & Media PA
363 posts, read 224,647 times
Reputation: 265
Funny this is the exact area I was speaking of

Quote:
Originally Posted by Coldjensens View Post
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Old 02-28-2017, 01:10 PM
 
148 posts, read 216,875 times
Reputation: 339
Quote:
Originally Posted by goofy328 View Post
No. But visit first. And spend some real time there, not just a weekend but several weeks, or a month or two. You'll never know what it's like living vicariously through internet forums and talking to locals. Get a feel for the place. It is very, very, large. Still urban, but very spread out.

Listen to what people on this forum are talking about. Detroit is NOT what you are thinking that it will be. Parts of it are like the Bronx in the seventies. Other parts are like Baltimore, Camden, etc. It is not a run down city in Connecticut or New York. Something entirely different.

The Detroit I knew, was fast, materialistic, ran down, abandoned properties, abandoned high rises, abandoned neighborhoods, partially torn down buildings, gun shots at odd hours during the day and throughout the night. I felt under dressed and totally out of my element. And there weren't a lot of people walking around. That was 20 years ago; I'm sure some neighborhoods may have improved, some may be worse, whatever. You can't just fix up your house, restore it to original condition, when you have other properties in disarray that need attention bringing down the value.
Don't worry, we would never move without visiting first. We're planning to come out for a couple weeks this spring as a preliminary.

And we have no designs on restoring anything to its original condition. I see a lot of people get into trouble that way. They buy a house that they see as greatly undervalued, but then the repairs and upgrades go for market rates. Defeats the purpose of getting a cheap house in the first place and especially, like you said, when other properties are in disarray around it.
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Old 02-28-2017, 01:10 PM
 
12,486 posts, read 7,585,778 times
Reputation: 4755
Quote:
Originally Posted by FriendOfWaffles View Post
I know there are a contingent of people who feel this way and especially those who see farming as a step backward to a time when they were "poor" and whatnot, but considering that you have a densely-populated area which happens to have a vast surplus of vacant land, and the fact that there are miles and miles of your city that are food deserts and literally thousands upon thousands of people there with little to no access to healthy food, and all the disease and suffering caused by that, I find this idea indefensible.
Yeah....but that it really not the solution to food deserts. I think eventually, as a city, you want that land to be developed. I mean.....if the city wants to rezone a particular area of the city to farming, that is one thing, but seeing livestock in the yards of homes, the smell and the like.....you can miss Detroit with that one.
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Old 02-28-2017, 01:18 PM
 
148 posts, read 216,875 times
Reputation: 339
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coldjensens View Post
The problems with farming in Cetroit are:

1. You may well encounter foundations, rubble, trash, hazardous materials, old fences all kinds of problematic stuff in the ground.

2. We may have a dry month and you will need to figure out how to water your "farm" without busting the bank.

3. In many places the soils is hard clay and it is difficult to get anything to grow. This depends on where you are. At my house, the soil is basically potting clay, at my Dad's it is rich loamy dirt where everything grows like mad (especially weeds).

4. Your produce will get stolen or eaten by wild animals. You can fence it in, but the fence might get stolen.

5. There may be some limitations. Most places allow chickens and gardens. Some limit the number of chickens and/or prohibit roosters. For us keeping them alive was a bigger problem than regulations. If you garden adjoining land that is not yours, do not be surprised if the owner shows up at harvest time and claims everything. Best to make arrangements.

6. It is usually not economically practical. In most cases it would be cheaper to take the same amount of money and buy produce grown on a real farm. Economies of scale and all that. The "farms" inside the city get by because they get subsidies or donations.

7. You will have to be very careful where you grow pot. If you grow it outdoors, someone will find it and it iwll disappear. There is really nothing you can do. Indoors with hydroponics and grow lights, you can do well, but your electric bill will go through the roof. That is how they find the illegal growing operations.

Ok, so foundations, rubble, trash, all that, definitely a possibility to contend with. Mostly any vacant land I would want to use for chicken, goats (if keeping them becomes legal) maybe a pumpkin patch. That sort of thing.

The soil, the stealing, the watering......not going to be a problem as we intend to do indoor aquaculture similar to this Basement Aquaponics and Raising Tilapia » FreestyleFarm
No need for subsidies, this is inexpensive and easily sustainable by two people.

Indoor growing used to take a lot of electricity, but with the advent of LED grow technology, that's no longer the case.

Regardless, I intend to grow in complete compliance of the law as outlined here;
http://www.legislature.mi.gov/(S(0th...-1-of-2008.pdf
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Old 02-28-2017, 01:41 PM
 
1,090 posts, read 1,286,799 times
Reputation: 1183
Quote:
Originally Posted by Indentured Servant View Post
Believe me....people can tell. You do not have to flaunt wealth....but little things that you do or do not do will make you stand out. I mean.....the optics of a middle age white couple moving into the community.....I mean....what percentage of middle age white couples are poor? It might just be assumed that you have more than the people around there.

I hope you do move to Detroit.....but like I said....you have to be very careful. Don't think you are going to fool anyone about your economic status. People are aware of gentrification....and its not usually poor people who gentrify.
Not to mention people in these areas might be resentful of gentrification. OP could become a target. But with their income there's no need for them to move to a poorer neighborhood. They could live comfortably and safely and still save money.
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Old 02-28-2017, 01:54 PM
 
Location: Metro Detroit
17 posts, read 19,006 times
Reputation: 47
I would recommend my childhood stomping grounds; Southwest Detroit: zipcodes 48208, 48209 and 48216. The area is predominantly Hispanic today. But it used to be Irish/Polish until about the 70-80's. Many older white families still live in the area. I don't think OP would have an issue blending in with the neighborhood.

Last edited by nv529; 02-28-2017 at 02:07 PM..
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Old 02-28-2017, 01:55 PM
 
12,486 posts, read 7,585,778 times
Reputation: 4755
Quote:
Originally Posted by VM1138 View Post
Not to mention people in these areas might be resentful of gentrification. OP could become a target. But with their income there's no need for them to move to a poorer neighborhood. They could live comfortably and safely and still save money.
Exactly! The climate of the country is also changing. It seems like intolerance is on the rise.....and you don't want to be where some fool is going seek some "get back" on the innocent. I can also foresee resentment as blacks in the city still suffer in poverty while Downtown and surroundings looks increasingly white an prosperous. I mean.....even though people try not to talk about it......the optics of race is still huge in the area, being one of the most segregated metro areas in the country. I mean, Detroit is not Jacksonville.
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Old 02-28-2017, 03:08 PM
 
Location: Southeast Michigan
1,277 posts, read 1,071,638 times
Reputation: 1544
Wait, wait...you want to raise tilapia in your house, too?! Might take a wee bit of extra investment there, don't you think?
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