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Old 03-22-2017, 05:31 PM
 
Location: Chicago
937 posts, read 842,656 times
Reputation: 1102

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It is simply not true that the biggest difference between Detroit and Chicago is the lack of public transportation. I am all for changing perceptions about the city, but we need to give the correct impression to potential new residents. Palmer Park is lovely area, but if you go about a mile down McNichols you can inadvertently end up in a neighborhood in bombed out neighborhood in Highland Park. The OP should not be afraid of Detroit, but she should also know that it is very definitively NOT Chicago sans public transportation. Don't be scared if you move here, but do invest in a security system and do be sure that you are aware of your surroundings.

It is important that people visit and spend a lot of time here before making the choice to live in the city. It is important that they understand both the good and the bad. They need not be afraid of Detroit, but they should understand it. It's a city with a high abandonment rate, it is a city with a high crime rate, it is a city with a lot of food deserts. And unlike cities like Chicago, the spots where those aspects are the worst are not shunted off to one side, away from all of the good parts.

Last edited by brodie734; 03-22-2017 at 05:41 PM..
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Old 03-22-2017, 10:16 PM
 
124 posts, read 108,160 times
Reputation: 163
lol

I meant as in only a difference that would be noticeable to OP, obviously OP isn't going to be venturing out into brightmoor, get a grip.
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Old 03-22-2017, 11:56 PM
 
Location: Detroit
3,671 posts, read 4,800,902 times
Reputation: 2624
I would suggest your visit some of the areas a few times before moving into them. One thing I will say about Detroit is it is a city of pockets, what I mean by that is it isn't like "this side of town is bad but the other side of town is good". You could quickly go from a decent neighborhood to a bad neighborhood real quick and sometimes it's shocking. Or you could be in a neighborhood that is mostly a intact working class neighborhood but have 2 or 3 blocks that look terrible/ bombed out/ deserted, pass those blocks and it looks like a regular neighborhood again. It's kind of crazy but it's something you may or may not get used to.

If you really want to buy a house in the city then you can most certainly find a good house at a great price with great neighbors, ect.

At your price range I would suggest Palmer Woods, Rosedale Park, North Rosedale park, University District, Sherwood Forest, Green Acres, Indian Village, maybe Boston- Edison. The biggest problem with Boston- Edison is it's pretty small and almost completely surrounded by some pretty bad areas while the other areas I mentioned border mostly working class neighborhoods or like Indian Village which has it's proximity to alot of amenities.

Btw, most of Detroit is not a food desert, there's an entire article with a map online debunking that myth and that was back in 2011 I think. It showed that only 10% of the city's land area is a "food dessert" meaning there is not a full service grocery store within 1 mile of them. And most of that 10% is actually parks, industrial land, or deserted ghettos.

But if I were you I would visit these areas first and see what I like the most.
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Old 03-23-2017, 07:21 AM
 
2 posts, read 1,807 times
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Since your plans are to send your kids to a Catholic schools you should consider moving into areas on Novi, Northville and/or South Lyon because Novi is a home to one of the prestigious Catholic boys schools called Detroit Catholic Central. They are pretty much top notch in everything. You can look them up for their awesome programs. The school has just built a brand new school for girls, St Siena, which is in the adjacent side of their property that borders Novi, South Lyon and Wixom. Meanwhile, your $800,000 home price tag could get you a brand new built 4,000 or so square foot home with a huge basement in these areas that will make it convenient for the schooling and all the major shopping including the 12 Oaks Mall which is in Novi. From experience I know that South Lyon has slightly smaller property taxes where as Novi and Northville in particular are rather tax-heavy. Also, highway 96 is close to these Citi ties and that makes the compute into downtown easy. As for crime rate, these areas are peaceful and it is rather impossible to compare Detroit's sky-high crime rate to these cities in Oakland County.
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Old 03-23-2017, 08:06 AM
 
Location: Chicago
937 posts, read 842,656 times
Reputation: 1102
Quote:
Originally Posted by newengland17 View Post
lol

I meant as in only a difference that would be noticeable to OP, obviously OP isn't going to be venturing out into brightmoor, get a grip.
I would sincerely question how much time you have spent in Detroit neighborhoods if you don't understand how easy it is for somebody unfamiliar with the area to accidentally drive from Palmer Park into a neighborhood that looks post-apocalyptic. I might also question how much time you have spent in areas of Chicago where people have $800,000 houses if you don't realize that how different those places are to the nice parts of Detroit. It is one thing to avoid Brightmoor when you know what Brightmoor is and know how to get around it, and is quite another thing when you are coming here for the very first time sight unseen.

I keep saying the OP needs to come here for that reason... anyone can pay lip service to understanding the ways in which Detroit is different than other cities. But the only thing that can really make you comfortable here is seeing the reality on the ground. Detroit does not have a lot of neighborhood Catholic schools anymore, it does not have the same urban environment as a lot of other cities, ones that have a good side of town and a bad side of town as opposed to a bunch of pockets sitting next to each other or little commercial districts, of which Detroit has only a few that aren't semi-vacant.

These are reasons not to move to Detroit, they are just things to consider before investing nearly a million dollars here as opposed to somewhere you might be more comfortable. People should definitely avoid the advice of anyone telling them to move Northville or South Lyon.
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Old 03-23-2017, 09:44 AM
 
Location: Southeast Michigan
1,277 posts, read 1,071,638 times
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What's good is that they explore the area thoroughly and compare commutes, schools, neighborhoods and amenities, and determine what appeals to them the most. Again, congrats OP; Michigan welcomes you!
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Old 03-23-2017, 10:52 AM
 
Location: Chicago
937 posts, read 842,656 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brodie734 View Post
These are reasons not to move to Detroit
This should have said "AREN'T" not are.
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Old 03-23-2017, 11:34 AM
 
Location: Metro Detroit
1,786 posts, read 1,930,463 times
Reputation: 3554
Quote:
Originally Posted by Susantown View Post
Since your plans are to send your kids to a Catholic schools you should consider moving into areas on Novi, Northville and/or South Lyon because Novi is a home to one of the prestigious Catholic boys schools called Detroit Catholic Central. They are pretty much top notch in everything. You can look them up for their awesome programs. The school has just built a brand new school for girls, St Siena, which is in the adjacent side of their property that borders Novi, South Lyon and Wixom. Meanwhile, your $800,000 home price tag could get you a brand new built 4,000 or so square foot home with a huge basement in these areas that will make it convenient for the schooling and all the major shopping including the 12 Oaks Mall which is in Novi. From experience I know that South Lyon has slightly smaller property taxes where as Novi and Northville in particular are rather tax-heavy. Also, highway 96 is close to these Citi ties and that makes the compute into downtown easy. As for crime rate, these areas are peaceful and it is rather impossible to compare Detroit's sky-high crime rate to these cities in Oakland County.
South Lyon, Novi, and Northville are your quintessential outer-ring suburbia. Northville has a quaint downtown that you could convince me is a nice place to be, but otherwise unless OP wants to be in your stereotypical soulless suburban sprawl, which based on OPs posts is not preferable, I wouldn't advise they don't bother with the far western edge of the metro. Also, depending on where OP works, South Lyon can be an awful commute. Don't get me wrong, those are great towns if you're looking for new-build, big-money suburbia; however when someone makes the statement of "...living in the suburbs will be hard for me" - you don't suggest 3 of the most suburbany suburbs in the entire metro.
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Old 03-23-2017, 07:13 PM
 
2,952 posts, read 4,346,099 times
Reputation: 2238
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geo-Aggie View Post
South Lyon, Novi, and Northville are your quintessential outer-ring suburbia. Northville has a quaint downtown that you could convince me is a nice place to be, but otherwise unless OP wants to be in your stereotypical soulless suburban sprawl, which based on OPs posts is not preferable, I wouldn't advise they don't bother with the far western edge of the metro. Also, depending on where OP works, South Lyon can be an awful commute. Don't get me wrong, those are great towns if you're looking for new-build, big-money suburbia; however when someone makes the statement of "...living in the suburbs will be hard for me" - you don't suggest 3 of the most suburbany suburbs in the entire metro.
That is only a relevant comment relative to what else is on offer.

IMO the only suburbs with real urban flair are Royal Oak and Ferndale, and that is even kind of a stretch. There's nothing more cosmopolitan about living in 95% of the inner ring suburbs than Milford, or Paw Paw for that matter. It's what you call a discrepancy without a difference.

Anyway, to the OP, IMO MS13's comment is by far the best and most accurate on here.

BE is true pioneer territory.

IV less so but likely still too adventerous for many.

In terms of real viable neighborhoods where you could move into Detroit and really have a nice neighborhood with quasi-suburban (or other big city) expectations of stability and safety you are looking at the cluster of neighborhoods in the far north Woodward corridor (Palmer Park, Green Acres, Palmer Woods etc.) and maybe Rosedale Park.

There might be more but those are the big ticket ones IMO. (Besides downtown/midtown.)

Again, I don't know everything, but as far as I know, those are pretty much your options.

As others have pointed out, one of the challenging things about Detroit is that no matter where you live, you are rarely if ever too far removed from what, to many, are very concerning environments.
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Old 03-23-2017, 10:16 PM
 
1,851 posts, read 2,292,617 times
Reputation: 1864
Quote:
Originally Posted by missscarlett27 View Post
Thank you again to everyone who has responded. While I am definitely going to consider the suburbs, we are still leaning towards living with the Detroit city lines. I do need to realize that Detroit city living is going to be very different from the city living we are used to. Hoping we can find a neighborhood that we love and feel safe in. The idea of being able to purchase our dream home in some Detroit neighborhoods at a price we can afford is definitely tempting. The school situation does concern me. We are used to going to our neighborhood Catholic School.
The University District has a K-8 school on the south end of the neighborhood. It is called Gesu Catholic School. Also, the University of Detroit Jesuit High School is just a 1/2 mile west of the University District in the Bagley neighborhood.

There are even 2 Catholic universities in the neighborhood - University of Detroit-Mercy and Marygrove College.

The Palmer Woods/Sherwood Forest/University District/Green Acres might be the way to go.

Another area to consider is the Grandmont-Rosedale neighborhood, specifically North Rosedale Park. One of the best areas in Detroit, and there is a small K-8 Catholic school on the edge of North Rosedale Park called Christ the King.

Grandmont Rosedale Development Corporation

North Rosedale Park Civic Association

Christ the King Catholic School – Educating Students in Detroit Since 1938
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