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Old 05-31-2017, 05:56 PM
 
Location: In the heights
24,543 posts, read 25,348,512 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Retroit View Post
Another thing they should do is set aside areas for commercial districts. Most other cities have large areas (several square miles) of warehouses, distribution centers, minor manufacturing, etc. With all the recently vacated land, Detroit could easily replicate them with some planning.

...and bring in a heck of a lot more revenue than parks.
Sure, but if I'm not mistaken, Detroit actually currently has a massive amount of commercial and industrial-zoned land that is extremely under-utilized. Is the issue not having a large enough contiguous plots?
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Old 05-31-2017, 06:35 PM
 
Location: Here.
14,554 posts, read 13,274,329 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post
Sure, but if I'm not mistaken, Detroit actually currently has a massive amount of commercial and industrial-zoned land that is extremely under-utilized. Is the issue not having a large enough contiguous plots?
I've noticed that other cities have these large contiguous areas of large warehouse tyoe structures. I'm assuming there is some benefit in having them all in one area as opposed to spread out like Detroit used to have. Possibly less disruptive to neighborhoods, less noise, truck traffic. Also these areas are probably 9-5, so they become dead zones 5-9. And ancillary businesses are more likely to do business if there are more of these warehouse type businesses in one area, for example forklift servicing companies.
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Old 05-31-2017, 07:07 PM
 
Location: Michigan
4,571 posts, read 7,264,188 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post
Sure, but if I'm not mistaken, Detroit actually currently has a massive amount of commercial and industrial-zoned land that is extremely under-utilized. Is the issue not having a large enough contiguous plots?
Partly yes, partly that many of those areas still have vacant industrial structures from the previous century. Like the Packard Plant but much smaller. Too small for most modern industrial standards but also pretty expensive to tear down when you include the brownfield remediation (at least without subsidies).

With the first issue, residential areas have to be removed and infrastructure has reconfigured in order to serve any expanded industrial areas. A lot of industrial areas abut populated residential areas with almost no buffer. It might end up where many residential streets would have increased truck traffic on them which at the very least would keep land values in those area suppressed or might even precipitate the exodus of residents from those areas.

If you actually compared Detroit's industrial areas to a lot of Detroit's suburban areas, the percentage of land use dedicated to industrial use is a little bit smaller in most cases. Detroit has 8% (just over 7,000 acres) of it's land area zoned for industrial. Dearborn is 18%, Warren is 16%, and Livonia is 11% (totaling just about the same number of acres as in the city). Then there's suburbs out in the fringes with ready to develop land for industrial sites. All with buffers and streets separated from residential areas and no messy brownfields to clean up.

There's various areas of Detroit where different methods have been used to expand industrial areas at the expense of residential areas; the southern half of Corktown, Poletown (GM Hamtramck-Detroit assembly), etc. None were too popular with local residents especially the ones that had to be evicted.

It's not impossible, but like with any old city, adjusting to the 21st century is not without its challenges.
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Old 06-02-2017, 03:12 AM
 
1,851 posts, read 2,293,137 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post
As more people move in downtown and surrounding regions and large parcels in the city have had their buildings leveled, is the city planning to create any new large parks? If so, where are the plans? Is there a site or thread agglomerating new parks and greenspace for the city?
About 4 to 6 years ago, there was an effort spearheaded by University of Detroit-Mercy, developer Baron-Salazar-McCormick to develop a 3,500-acre greenway centered around DAYLIGHTING the Bloody Run Creek. Features of the Plan include:

1. Daylighting a 3 mile section of the buried Bloody Run Creek from the Detroit River to Hamtramck and the Packard Plant on the near east side

2. This creek would be the focal point of a 3,500 acre linear park that would include ponds, bike paths running along the creek, small forests, urban farming and renewable energy development

3. Daylighting the creek would reduce the stress on the Detroit Water & Sewerage System by 3 billions gallons of stormwater a year. Native plantings, along with a few retention ponds, would naturally filter the stormwater flowing through the creek

4. Other Features of the plan include a large pond just east of Eastern Market, a waterfall down into the Dequindre Cut, and a canal running through the Dequindre Cut down to the Detroit River

5. The Plan would cost 1 billion over 4 phases, and 25 years, and would generate 16,000 permanent jobs and 3 billion in private development. A link to the plan is below

https://issuu.com/dcdc-udm/docs/bloodyrun

MASTER PLAN









There is already plenty of land for industrial. This is the kind of development that would groundbreaking, would attract residents and in general make the city more attractive to live in. This is a pipe dream because of the cost.

Last edited by usroute10; 06-02-2017 at 03:44 AM..
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Old 06-02-2017, 06:39 AM
 
Location: Here.
14,554 posts, read 13,274,329 times
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That's interesting. I've seen the remaining section of Bloody Run Creek in Elmwood Cemetery, but never knew it extended to Hamtramck. I'm guessing it was much bigger than it is currently. Which makes me wonder where would they get the waterflow to sustain it? You couldn't just have stagnant water. Would they open up the storm drains and let the water flow into the creek?

P.S. Never mind. I read the brochure. They would use the storm water. It looks like the Bloody Run extended up past 8 Mile Road. And Conner Creek was called Trembles?

Last edited by Retroit; 06-02-2017 at 06:49 AM..
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Old 06-02-2017, 07:03 AM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
27,765 posts, read 65,577,769 times
Reputation: 32923
Quote:
Originally Posted by usroute10 View Post
About 4 to 6 years ago, there was an effort spearheaded by University of Detroit-Mercy, developer Baron-Salazar-McCormick to develop a 3,500-acre greenway centered around DAYLIGHTING the Bloody Run Creek. Features of the Plan include:

1. Daylighting a 3 mile section of the buried Bloody Run Creek from the Detroit River to Hamtramck and the Packard Plant on the near east side

2. This creek would be the focal point of a 3,500 acre linear park that would include ponds, bike paths running along the creek, small forests, urban farming and renewable energy development

3. Daylighting the creek would reduce the stress on the Detroit Water & Sewerage System by 3 billions gallons of stormwater a year. Native plantings, along with a few retention ponds, would naturally filter the stormwater flowing through the creek

4. Other Features of the plan include a large pond just east of Eastern Market, a waterfall down into the Dequindre Cut, and a canal running through the Dequindre Cut down to the Detroit River

5. The Plan would cost 1 billion over 4 phases, and 25 years, and would generate 16,000 permanent jobs and 3 billion in private development. A link to the plan is below

https://issuu.com/dcdc-udm/docs/bloodyrun

MASTER PLAN









There is already plenty of land for industrial. This is the kind of development that would groundbreaking, would attract residents and in general make the city more attractive to live in. This is a pipe dream because of the cost.
This is a neat idea, but probably unrealistic. These plans always underestimate costs and overestimate the benefits (typically by a factor of 10). By exaggerating things, they destroy their entire credibility. No one is going to look at a park and believe it will add 16,000 permanent jobs other than in someone's imagination. Nor can the $1 billion be adjusted for time. If it is done over 25 years, I will cost many times the already underestimated estimate. In all likelihood he based it in part on suppressed land values of the time. Now just acquisition alone would cost more than $1 billion.

Still the idea of day-lighting the creeks that were put into our storm drain system is a good idea. You would need huge settling basins to prevent overflow during storms and you would need people to prevent/clean up dumping and pollution of the water (maybe that is where the 16000 jobs come from).

Where does the water come from? If this is water draining off of city streets, it would require a huge amount of natural filtration to clean it up and the creek and settling basins would be filthy and smelly. Many of the creeks that were put into the drain system were natural drainage for water accumulating in the area. Now the places where the water accumulated are covered with pavement and buildings. THere is a lot more water draining because very little settles and it is all picking up oil, dirt and chemicals from the roads, roofs and soil.

Dreams are nice, but often the reality presents more difficulties than ever imagined by the dreamer (who usually just ignores the problems of reality).

I would love to see something like this implemented. I would be amazed if it is implement in my lifetime,but it is good to keep the idea alive, maybe my grandchildren or greet grandchildren will see it. On the other hand, you never know. who would have thought Detroit would look like it does today? If someone claimed it woudl come this far this fast, I would have said they were dreaming.
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Old 06-06-2017, 09:51 AM
 
Location: In the heights
24,543 posts, read 25,348,512 times
Reputation: 13087
Quote:
Originally Posted by usroute10 View Post
About 4 to 6 years ago, there was an effort spearheaded by University of Detroit-Mercy, developer Baron-Salazar-McCormick to develop a 3,500-acre greenway centered around DAYLIGHTING the Bloody Run Creek. Features of the Plan include:

1. Daylighting a 3 mile section of the buried Bloody Run Creek from the Detroit River to Hamtramck and the Packard Plant on the near east side

2. This creek would be the focal point of a 3,500 acre linear park that would include ponds, bike paths running along the creek, small forests, urban farming and renewable energy development

3. Daylighting the creek would reduce the stress on the Detroit Water & Sewerage System by 3 billions gallons of stormwater a year. Native plantings, along with a few retention ponds, would naturally filter the stormwater flowing through the creek

4. Other Features of the plan include a large pond just east of Eastern Market, a waterfall down into the Dequindre Cut, and a canal running through the Dequindre Cut down to the Detroit River

5. The Plan would cost 1 billion over 4 phases, and 25 years, and would generate 16,000 permanent jobs and 3 billion in private development. A link to the plan is below

https://issuu.com/dcdc-udm/docs/bloodyrun

MASTER PLAN









There is already plenty of land for industrial. This is the kind of development that would groundbreaking, would attract residents and in general make the city more attractive to live in. This is a pipe dream because of the cost.
This is an incredibly grand plan. The phased development might work. I think the inclusion of not just parkland, but also sewage treatment for a tributary of the Great Lakes system as well as the transit usage of the bike path would normally qualify a plan like this for multiple state and federal agencies to fund portions of this. Has any politician or major private developer put this on their agenda?
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