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Old 08-05-2017, 10:05 AM
 
514 posts, read 612,754 times
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Are you Jewish? You don't want to be Jewish in Grosse Pointe. You will face severe discrimination.
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Old 08-15-2017, 09:26 AM
 
76 posts, read 43,172 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by e130478 View Post
Are you Jewish? You don't want to be Jewish in Grosse Pointe. You will face severe discrimination.
Disclaimer: I graduated from Grosse Pointe South decades ago.

No you won't. While Grosse Pointe is clique-ish (most people befriended people from their Church, at least when I lived there) there was no discrimination against Jews. Now against Black people was a different story.

I feel a lot of things have changed since I grew up there. Some for the better (it's more diverse and inclusive) and other aspects for the worse (I hear it's poorer and the public school system is deteriorating).

But if you want to know the atmosphere it's very "Mayberry" things close early, your neighbors are polite but generally keep to themselves, boating was big (Join the Yacht club! Enroll your kids into sailing classes. Compete in a Regatta). Most crime is caused by bored teenagers.

I have moved from Michigan (live in Miami Beach) but I still have a house in GP I inherited. Since I grew up there I keep it as a sort of "shrine" lol and will be back this September to check on it.

If Detroit ever makes a comeback GP will be the place to be.
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Old 08-16-2017, 06:57 AM
 
1,851 posts, read 2,293,709 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ScubaSteve87 View Post
Disclaimer: I graduated from Grosse Pointe South decades ago.

No you won't. While Grosse Pointe is clique-ish (most people befriended people from their Church, at least when I lived there) there was no discrimination against Jews. Now against Black people was a different story.

I feel a lot of things have changed since I grew up there. Some for the better (it's more diverse and inclusive) and other aspects for the worse (I hear it's poorer and the public school system is deteriorating).

But if you want to know the atmosphere it's very "Mayberry" things close early, your neighbors are polite but generally keep to themselves, boating was big (Join the Yacht club! Enroll your kids into sailing classes. Compete in a Regatta). Most crime is caused by bored teenagers.

I have moved from Michigan (live in Miami Beach) but I still have a house in GP I inherited. Since I grew up there I keep it as a sort of "shrine" lol and will be back this September to check on it.

If Detroit ever makes a comeback GP will be the place to be.
HYPERBOLE anyone. The schools are deteriorating?

According to the below ranking, Grosse Pointe High School and Grosse Pointe North High School rank 13th and 28th in the state.

These are Michigan's top 50 high schools, U.S. News says | MLive.com

The Cabbage Patch area of Grosse Pointe Park has become a hotspot for young professionals who work downtown.

The Grosse Pointes might not be the ultra-exclusive area it was once - places like Birmingham and Bloomfield and Northville have supplanted them - but they are still going strong. They even have a trolley that travels to the 3 business districts.
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Old 08-16-2017, 09:42 AM
 
76 posts, read 43,172 times
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Originally Posted by usroute10 View Post
HYPERBOLE anyone. The schools are deteriorating?

According to the below ranking, Grosse Pointe High School and Grosse Pointe North High School rank 13th and 28th in the state.

These are Michigan's top 50 high schools, U.S. News says | MLive.com

The Cabbage Patch area of Grosse Pointe Park has become a hotspot for young professionals who work downtown.

The Grosse Pointes might not be the ultra-exclusive area it was once - places like Birmingham and Bloomfield and Northville have supplanted them - but they are still going strong. They even have a trolley that travels to the 3 business districts.
That's what I hear. I no longer have experience with the public school system so I rely on what people tell me. Notice I said "deteriorated" not that they weren't still good. When I lived in GP it was one of the premier suburbs in the USA. Now it's not even the best in Michigan. It's still good though.

I do know this, I inherited two homes in Michigan from my parents. One is in GP and the other in Ann Arbor. And the home in GP has barely increased in value (not that I care, I'm not going to sell it if it increases 10x) compared to the home in Ann Arbor. In fact, I just sold that one to the people renting it... They offered me a deal above market value.
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Old 08-16-2017, 09:43 AM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
27,759 posts, read 65,587,794 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by usroute10 View Post
HYPERBOLE anyone. The schools are deteriorating?

According to the below ranking, Grosse Pointe High School and Grosse Pointe North High School rank 13th and 28th in the state.

These are Michigan's top 50 high schools, U.S. News says | MLive.com

The Cabbage Patch area of Grosse Pointe Park has become a hotspot for young professionals who work downtown.

The Grosse Pointes might not be the ultra-exclusive area it was once - places like Birmingham and Bloomfield and Northville have supplanted them - but they are still going strong. They even have a trolley that travels to the 3 business districts.
Don't know whether the schools are or are not "decaying" but those selective statistics rankings tell you nothing more than how the selective statistics compare to selective statistics from another school. I would take the word of some involved parents (it would have to be more than one family) with actual experience in the schools to make that call.
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Old 08-18-2017, 06:38 PM
 
10,164 posts, read 7,825,271 times
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GP schools are deteriorating overall, but it depends where.

GP South is holding strong, GP North is definitely deteriorating.

The Pointes are beautiful and still very desirable, but very clearly have declined. Fifty years ago they were the wealthiest places in Michigan, now they're dirt cheap compared to Birmingham-Bloomfield and even cheaper per square foot than places like Northville, Rochester, Huntington Woods.

Look what 300k, 500k, 1 million, gets you in Birmingham then compare what you get in the Pointes. It's almost absurd.
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Old 08-19-2017, 10:53 AM
 
Location: Ann Arbor MI
2,105 posts, read 1,348,976 times
Reputation: 2895
Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
Look what 300k, 500k, 1 million, gets you in Birmingham then compare what you get in the Pointes. It's almost absurd.
I wouldn't say absurd I would say supply and demand in a free market.
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Old 08-19-2017, 04:39 PM
 
60,448 posts, read 85,521,430 times
Reputation: 13267
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Originally Posted by dr_j_planning View Post
Grosse Pointe was and still is Metropolitan Detroit's "old money" suburb. While many perceive GP as being less exclusive and affluent than it used to be, such perception is more a product of other suburban areas rising in affluence rather than a decline of Grosse Pointe. For example, when my mother's family moved there in 1955, there really weren't many affluent suburban residential communities in Metropolitan Detroit. Suburbs like Novi, Rochester Hills and Troy did not exist. Bloomfield and Birmingham existed, but they were newer and far less established than Grosse Pointe. Brand new construction was unheard of in the farm country of Oakland and Commerce Townships; Northville and Plymouth were small towns in the sticks. GP was THE suburb in the 1950s and exclusively WASP; no diversity. This was also a time when the city of Detroit was overwhelmingly the center for jobs, retail, and entertainment, so Grosse Pointe was close to the action. Northland Mall had just opened and the GM Tech Center in Warren was under construction. Metro Detroit was on the precipice of great suburban expansion and white flight from the city but those dynamics were in nascent stages. Grosse Pointe had many fabulous, expansive estates with large numbers of staff and famous residents, along with a suite of exclusive and private clubs; these characteristics fueled outsider perceptions but the reality is that more than half the homes in Grosse Pointe were tidy, well-built residences you could find in a number of places, including Beverly Hills, Pleasant Ridge, Huntington Woods, East English Village, Birmingham, Sherwood Forest or the University District.

Fast forward to 2017. Grosse Pointe, like many older suburbs, has declined significantly in population due to a sizeable drop in household size (1955 was near the height of the Baby Boom, where 3-4 kids per household was the norm). The large estates have been demolished, subdivided and rebuilt with high-end tract housing. Nobody keeps large numbers of staff anymore. The population has some diversity, but lack of affordable housing options in GP has really prevented true diversification. Grosse Pointers have watched Detroit's degradation with dismay and quietly vowed such disinvestment will never unravel their community; they have taken a stand. As a result, the city of Detroit has largely eroded around the community of Grosse Pointe, which creates a stark contrast of beautifully maintained executive homes on tree-lined streets separated from blocks peppered with vacant lots, dilapidated housing and pocked shells of former retail blocks by a single road.

While Detroit has declined, GP residents and leaders have invested strongly in homes, parks, business districts, schools and public safety to maintain their desirability. There was no riot in GP in 1967; one phone call from the Ford household to President Johnson ensured tanks rolled down Jefferson Avenue to stand guard at the border. GP leaders have also made some strategic decisions that limit access to non-residents, which effectively exclude many of lower socio-economic status: clubs are private and parks and schools are resident-only. Grosse Pointe education foundations, community foundations and housing foundations have all channeled the generous financial support of local families above and beyond property taxes and state subsidies to lift the community above others to improve aspects of the Grosse Pointe lifestyle. Such practices keep affluent families in and, in many cases, less affluent families out.

Some examples: (1) Parks - the parks are the most beautiful municipal recreation facilities you will ever see, but you'll only see them if you present a valid Park Pass and you'll only obtain a valid Park Pass if you can properly verify your residency status in the community. Enforcement is strict; a staffed gatehouse guards the entrance to each community's lakefront park. (2) Schools - strict residency requirements also apply to the Grosse Pointe Public Schools and private investigators still comb the rolls and visit properties to ferret out any students whose guardians do not demonstrate legitimate residency. Grosse Pointe remains closed to Schools of Choice, so you must live in the Grosse Pointe District to attend its schools. (3) Housing - many of the rental properties in Grosse Pointe Park were incorporated into the Grosse Pointe Housing Foundation program when they began to deteriorate and experience increased vacancy. Generous support from a few prominent families, particularly the Cotton Family (Meridian Health) supported rehabilitation and subsidized rents to reinvigorate those properties, but those rental subsidies were only awarded to certain individuals in various advanced stages of professional education who met strict academic requirements. The Cotton Family also purchased and demolished or re-purposed a number of businesses in the commercial district along Kercheval Avenue. Demand for housing in Grosse Pointe Park simultaneously rebounded with the resurgence of downtown Detroit. The result is a much more vibrant community with much-improved housing and retail, but far fewer lower income and racially diverse households. As a result, black student enrollment has experienced a marked decline at schools that serve Grosse Pointe Park (e.g. Defer, Trombly, Maire, Pierce, South) in the past few years.

In summary, Grosse Pointe is old school and they like it that way; this is the bastion of preppydom. Families, schools, church, kids, dogs and boats dominate the culture. Education and tradition are extremely important; change not so much. How long your family has lived there is more important than your bank account (which is not a polite topic of conversation, by the way). GP fancies itself Martha's Vineyard or Nantucket. The community treasures its history, its architecture and its prominence along the waterfront. There are no malls here, but several quaint shopping districts primarily along Mack and Kercheval Avenues. It is understated, low-key and timeless.

If all of this sounds like a dream come true, by all means move there; no other place like it in Michigan. However, if not, there are plenty of other upscale, newer suburbs in a crescent that largely extends northeast from Plymouth to Shelby.

Good luck!
Or if it is about getting into Grosse Pointe Schools, get in via the portion of Harper Woods that is within the Grosse Pointe SD. An example of this: Census Tract 551300 in Wayne County, Michigan (Keep in mind that the median household income for the census tract is still at the Detroit metro and above the state figures for the time period, 2010-2014 census info)

Another one: Census Tract 551400 in Wayne County, Michigan (the median household income is a little below the state and metro figures)

Detroit, Warren, Livonia Metro Area - USA.com™
Michigan State - USA.com™
Grosse Pointe Public Schools - USA.com™

So, that portion is still in the range of middle class, but in comparison to other parts of GP, it may be viewed differently.
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