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Old 01-26-2011, 11:25 PM
 
Location: Detroit's eastside, downtown Detroit in near future!
2,055 posts, read 3,890,469 times
Reputation: 661

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Quote:
Originally Posted by newport1885 View Post
Its unfortunate that a lot of blacks still feel excluded from mainstream metro detroit. I never see a lot of residents go to the red wings, tigers game. Or working at higher positions downtown. Detroit will never prosper without the "REAL DETROIT" circulating big money in their city.
you do realize there are blacks with higher positions in the city and in the metro?
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Old 08-02-2015, 12:37 PM
 
4,719 posts, read 8,564,012 times
Reputation: 1841
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tricia819 View Post
LOL...yeah cause the pay is so great. Sorry, as a teacher DPS is the LAST place I would apply for job.
Why not apply to Highland Park, Michigan schools?

Quote:
Originally Posted by us66 View Post
Abraham Lincoln did not graduate from Troy High and look at how well he did with his studies. If I remember his biography correctly, his family couldn't even afford paper. I think the real problem is what parents expect from a school and from their children. Parents who can barely be bothered to send their children to school, parents who can't bother to send them with a breakfast or a lunch (even when they get the food for free through food stamps), parents who use the school as a free babysitter, parents who aren't hopping mad that their children graduate nearly functionally illiterate. These are real problems. We could spend a billion dollars and build nice schools in the inner city and double teacher pay and I don't think we would get much of an appreciable result.
It is true that education is more about hard work and less about funding or facilities.
At the same time it would be interesting to compare a high school in Abe Lincoln's time to one today. Back then far fewer people even went, or needed to go to, high school. Nowadays it's compulsory and people have no hope of a good job without it.
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Old 08-07-2015, 09:59 AM
 
536 posts, read 494,395 times
Reputation: 1398
Detroit should have never build such an extensive freeway system that allows one to flow from the suburbs to downtown so easily. With the race riots, closure of plants and freeway system, whites were able to empty out from the inner city the minute things got rough. This isn't to say blacks were unable too as well, but at the time many/most did not have the financial means to do so. I always wonder what would have happened to Detroit had not so many people fled. Now a days, the city is so burnt out and dilapidated in so many places that i don't think it will ever come close to regaining what it lost. This is not to say a turn around is impossible, but i don't believe the turn around will be on the scale that many Detroit area residents want to believe.
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Old 08-07-2015, 01:28 PM
 
Location: Detroit
3,671 posts, read 4,800,902 times
Reputation: 2624
The fact is, I don't think nobody is expecting Detroit to return to what it was back in the 50's. It was a different city in a different time. When the city does come back, it is going to be different from when it ever was, even back then. Take NYC for example, it's revival didn't bring back the old days, it made it kind of a different type of city all together. Detroit is going to be a different city in the future, hopefully it's culture will still be preserved. It more than likely will have to co-exist with the new comers bringing in a new culture, vibe, ect.
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Old 08-07-2015, 01:56 PM
 
Location: Nescopeck, Penna. (birthplace)
13,041 posts, read 8,049,915 times
Reputation: 16991
Let me begin by saying that I've never actually lived in or near Detroit; but working with Detroiters in my first job after college, and exposure to its local media (notice my favorite baseball team) has probably given me more exposure to the city than most "outsiders".

The thread linked below, I believe, gives a very important clue as to the root cause of the city's instability:

//www.city-data.com/forum/detro...ying-book.html

As explained in Mr. Conot's work, the automobile industry, and more importantly, the nature of constant changes in the previous industries (furniture, stoves and carriages) which gave rise to it, didn't lend themselves well to the daily lives of the people who served in it, then found themselves on the outside, and moved on.

That feature is not unique to Detroit; the community of Berwick, Penna, (pop 25,000) where I grew up and got my basic education, has seen its predominant industry change three times during the 65 years I've been around. But a couple of characteristics unique to the auto industry probably accelerate the trend and emphasize the vulnerability, and the changes underwrite the short-term thinking common to both the political manipulators and their clientele.
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Old 08-09-2015, 06:23 PM
 
Location: Overland Park, Kansas
743 posts, read 977,754 times
Reputation: 717
Quote:
Originally Posted by 02blackgt View Post
Detroit should have never build such an extensive freeway system that allows one to flow from the suburbs to downtown so easily. With the race riots, closure of plants and freeway system, whites were able to empty out from the inner city the minute things got rough. This isn't to say blacks were unable too as well, but at the time many/most did not have the financial means to do so. I always wonder what would have happened to Detroit had not so many people fled. Now a days, the city is so burnt out and dilapidated in so many places that i don't think it will ever come close to regaining what it lost. This is not to say a turn around is impossible, but i don't believe the turn around will be on the scale that many Detroit area residents want to believe.
If the decline hadn't happened there would be a Macy's flagship downtown and the Hudson's building would still be standing as a result. Macy's kept a presence in downtown St Louis and Pittsburgh for a surprisingly long amount of time.
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Old 08-12-2015, 10:06 PM
 
Location: Chicago
937 posts, read 842,656 times
Reputation: 1102
it's hard to play alternate history with Detroit because you need at least three things to go differently to get a substantially different outcome:

1. different racial politics and attitudes that don't place an exceedingly high value on segregation
2. related to the above, a toxic relationship between the city and the suburbs leading to a still widespread attitude of "let it rot" from those north of 8 Mile and west of Telegraph.
3. stability in the auto/manufacturing industries keeping people in middle class jobs without needing an education

If #3 happened, we'd be living in a VERY different world... if #1 and #2 happened, the city would have still declined it just wouldn't have become the worldwide metronym for urban decay. So it would be like Cleveland or Pittsburgh or St. Louis or any other city in the Rust Belt, only probably larger.
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Old 08-13-2015, 02:51 PM
 
1,851 posts, read 2,292,617 times
Reputation: 1864
Quote:
Originally Posted by brodie734 View Post
it's hard to play alternate history with Detroit because you need at least three things to go differently to get a substantially different outcome:

1. different racial politics and attitudes that don't place an exceedingly high value on segregation
2. related to the above, a toxic relationship between the city and the suburbs leading to a still widespread attitude of "let it rot" from those north of 8 Mile and west of Telegraph.
3. stability in the auto/manufacturing industries keeping people in middle class jobs without needing an education

If #3 happened, we'd be living in a VERY different world... if #1 and #2 happened, the city would have still declined it just wouldn't have become the worldwide metronym for urban decay. So it would be like Cleveland or Pittsburgh or St. Louis or any other city in the Rust Belt, only probably larger.
I truly believe if Detroit had built a rapid transit system in the 1920's and 1970's (the 2 periods of times when there was a real possibility of building a rapid transit system), it would have been more attractive to the urban pioneers who started moving back to the big cities in the 1970's and 80's, and downtown and the neighborhoods along the rail lines would not have fallen so much for so long. You see this in Chicago, where the most desirable neighborhoods are along rapid transit routes (except for the one that goes to the south side).
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Old 08-15-2015, 10:37 AM
 
Location: Norfolk, VA
6,502 posts, read 6,449,052 times
Reputation: 3703
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nearborn View Post
Because those pesky 20% European-Americans and Mexican-Americans won't leave!
Sounds about right.
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Old 08-20-2015, 09:37 AM
 
7,307 posts, read 9,759,486 times
Reputation: 8727
Quote:
Originally Posted by usroute10 View Post
I truly believe if Detroit had built a rapid transit system in the 1920's and 1970's (the 2 periods of times when there was a real possibility of building a rapid transit system), it would have been more attractive to the urban pioneers who started moving back to the big cities in the 1970's and 80's, and downtown and the neighborhoods along the rail lines would not have fallen so much for so long. You see this in Chicago, where the most desirable neighborhoods are along rapid transit routes (except for the one that goes to the south side).
Sure, but we have a hard time letting go of the past in Detroit, and Henry Ford didn't want public transit. He wanted every family to have a car and use it to go everywhere. For all I know, the Ford family may still have their collective thumb on the scale to make sure that never changes. Not that we have the money to fix anything right now anyhow.
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