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Old 08-20-2008, 09:48 PM
 
16 posts, read 69,268 times
Reputation: 13

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how did the address numbering system in the detroit become so "huge?" has this numbering system been in place for decades? how did it come to be? i know someone who lived in one of the suburbs around I-275 and their house number was in the 40,000's!!!

i guess i just find it a bit odd because being from columbus the highest address numbering we reach is 10,000 and that is at franklin county's very northeast corner out in farm country. anything in the 10,000 block in detroit is still bound to be a heavily urbanized area and that just strikes me as odd. any info would be greatly appreciated because i find this to be a very interesting topic. thanks!
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Old 08-20-2008, 10:48 PM
 
Location: Hamtramck, Detroit, Michigan
60 posts, read 252,503 times
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The entire city was renumbered around 1920 because the old addresses were irregular. Here is a website with more information: Detroit Renumbering Information
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Old 08-22-2008, 09:10 PM
 
225 posts, read 750,109 times
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Out near the western suburbs, the east/west baseline is Cherry Hill. Odd numbers on the west side of the street and even on the east. But when you go south of Cherry Hill, I believe even are on the west and odd on the east. Numbers get higher the farther north and south you are from Cherry Hill. I believe you get about "1000" address digits per half mile. For example at Warren Avenue the addresses would be around 7000 and a mile north at Joy, the north/south addresses would be around 9000.

Also, 8 Mile Road is also known as "Baseline Road" to the west.
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Old 08-28-2008, 09:52 AM
 
Location: Minnesota (SLP)
4,170 posts, read 5,533,041 times
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You want to see funny?? Wisconsin Addresses : W234 N23497 Bigaddress Rd. The whole area in Milwaukee and Waukesha are littered with addresses as such. Not so much the inner city, but anywhere else one looks it's right there.
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Old 09-22-2008, 04:57 PM
 
1 posts, read 6,528 times
Reputation: 10
Default Huge addresses in Wisconsin

Quote:
Originally Posted by slamont61 View Post
You want to see funny?? Wisconsin Addresses : W234 N23497 Bigaddress Rd. The whole area in Milwaukee and Waukesha are littered with addresses as such. Not so much the inner city, but anywhere else one looks it's right there.
There are areas here in Illinois that have something similar: 1 S 6907 Butterfield Road. In Muskego, Wisconsin, our family lived at <big breath> S67 W13882 Hardwicke Place. Yes, I still remember. After all the effort to memorize it, I'd better remember!

I think these address schemes are designed to make it easier for emergency responders (ambulances, etc.) to find a place, especially in exurban areas where there can be wide-open areas with straight roads every mile, then a clump of curvy-wurvy subdivision roads. Not too easy to use a simple grid system, like Chicago's (where everyone knows that 3200 North and 1000 West is Belmont and Sheffield).

The address in Muskego, for example, fits in with Milwaukee's grid: each hundred going west is equivalent to a numbered street, even if an actual street doesn't exist, so it's easier to estimate how far. Our W13882 address put us as far west as 138th Street (so if you're at 76th, you know you're more than halfway out there, at least on the east-west axis), and S67 meant we were 67 hundreds south of National Avenue (or is it Wisconsin Avenue?) even if that road doesn't exist that far out. It's a grid line. Easier to zero in on the location.

Some cities in the West dispense with names altogether and just use grid coordinates for addresses: someone in Salt Lake City could have an address of 1250 North 300 West. You can call the street 300 West if you like, but mainly that's its grid position, and that's all you need.
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