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Old 02-14-2011, 07:42 AM
 
Location: Prairieville, LA
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I plan on getting an australian shepherd or a collie in an apartment. I've done my research, and know these dogs require plenty of exercise. There is a 4 mile trail around a lake near my school. Would a daily jog around that trail be enough?
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Old 02-14-2011, 07:47 AM
 
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It'd be a good start but given the energy levels you'd probably need to take them out for a jog twice a day rather than just once.
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Old 02-14-2011, 08:23 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by carbon 12 View Post
I plan on getting an australian shepherd or a collie in an apartment. I've done my research, and know these dogs require plenty of exercise. There is a 4 mile trail around a lake near my school. Would a daily jog around that trail be enough?
That would be a good start but, as already mentioned, it would be better to do it twice a day. Plus, being herding breeds, they require mental stimulation and "jobs" to do. This can be achieved through obedience and other performance training(i.e. agility, herding, tracking, etc.) and/or teaching tricks.
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Old 02-14-2011, 08:42 AM
 
Location: On the sunny side of a mountain
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A tired dog is a good dog, but as mentioned herding breeds need mental stimulation too. My English Shepherd loves to have tasks to do, get the mail, shut the door, wake up daddy...
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Old 02-14-2011, 08:42 AM
 
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I can't stress enough how high energy an Aussie is! Collies are also a herding breed and can get into a lot of trouble if they are left to their own devices. Could I make a suggestion? Why not contact a breed rescue and try fostering one or the other first? You would be doing a good deed and also get an idea of whether it would be a good fit for your lifestyle!
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Old 02-14-2011, 10:07 AM
 
Location: In the north country fair
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I agree with everything already said.

I've had an Australian Shepherd who was really mellow. But then, she was on the farm every day, all day. She didn't really do much but she was definitely happy outside, in that environment, with other dogs, free to roam. She had been given to us by a typical suburban family with whom she wasn't happy; in fact, she was aggressive with their other dog. But on the farm, she was as happy as a clam and unbelievably mellow.

The Border Collies I have known have been super high energy and in need of major emotional and mental stimulus. Otherwise, expect bizarre, even destructive behavior.

That said, both of these breeds thrive on farms. This doesn't mean that you shouldn't get one. However, I agree that fostering might be a wiser approach if you have little or no experience with either breed and plan on keeping them in an apartment.

I also agree that a dog of either breed will need to go out more than once a day, even on a four-mile jog. I have a GSD, and we go out for short bursts 4-6 times a day.

I also agree that you will need to stimulate the dog as well as give it a lot of exercise. This means play--interaction with your dog, not just taking it outside with you. Herding breeds are task oriented as well as extremely socially-oriented. In fact, one of the reasons that they thrive on farms and ranches--aside from the outdoor environment--is b/c they can be with their caregivers 24/7, which they love. Thus, if you can't be at home during the day, a doggie daycare or dog walker is something to consider.
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Old 02-14-2011, 02:14 PM
 
Location: East Windsor, NJ
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We have an Austrlian Shepherd mix, and as others have mentioned, mental stimulation is just as important as exercise. A 4 mile jog is a great start...I take ours running with me almost every day when its not so icy/snowy out like it has been this winter..the thing that saved us during the past few icy/snowy weeks was mental stimulation...since I couldn't go running outside, things like playing fetch in the house, puzzle toys, hiding bones, and thinking of other little games to play with him, has kept him from destroying things. Also, although I don't think taking him on a 4 mile jog twice a day is absolutely necessary, a long walk at night will be needed because after a morning jog...he'll be ready and raring to go again once its later in the day. Fostering this breed is a great idea to see if they would truly be a good match but keep in mind, every dog is different..and just a side note, both of these breeds will need to be groomed regularly..just something else to think about. Good luck though! Glad to hear you're thinking this through
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Old 02-14-2011, 07:12 PM
 
Location: North Western NJ
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id say make it a jog with an additional evening walk do something like obedience/agility on the weekends.

aussies and borders are INTENSE dogs and if not properly excersized and mentally stimulated they WILL become neurotic messes, we used to have one at the day care i worked at that would STARE at the wall for hours, he hadnt been given enough mental stimulation as a puppy and as a result had become OBSESSED with shadows. he would stand staring at the shadow on the wall for hours, if someone walked infront of him and the shadow moved he would freek out.
you removed him from the wall he would imediatly run back...it was actually quite depressing when you got over how funny this strange behaviour was.

smooth and rough collies are a little less "intense"
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Old 02-14-2011, 07:36 PM
 
Location: Stuck in NE GA right now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by carbon 12 View Post
I plan on getting an australian shepherd or a collie in an apartment. I've done my research, and know these dogs require plenty of exercise. There is a 4 mile trail around a lake near my school. Would a daily jog around that trail be enough?
In a word NO. Find another breed that is more suitable for appartment living and I would be surprised that a reputable breeder would sell you one. These are working breeds and need a lot of stimulation, not just exercise. You may THINK your going to go on that 4 mile jog every day but what about bad weather? If it's too hot or too cold you can't subject your dog to that environment. Also, remember the youngsters need not just one jaunt a day but several and not long ones until they are fully grown but they've still got mega energy.

There are pleny of smaller breeds that would work for you.
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Old 02-14-2011, 10:01 PM
 
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Our Aussie was probably one of the best dogs we ever had. We got him when our daughter was just one and he took over being her bodyguard the day she could walk. His mission in the yard was circling and protecting her. Tho we tried to make him an indoor dog, he preferred sleeping on our screened porch unless the temperature dropped and we made him come in the back room. He loved walks and welcomed several new pets into his life, always taking on the job of herding the pups around the yard. He'd stand watch over our rabbits when they were put in their outside pen. He never went through training, but learned voice and hand commands instantly. He didn't even need a leash to walk by my side. He didn't like the indoors and would circle around to be let out doing what he loved best, protecting our yard. He never intentionally killed, but brought a rat to me and dropped it at my feet. He also ran a possum and armadillo out of the yard. I can't imagine him ever being happy as an apartment dog.
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