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Old 11-26-2011, 12:34 PM
 
Location: 112 Ocean Avenue
5,706 posts, read 9,134,191 times
Reputation: 8919

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In the first half of Georgia’s football game against South Carolina in 2009, Uga VII, who had been dozing on a bag of ice in his air-conditioned sideline doghouse, was cajoled onto the field to pose for pictures with some cheerleaders and Gov. Sonny Perdue. Uga (pronounced UGH-uh) wore his trademark red Georgia jersey and spiked red leather collar, and he looked bored as an ESPN cameraman shoved a camera in his wrinkly, smooshed bulldog face.

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/11/27/ma...gewanted=1&hpw

As a former Bulldog owner I'm glad this article was written and I'm glad the NYT printed it.

This obsession with designing dogs to suit our human fancy needs to stop. We're doing far more harm than good and all dogs are paying the price.

I think humans need to work on resigning themselves and leave the dogs alone.
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Old 11-26-2011, 05:02 PM
 
50 posts, read 222,901 times
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Agreed. I've seen many people in my neighborhood dog park with bulldogs, and most of them look like they'd rather be lying indoors than walking outside. Most English bulldogs in our park don't play; they just sit or slowly waddle around until it's time to go. The breathing problems make it difficult for them to exercise, and many of them end up overweight simply because they refuse to move.

The healthiest English bulldog I've seen could trot (I've never seen her do a full run) for maybe 30 minutes. She had a slightly longer snout than what a show dog would have, and this is just enough to keep her loads more active than other bulldogs that were only a year or two older than her. So she's managed to stay around 50 lbs (not skinny or thin at all, but trim). If she didn't do that bit of exercise everyday, she'd probably be pushing 70 lb or 80 lbs like two other obese bulldogs I know who are similar sized in height and build. It's amazing how much difference a slight tweak can do.

The most unhealthy English Bulldog I've met, the owners wouldn't put in the run to play with their American Bulldog. The English one's trachea was so narrow, they had to make sure it didn't overexert itself. They couldn't even take it to the vet to get the dog fixed, because the vet said that if it was put under, it would be a death sentence.

The NY Times article said that for many flat faced dogs, breathing is like "walking around with your nose or mouth closed and breathing through a straw". I had to try it out when I read it. Didn't have a straw available, but I sucked breath through pursed lips (like I was going to whistle, only in reverse). I couldn't last a minute before I gave up and took a deep breath in relief. I cannot imagine having to breathe like that my entire life!

I feel bad for these poor dogs. I know many bulldog owners care and love them, but if the breed standard was changed to make them healthier, they could be doing so much more. Many more could live and run like real dogs instead of sitting on the sidelines watching life pass by.
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Old 11-26-2011, 10:31 PM
 
Location: 112 Ocean Avenue
5,706 posts, read 9,134,191 times
Reputation: 8919
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pepperpup86 View Post

I feel bad for these poor dogs. I know many bulldog owners care and love them, but if the breed standard was changed to make them healthier, they could be doing so much more. Many more could live and run like real dogs instead of sitting on the sidelines watching life pass by.
Yep, the standard needs to change, but as the article points out, they're very popular just the way they are, and that means more money for everyone.

My Bulldog could breathe fairly well and he did enjoy walks and some exercise. Granted, he was no Rin-Tin-Tin.

I hope like hell dog owners will wake up and demand changes.

On a lighter note (from the article), this is very true :"bulldogs are the most relentless farters in the canine world."
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Old 11-27-2011, 12:17 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, Missouri
9,353 posts, read 19,259,366 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RedJacket View Post
In the first half of Georgia’s football game against South Carolina in 2009, Uga VII, who had been dozing on a bag of ice in his air-conditioned sideline doghouse, was cajoled onto the field to pose for pictures with some cheerleaders and Gov. Sonny Perdue. Uga (pronounced UGH-uh) wore his trademark red Georgia jersey and spiked red leather collar, and he looked bored as an ESPN cameraman shoved a camera in his wrinkly, smooshed bulldog face.

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/11/27/ma...gewanted=1&hpw

As a former Bulldog owner I'm glad this article was written and I'm glad the NYT printed it.

This obsession with designing dogs to suit our human fancy needs to stop. We're doing far more harm than good and all dogs are paying the price.

I think humans need to work on resigning themselves and leave the dogs alone.

you are so right.... ever noticed what the breeders are doing to german shepherds these days??

thanks for sharing a very informative article.....
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Old 11-27-2011, 01:00 PM
 
Location: Cleveland, OH
751 posts, read 2,404,505 times
Reputation: 768
When a dog breed can't have sex on its own or give birth on its own, there is a very serious problem. Those are two of the most basic needs of mammals. Then to make it even better, they have trouble eating and breathing. Two more basic needs that don't come easy like they should.

I had to talk my friend out of getting one a few years ago. Good thing she is willing to educate herself. That dog would have easily cost her $10,000 by the time it was 5. Who has that kind of money?

And I know how easy it is to fall in love with the look of a breed. My favorite breed is the boxer. Who is known for cancer and heart issues. But if making it's nose an inch longer would make it's life better, than that is wha should be done.

Good luck though. The AKC doesn't even like it when women wear pants!
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Old 11-27-2011, 02:31 PM
 
Location: South Park, San Diego
6,086 posts, read 10,023,998 times
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I saw this this morning and I just shake my head knowingly when I see another proud English Bull dog owner at the dog park- say goodbye to your child's college fund, saving up to buy a house, etc...

Great looking dogs and fun personalities but will drain your bank account like nothing you've ever seen compared to most other breeds.

My neighbor spent $1000s every year for his and 3x that for the last few years of its life, and my other neighbor and great friend who is a Vet is absolutely gleeful with those who choose an English Bulldog- they are like Black Friday to him- guaranteeing him plenty of profits for his hospital.
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Old 11-27-2011, 05:11 PM
 
Location: Santa Barbara CA
5,054 posts, read 12,089,982 times
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I have to agree with most of this. My brother has 3 english bulldogs the healthiest is the female Chole who does have a slightly longer muzzle and is a bit taller and slender.She is also very athletic but has that loveable bulldog personality. My brother and his wife do not show the dogs, they are just pets yet they were disappointed when Chloe developed like she has and kept saying I don't think she is purebred. I suggested maybe her breeder gave a rats a-- about the breed and breeds for health not looks but they still seem a bit disappointed.

On the positive side of the breed back when I began agility ther was a female bulldog named LuLu who's owner kept her very lean and you saw them walking miles yes miles every morning while it was still cool and yes LuLu did agility, not the fastest but she was good at it and always sped up when people cheered for her. LuLu even tried herding!She was an amazing bulldog and obviuosly came from good breeding and I do think the fact her owner kept her so trim and gave her a lot of exercise played into it in a bog way too but she did have be be healthy to do it. A few years after I met them they moved away but years later I contacted the owner and she said LuLu died at age 13..not bad for a bulldog.

Here is a photo of Chloe that shows her slightly longer muzzle and believe me it does make a difference.

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Old 11-27-2011, 10:23 PM
 
Location: 112 Ocean Avenue
5,706 posts, read 9,134,191 times
Reputation: 8919
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dashdog View Post
I have to agree with most of this. My brother has 3 english bulldogs the healthiest is the female Chole who does have a slightly longer muzzle and is a bit taller and slender.She is also very athletic but has that loveable bulldog personality. My brother and his wife do not show the dogs, they are just pets yet they were disappointed when Chloe developed like she has and kept saying I don't think she is purebred. I suggested maybe her breeder gave a rats a-- about the breed and breeds for health not looks but they still seem a bit disappointed.

On the positive side of the breed back when I began agility ther was a female bulldog named LuLu who's owner kept her very lean and you saw them walking miles yes miles every morning while it was still cool and yes LuLu did agility, not the fastest but she was good at it and always sped up when people cheered for her. LuLu even tried herding!She was an amazing bulldog and obviuosly came from good breeding and I do think the fact her owner kept her so trim and gave her a lot of exercise played into it in a bog way too but she did have be be healthy to do it. A few years after I met them they moved away but years later I contacted the owner and she said LuLu died at age 13..not bad for a bulldog.

Here is a photo of Chloe that shows her slightly longer muzzle and believe me it does make a difference.
Chloe and my English Bulldog, Winston, could have passed for twins. Same colors, same markings, same longer nose.

He lived 11 years. A brain tumor took him. Great guy.
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