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Old 08-06-2012, 02:47 PM
 
Location: planet octupulous is nearing earths atmosphere
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poor dog... looks painful!! i can feel it..


Bulldog's face, paws and body stuffed with quills in porcupine attack
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Old 08-06-2012, 02:49 PM
 
Location: Kentucky
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Oh man. That's awful. I cannot imagine how bad that hurt
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Old 08-06-2012, 09:45 PM
 
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I couldn't play the video... just couldn't. Poor pooch.
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Old 08-07-2012, 07:17 PM
 
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Poor, poor pup!
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Old 08-09-2012, 01:08 PM
 
Location: Old Mother Idaho
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I've been quilled. It hurts like bloody hell!

I've also had several dogs who have been quilled. The quickest and easiest way to remove quills is to snip off one end, which releases the pressure and fluid inside, then pull the quill out with a pair of pliers. Quills have scales, like hair does; if left un-attended, they will work their way inside the dog's body, where they will continue to work further in, often into the internal organs.

Quilling is semi-common on our ranch, so we've all learned how to de-quill dogs, horses, cattle and us. Since working dogs all have aggressive tendencies toward other animals- intimidating an angry cow is part of their job- some will continue to go after a porcupine, even after they've been hit.

Ironically, my father taught me an odd lesson; he said that if a dog is quilled more than once, the dog gets hooked on all the attention and 'poor dog' stuff, so he used to get after them after pulling out the quills a second time. I never had to do this, as all the working dogs I've had never went after a porcupine again after the first time. I believe his advice was true, as dogs are real attention and sympathy junkies, especially the dogs who are lesser respected by other dogs.

If you are close to a vet, by all means go there for quill removal. But if you are up in the mountains far away from town, it's better to do your best for your dog first- quills can work their way inside very quickly, depending on where they are. Then hustle your dog to the vet.
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Old 08-10-2012, 01:22 PM
 
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WOW!!...betcha that little dog won't go near a porcupine again...guess he learned the hard way.....I'm thinking it wasn't the porcupine that attacked the dog, but the other way around.
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Old 08-10-2012, 06:07 PM
 
Location: Old Mother Idaho
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Quote:
Originally Posted by purehuman View Post
WOW!!...betcha that little dog won't go near a porcupine again...guess he learned the hard way.....I'm thinking it wasn't the porcupine that attacked the dog, but the other way around.
Yup. The porky fears nothing. As long as they are given the road, they won't attack. They seem to ignore everything most of the time. (I actually tripped over the one that quilled me. It was snoozing in the shade of a sagebrush.) But they will attack to defend their young or when they're cornered.

Even then, their attack is identical to their defense- they turn around, display their quills, and back toward the offender. The first attack may the slow, with a lot of quill rattling warnings and a lot of back and forth. They'll run backward toward the dog, but if the dog turns his head away, they'll run forward again immediately. When they are just issuing a little warning, they fluff up all their quills and shake themselves in a warning display, but they only use their tails for an attack, and when it comes up, they are getting serious.

They seldom get serious unless the dog is within range, and most often that's not much more than a foot away.
They can move backwards very quickly once they feel seriously threatened or get angry. Once a porky gets going, one can stay at it, and back up to their attacker several times. It is only when they are furious or desperate that they'll swat their tails, as a swat puts their main weapon into danger of being bitten off, but they will wag their tail in display. A swat is faster and is aimed. Once they swat, they will do it 2-3 times very quickly in succession, but it is very rarely used. Most of the time, they'll run a few steps forward, reverse course and run backwards tail first toward the dog.

They also hunker down when they're serious. They have quills everywhere, but their bellies and inner leg surfaces have fewer quills and they are lighter and softer, so they protect those areas. By then, all their quills are sticking straight up, much like an angry cat's hair. The quills in that stage will come off very easily, but when they are lying flat, they stay in place. While I'm not a vet, I think they get a case of chicken skin that allows the quill to move up in it's follicle. When the skin relaxes, the follicle also relaxes, allowing the quill to move back into it deeper.

Dog's curiosity gets them into trouble. Most dogs will get a quill or two and immediately take off, and they will remember the scent forever. Dogs learn caution from other dogs, so a young dog who sees an older dog shy away from a porcupine track can learn avoidance without ever getting quilled.

City dogs just don't get that experience, and some breeds, like that poor bulldog, just can't move fast enough to get away. At some point, confusion and pain takes over, the dog stops, but the porcupine may still be intent on giving the dog a serious lesson.

Experienced country dogs usually only have one member of a family pack get quilled. They learn it's every dog for himself.
City dogs that are a family pack will more likely go in to defend their pals, so 2 or 3 dogs can get quilled.

Oftentimes, the quills are set into the skin so lightly that a dog can pull them out with no assistance needed. But once in, quills work their way in very quickly. if you can get to the dog within a minute or two, they can be pulled out with the fingers, but that's equally painful for dog and human. A serious attack sets the quills in much deeper, and there will be many more of them.

I once watched a skunk go after a porcupine, and the skunk won. They were both after some eggs in a ground nest, but in the end, neither got any eggs.

I guess stink is a stronger weapon than sting.

Last edited by banjomike; 08-10-2012 at 06:34 PM..
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Old 08-10-2012, 10:13 PM
 
Location: planet octupulous is nearing earths atmosphere
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Quote:
Originally Posted by purehuman View Post
WOW!!...betcha that little dog won't go near a porcupine again...guess he learned the hard way.....I'm thinking it wasn't the porcupine that attacked the dog, but the other way around.

i bet that poor porcupine is bald as a bald beaver
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Old 08-14-2012, 05:53 PM
 
Location: Old Mother Idaho
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Originally Posted by cruxan View Post
i bet that poor porcupine is bald as a bald beaver
Probably not. Quills are just modified hair. The porcupine has many thousands of them, and like hair, shed quills grow out again.
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Old 08-14-2012, 09:28 PM
 
Location: planet octupulous is nearing earths atmosphere
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Quote:
Originally Posted by banjomike View Post
Probably not. Quills are just modified hair. The porcupine has many thousands of them, and like hair, shed quills grow out again.

from the look of the dog that pocuping had to be thinning around the edges
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