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Old 08-08-2012, 08:20 AM
 
3 posts, read 30,905 times
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My husband REFUSES to allow the vet to clean our dog's teeth because he has several friends whose dogs have died after being put under for teeth cleaning.

I just got back from the vet who says our dogs' teeth are really bad and that he really needs a professional cleaning.

Then again, I don't want to have him put under for the cleaning and then DIE and then my husband will never forgive me.

What is your consensus on this topic????
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Old 08-08-2012, 08:30 AM
 
Location: Northern MN
3,869 posts, read 14,564,874 times
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It is rare, but it can happen any time you or a animal is put under.

A busy vet, with techs that are familiar with administering anesthesia
and the chances go down.
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Old 08-08-2012, 08:32 AM
 
Location: ๏̯͡๏﴿ Gwinnett-That's a Civil Matter-County
2,118 posts, read 6,053,544 times
Reputation: 3540
I'd get a second opinion from another vet.

Have them point out what specifically is wrong with your dog's teeth to you.
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Old 08-08-2012, 08:44 AM
 
3,992 posts, read 10,754,885 times
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It is very unlikely. However, dental disease is also a potential killer for dogs. It can cause systemic infection just as in humans. So unless your husband is dumb AND/OR cheap, get him to have the teeth cleaned or he can brush the dog's teeth regularily to help keep the tartar down.

It is not hard to check for tartar on the dog's teeth. They should be clean and white with healthy looking gums and no brown or beige tartar around the roots.

I am always amazed at the stories passed around by people. The vet will want to do blood work and you should go to an experienced vet. There are bad or careless ones out there and there are people who keep going to them because often they are cheap.
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Old 08-08-2012, 09:32 AM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 31,067,395 times
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It's always a risk -- for dogs as well as for humans -- when you get knocked out. I believe, though, that it occurs very infrequently.

I second what cittic10 said: get a second opinion; ask another vet. Why do I say this? When we lived in CT, we lived in town A and went to a vet nearby. That vet told me, on a scale of 1 to 5, with 5 being the worst, that Artie's teeth were teetering on level 3 on their way to level 4. She (strongly) suggested that I make an appointment to get his teeth cleaned. Soon! Fast! NOW!

Well, we were moving to town B in CT and I knew that we'd be changing vets, and that Artie would be due for his annual shortly, and so I'd deal with his teeth after the move. In the back of my mind, I was seriously doubting the vet's urgency. So, we moved, and soon after, off we went for Artie's annual, and I asked the vet about his teeth.

"What about his teeth?"
"What ABOUT his teeth?"
"Do you think he's desperately in need of a cleaning?"
"Desperately??? No. I wouldn't even think of suggesting it. His teeth are fabulous."

That second vet was also the one that solved a few other Artie mysteries that the first vet couldn't.

So, yeah, you might want to get a second opinion.

Last edited by DawnMTL; 08-08-2012 at 09:53 AM..
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Old 08-08-2012, 09:56 AM
 
1,286 posts, read 3,345,689 times
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look into anesthesia-free cleaning. I was skeptical about this for our somewhat skittish shepherd but the people who did it were real pros and she was surprisingly relaxed. Her teeth came out great and it only cost us $100.
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Old 08-08-2012, 10:18 AM
 
Location: North Western NJ
6,591 posts, read 23,969,974 times
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1: getasecnd opinion again 1 vets "desperate for a cleaning" is another vets "normal and safe"
2: ANY surgery is a risk, youminimize the risk by making sure your dog is in good health in all other aspects (physcially) first, both by making sure they are on a good diet and are a healthy weight and with pre-op blood work. you also find a vet you trust that uses some of the newer less risky aneshtesia...
3: start offering NATURAL teeth cleaning option, goo old fashioned RAW meaty bones (and/or a raw diet) are the best ways to keep your dogs teeth nice. my female crestie had horrible teeth when i got her (and she wasnt even a year old yet) as her breeder fed only canned (low quality) dog food...the dry food doesnt help much either, but after a few years on bones her teeth are "normal" for a dog her age.
4: personally unless the dog is at risk health wise (inflamed gums, in pain ect) i wouldnt put them under JUSt for a teeth cleaning, id try to schedual stuff like cleanings with another procedure (ofa xrays, spay/neuter ect)

5: most HEALTHY dogs do perfectly fine with anesthesia and teeth cleanings...if he nows o many dogs that died after teeth cleanings id be a little worried about the general health of all these peoples dogs...its rare for a HELATHY dog to die on the table or after a proceudure...
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Old 08-08-2012, 10:45 PM
 
Location: Land of Red
5,252 posts, read 17,417,294 times
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Along with what has been previously said, age plays a factor as well. If your dog is a senior they will want to run blood work before hand to know more abut the health of your dog. The older the person or animal, the harder time with anesthesia, however as mentioned, the dog can go septic (toxins backing into the bloodstream and eventually into the heart and other vital organs) if proper dental health is not maintained.
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Old 08-09-2012, 12:04 AM
 
Location: Stuck in NE GA right now
4,585 posts, read 11,923,608 times
Reputation: 6667
I brush daily but I also put in my dogs water a product from Jeffers called Triple Pet Plaque Off and let me tell you that stuff really works. My dog went from needing a teeth cleaning to not at all.

Link:
Plaque Off
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Old 08-10-2012, 12:26 PM
 
13,518 posts, read 18,171,493 times
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I've never had my dogs (5 and 6) teeth cleaned....ReturningWest seems to have some interesting advice....why not give that a try
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