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Old 11-06-2013, 08:15 PM
 
2,391 posts, read 4,642,804 times
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I've always attempted but never fully succeeded. My Yorkshire Terrier won't stay still enough. I was able to trim his hair a bit between his paws, but not much. I don't even think he'd let me trim him between his eyes. I have so many issues bathing him, that I end up getting a bath too with him shaking. I think I am going to have to trust a groomer to do him. I had a bad experience this summer and swore I'd do it myself, but after tonight I've given up.
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Old 11-06-2013, 08:33 PM
 
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We have 2 small dogs who are basically 'wash and wear', I can handle the brushing (esp. w/ the one who's easy, the other one is more of a handful and struggles more, of course she's got the thicker coat, so it's short brushing sessions on the floor for her at the end of the day if she's tired, unfortunately Im tired then too, lol) - we go take them for their nails every 4-6 weeks - have done it myself in the past and I get too close to the quick and they bleed and it's just easier - and faster - not to mention safer - to have them do it, we're all more relaxed. Even walking them on sidewalk doesnt really keep their nails short, the groomer is the only way. If I ask, the groomer will dremel the front nails to make them not as sharp (if they put their feet on our legs etc) which is nice.
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Old 11-06-2013, 08:37 PM
 
31,367 posts, read 35,101,711 times
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We've done the grooming on our Schnauzers (pretty simple) and our poodle something mix (not so simple) and we are about to test our questionable skills on our Standard Poodle, but we've been very fortunate to have dogs that have been extremely tolerant of our pathetic attempts. But it sounds to me that you and your dog deserve a break from each other (when it comes to grooming) so give spoil yourselves with a date with a pro.
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Old 11-06-2013, 08:56 PM
 
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I prefer to bathe them myself. Groomers always gave my dogs ear infections.
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Old 11-06-2013, 09:46 PM
ZSP
 
Location: Paradise
1,697 posts, read 4,787,583 times
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My dogs are what I call "rub and buff" so they've never been to a groomer. I do their nails with a dremel.
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Old 11-06-2013, 09:48 PM
 
Location: Texas
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I have collies. Routine brushing is mandatory.
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Old 11-07-2013, 04:27 AM
 
10,599 posts, read 16,542,371 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by veggienut View Post
I've always attempted but never fully succeeded. My Yorkshire Terrier won't stay still enough. I was able to trim his hair a bit between his paws, but not much. I don't even think he'd let me trim him between his eyes. I have so many issues bathing him, that I end up getting a bath too with him shaking. I think I am going to have to trust a groomer to do him. I had a bad experience this summer and swore I'd do it myself, but after tonight I've given up.
First of all, if you put your hand on him, he won't shake.

Don't attempt his eyes! In fact, let that hair grow out to a top knot so you don't have to keep cutting it.

Make grooming a CALM REWARDING EXPERIENCE. Start by calmly grooming him every day as part of relaxation like a massage. BE SURE he's getting a long walk and enough exercise to even be able to BE calm.

You need to be able to brush with a pin brush, use a wire brush if necessary and end up with a DOG comb go over every inch to ensure no mats. Especially in joints and behind the ears.

You can watch a ton of videos on youtube.

Start here - it's a Shih Tzu but the owner is a real expert and shows how she's gotten her dog used to it in a FULL COAT.

This is a SERIES of videos by the owner:


Grooming Series: Introduction - YouTube
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Old 11-07-2013, 05:42 AM
 
10,599 posts, read 16,542,371 times
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Here's that Shih Tzu's bathing video. Click on the "About" tab "Show More" on her channel to see links to all her other videos. (ears, etc)


Grooming Series: Bath Time - YouTube

Last edited by runswithscissors; 11-07-2013 at 05:54 AM..
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Old 11-07-2013, 06:42 AM
 
621 posts, read 1,322,115 times
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Some tips for grooming your pooches....
First, get yourself a table of some sort. A workbench is good, or anything that you can put the pup on that is a comfortable height for you. Trying to work on the dog on your lap, or the floor will take you twice the time and only adds to his ability to out maneuver you . You will never ever see a professional grooming on the floor!!!!! Bad for the back, and just doesn't work.

If there is somehow to clip a lead to the pup and tie it off somewhere, that gives you both hands to work with and the pup can't fall. Best is to be able to tie the lead up so that the dog can't move around a lot. Teach them to be comfy on the table, you want this to be as enjoyable as possible.

Taking the dogs feet and legs away from them is the first part of the war. Once they learn they can't run away, fight with you, but have to just stand there... half of the battle is gone. This is important with the larger breeds as well. Teach them to lie down, lie on their side so you can work on different areas with ease. This takes some time... no rush, take your time.

Have the correct tools! Different brushes work best on different coats. For a yorkie, you need a good slicker brush and metal comb. Collies and double coated breeds need a stiffer bigger slicker, a rake, and a good metal comb with wide teeth.

Start at the bottom and work up! Get the hair combed out around the feet and legs, then the belly, then sides and finally the top. Take your time, be careful you don't brush too hard and scratch the skin. Part the coats on the long coated dogs and work in sections.... carefully untangle snarls with your fingers then comb through. Make sure to check armpits! Sometimes these areas can be clipped short to get rid of the hair there. If you run into a mat or snarl you can easily untangle.... work some creme rinse into it and then try it.

Comb and brush all the way to the skin!!!! Just running the brush over the top of the coat doesn't do it. With a yorkie you should be able to easily run a comb through them when done.

When all else fails, leave it to a professional!!! Find a groomer you like, your dog likes and make them your friend. Good groomers are worth their weight in gold and can help you save lots of money at the Vets by finding "things" you might never have seen. Ask them to show you how to keep the dog maintained between appointments. They will be happy to give you a quick demo... saves them grief and time at your next appointment.
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Old 11-07-2013, 09:25 AM
 
2,391 posts, read 4,642,804 times
Reputation: 922
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hopes View Post
I prefer to bathe them myself. Groomers always gave my dogs ear infections.
The groomer I used a few months ago used some sort of power tool and messed his ear up. I didn't understand what she meant by "he got into glue", or so it sounded like that. The next day I noticed his ear was rough feeling. I went there to the groomer and complained as well as the store manager. Then went to the Vet. She told me that they used a liquid glue since she got to close to the ear with the clippers. I also shouldn't go back and take him the bill from the Vet, as I had intended. They probably have cameras there, and I think they do. Oh, I was so mad. She cut him like a chili bowl, as the Vet said. Never did the butt either~!

Quote:
Originally Posted by ZSP View Post
My dogs are what I call "rub and buff" so they've never been to a groomer. I do their nails with a dremel.
I don't think he would let me use a dremel on him. The last groomer didn't use them due to issues that happened at a Vets office she worked at. Now and then I take him to Petsmart and they dremel his nails.

Quote:
Originally Posted by runswithscissors View Post
First of all, if you put your hand on him, he won't shake.

Don't attempt his eyes! In fact, let that hair grow out to a top knot so you don't have to keep cutting it.

Make grooming a CALM REWARDING EXPERIENCE. Start by calmly grooming him every day as part of relaxation like a massage. BE SURE he's getting a long walk and enough exercise to even be able to BE calm.

You need to be able to brush with a pin brush, use a wire brush if necessary and end up with a DOG comb go over every inch to ensure no mats. Especially in joints and behind the ears.

You can watch a ton of videos on youtube.

Start here - it's a Shih Tzu but the owner is a real expert and shows how she's gotten her dog used to it in a FULL COAT.

This is a SERIES of videos by the owner:


Grooming Series: Introduction - YouTube
I do try to be calm, and I do try to grab him by his beard or his snout area. I have the correct comb and brush and have for years. I've got a few of them too, including a mustache comb. Even bought a video online and some of it helped, but I'm not going to use any power tools as she suggested. I'll look at the video later.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dualie View Post
Some tips for grooming your pooches....
First, get yourself a table of some sort. A workbench is good, or anything that you can put the pup on that is a comfortable height for you. Trying to work on the dog on your lap, or the floor will take you twice the time and only adds to his ability to out maneuver you . You will never ever see a professional grooming on the floor!!!!! Bad for the back, and just doesn't work.

If there is somehow to clip a lead to the pup and tie it off somewhere, that gives you both hands to work with and the pup can't fall. Best is to be able to tie the lead up so that the dog can't move around a lot. Teach them to be comfy on the table, you want this to be as enjoyable as possible.

Taking the dogs feet and legs away from them is the first part of the war. Once they learn they can't run away, fight with you, but have to just stand there... half of the battle is gone. This is important with the larger breeds as well. Teach them to lie down, lie on their side so you can work on different areas with ease. This takes some time... no rush, take your time.

Have the correct tools! Different brushes work best on different coats. For a yorkie, you need a good slicker brush and metal comb. Collies and double coated breeds need a stiffer bigger slicker, a rake, and a good metal comb with wide teeth.

Start at the bottom and work up! Get the hair combed out around the feet and legs, then the belly, then sides and finally the top. Take your time, be careful you don't brush too hard and scratch the skin. Part the coats on the long coated dogs and work in sections.... carefully untangle snarls with your fingers then comb through. Make sure to check armpits! Sometimes these areas can be clipped short to get rid of the hair there. If you run into a mat or snarl you can easily untangle.... work some creme rinse into it and then try it.

Comb and brush all the way to the skin!!!! Just running the brush over the top of the coat doesn't do it. With a yorkie you should be able to easily run a comb through them when done.

When all else fails, leave it to a professional!!! Find a groomer you like, your dog likes and make them your friend. Good groomers are worth their weight in gold and can help you save lots of money at the Vets by finding "things" you might never have seen. Ask them to show you how to keep the dog maintained between appointments. They will be happy to give you a quick demo... saves them grief and time at your next appointment.
I do have a table for him. One I have to use a chair with and the other one I don't. I recently bought a noose with a suction thinking it would help me with his bath. It doesn't. He stands on his hind legs and begs to get out of the tub. That is how he is on the table too. He stands on his hind legs and touches my hands, as if he's saying "now that is enough".
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