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Old 11-24-2013, 07:57 PM
 
1,696 posts, read 4,359,823 times
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It's a tough age. The adolescent phase is often even more trying than the puppy stage.

You're going to need a solid Give It cue. This is to be used to get her to release whatever is in her mouth. 'Give It' (or 'Drop It') is something you practice daily, using toys. It's not a cue that you train during emergency situations when the stolen object is already in the dog's mouth. While you are teaching this cue, it's especially important to keep your house puppy proofed, meaning she just never has any opportunities to steal tissues, papers, napkins, etc. because she simply does not have access to off limits items.

You'll train her to release objects in her mouth using toys. Get her interested in a favorite toy so that she puts it in her mouth. Let her have some fun with the toy, play tug, etc. Then grasp the toy firmly, hold it very still, and ask her to Give It. Make the toy boring so that she is more likely to give it up. If she does so, get all excited and let her have the toy in her mouth again right away. Show her that by giving the toy up, she gets it back right away for more fun. Your energy level is important in this exercise. You have to really make the toy enticing when it is time to have it in her mouth and make it boring when it is time for her to drop it. Think about making the toy "alive" vs. "dead".

If you need extra help training this cue, trading for a treat or a better toy is a fabulous way to introduce the meaning of 'Give It'. If you make the toy boring and dead and she's still latched on tight for quite a while, go ahead and trade for a high value treat and then immediately return the toy to her. Dogs are incredibly willing to give something up if they believe they'll get it right back.

The response to your Give It cue will become automatic (muscle memory) and she will be able to perform it no matter what is in her mouth eventually. If 9 out of 10 times she gives something up you give it right back to her (practice with toys), and 1 time out of 10 (when she's got a used tissue in her mouth) you don't give it back to her, she's still going to go with the odds. She knows any time you ask her to give you something there is a very high likelihood she'll get it right back so she'll be very willing to give it. Whether you return the item to her or not though, always make it a rewarding experience for her to give something up on cue.

Make sure she has plenty of appropriate items to chew on. If she chooses something inappropriate just give her a better option. Again, it's important to minimize her access to inappropriate items as much as possible. Preventing the habit from forming in the first place is always better than having to break a habit later.

In addition to Give It, you should train an Off cue. This will mean she gets off of you if she's mounting you, she'll jump down off the couch if she is chewing your buttons, etc. Again, we train cues during practice sessions in order to prepare to use them in real situations. So to teach her to get off the couch: lure her up with a treat, lure her off as you give your verbal cue, and reward with the treat when she jumps off of the couch. Repeat and gradually fade the lure. Switch the treat to your other hand but still lure her with the treatless hand. Reward when she gets off the couch. Your hand signal for Off can be similar to the lure: point from her nose to the ground, maybe add a snap. Same thing with teaching her to get off of you. Pat your leg to invite her up, lure her off with a treat as you give your verbal cue, reward when all of her paws are off of you.

Humping is one of the most misunderstood dog behaviors I can think of. Dogs hump for a variety of reasons in a variety of contexts. Mounting can be done as part of play, as an outlet for general arousal, as a displacement behavior, as a mechanism for stress alleviation, to get attention or instigate interaction, to test bonds, or because it feels good for the dog i.e. masturbation. I would not make a big deal out of humping. If a dog is annoying another dog by mounting, then sure casually intervene and redirect. If a dog is humping your leg or arm and you don't like it, just say that's enough and give them something better to do. Mounting / humping is more complex than we previously assumed. It doesn't necessarily have anything to do with social dominance. In fact it is more often correlated with affiliative behaviors than status related behaviors.

Last edited by k9coach; 11-24-2013 at 08:07 PM..
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Old 11-25-2013, 12:18 PM
 
Location: Seattle, Washington
2,533 posts, read 4,614,008 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by foxywench View Post
my suggestion
reclaim your home NOW...
Quote:
Originally Posted by runswithscissors View Post
Oh yes, reclaim your home.

LOL "Chihuahuas From Hell" Hall of fame episode. (these are recaps of previous full episodes that were longer)
Quote:
Originally Posted by runswithscissors View Post
This is NACHO, the full episode, who has the possessive qualities you talk about. He's in the previous video I posted
Quote:
Originally Posted by k9coach View Post
It's a tough age. The adolescent phase is often even more trying than the puppy stage.
First off let me say thanks to everyone who has responded. Your input is much appreciated.

I kinda wanna address the video "Chihuahuas from Hell" that was posted. My dog already is showing the exact behavior issues that the dogs in that video have displayed. I honestly feel like I could call that guy up right now and he could come give me lessons like he did the owners in the video.

Her aggression is pretty much like the dogs Nacho and El Diablo although not quite as extreme.

Her issues:

1) Aggressive towards me (resource guarding - chewing buttons, guarding toys, etc)

2) Humping

3) Aggressive towards males that enter my home (I have 2 roommates and she will bark at them every single time she sees them... they are friendly with her and she will be nice and allow them to pet her, etc... but she still barks when they come home... etc... etc...) She DOES NOT act like this toward females.
Is this a "You are entering my territory and I don't like it" kind of thing?

4) Difficult to walk with a leash... she basically refuses to move.

5) Doesn't like collars... although in her defense they are all a little big and loose... I've yet to find one to fit her and that includes using kitten collars. As said she is 2.8 lbs. On a side note, I put a harness on her last night and she REMAINED CALM when my roommates came home. NO BARKING. It was literally her sitting on the floor with her harness on being content. I'VE NEVER SEEN THAT BEFORE! I guess that would be me showing her I'm the pack leader eh?

6) She hasn't been exposed to other dogs but one time... a friend brought her husky over and she pretty much showed the same behavior that she shows males and was barking.

I guess all this is my fault. I most certainly do not want her to grow up to be a monster... I do spoil her and baby her and from what saw in those videos that is the source of the problem.

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Old 11-25-2013, 12:34 PM
 
Location: North Western NJ
6,591 posts, read 24,912,403 times
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the behavior your describing is 100% typical of a dog lacking confidence..., by spoiling and babying and allowing those behaviours your essentially telling the dog that those behaviours are the appropriate reaction to the situation...
"well mommy didn't stop me from biting so it must mean im SUPPOSED to bite" type thinking.

it sounds like you did take charge of the situation and it helped! yay progress, now you just have to keep it up, consistency is a BIG key in training.

I would try exposing her to dogs closer to her own size, again if this is a dog suffering from confidence issues then its bound to get hyper aggressive around a huge strange dog and try to show it whos boss...fight or flight and flights not working lol.

id also suggest training! chis are smart and learning things builds confidence and excersizes the mind and body, a confident dog is a happy dog and a tired dog is a content one! start with the simple ones like sit and stay and walking micely on leash (please note for a Chihuahua id NEVER EVER EVER suggest leash walking by collar, those trecheas are incredibly delicate, leash should be clipped to a harness (and a harness is NO excuse to pull)
for daily collar wear if you need one, go to the small animal section and pick up a collar made for a ferret!

make her work for food and treats by using her brain

DogSpeak 101
one of my favorite trainers, no physical correction, no "alpha dog" (because dogs are not stupid and know your not another dog fighting for dimonance) just a simple concept of teaching a dog how to respect without force, and use its brain.

MOST dog issues are a direct result of human error. the good news is...9 times out of 10, they are correctable!
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Old 11-25-2013, 03:59 PM
 
10,599 posts, read 17,955,956 times
Reputation: 17353
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kees View Post
First off let me say thanks to everyone who has responded. Your input is much appreciated.

I kinda wanna address the video "Chihuahuas from Hell" that was posted. My dog already is showing the exact behavior issues that the dogs in that video have displayed. I honestly feel like I could call that guy up right now and he could come give me lessons like he did the owners in the video.

Her aggression is pretty much like the dogs Nacho and El Diablo although not quite as extreme.

Her issues:

1) Aggressive towards me (resource guarding - chewing buttons, guarding toys, etc)

2) Humping

3) Aggressive towards males that enter my home (I have 2 roommates and she will bark at them every single time she sees them... they are friendly with her and she will be nice and allow them to pet her, etc... but she still barks when they come home... etc... etc...) She DOES NOT act like this toward females.
Is this a "You are entering my territory and I don't like it" kind of thing?

4) Difficult to walk with a leash... she basically refuses to move.

5) Doesn't like collars... although in her defense they are all a little big and loose... I've yet to find one to fit her and that includes using kitten collars. As said she is 2.8 lbs. On a side note, I put a harness on her last night and she REMAINED CALM when my roommates came home. NO BARKING. It was literally her sitting on the floor with her harness on being content. I'VE NEVER SEEN THAT BEFORE! I guess that would be me showing her I'm the pack leader eh?

6) She hasn't been exposed to other dogs but one time... a friend brought her husky over and she pretty much showed the same behavior that she shows males and was barking.

I guess all this is my fault. I most certainly do not want her to grow up to be a monster... I do spoil her and baby her and from what saw in those videos that is the source of the problem.

YEP. More like you being calm, assertive, confident, relaxed and acting matter of fact. Put a little 4 ft. puppy or cat leash on her with the harness and let her get used to dragging it around.

It's NOT about her being a MONSTER. It's about her living a tension, stressed filled unbalanced life. Not fair to her.

YOU OWN THAT DOORWAY. Go there. Make her CALM DOWN a few feet away...before you invite the people in - as long as it takes. REQUEST what you want: "Shht". Or just point. No talking required. CALM. Use your energy not words.

Have them walk in and IGNORE HER COMPLETELY. Let her go sniff them. A SNIFF IS NOT AN INVITATION TO PET. Dogs learn by nose not eyes or ears.

When she wants to be touched she'll ask for it by nudging their hand or something.

Leash her. When she jumps up on the sofa to beat the company to it- calmly and quietly with confidence just guide her off or lift her off, then lead her 3 feet or so away - if you're afraid for her to jump. Maybe get those doggie steps for the furniture.

The good news is, you can see it's ALL "fixable". And you can see that it's quite common.

It's just that if a Rottweiler or Pit Bull did these things it would NOT BE TOLERATED and they'd be condemned, right?

Remember this. ALL DOGS ARE FUNDAMENTALLY THE SAME. Then at a lower level you get into breed characteristics, then individual quirks. However, none of this has anything to do with being a Chi. Except you've been "nurturing" the wrong qualities - like you would a human.

Dogs don't "rationalize". "Oh she's so nice she rescued me, I will try not to stress her out".

It's more like "Oh jeeze there is no leader here so it's all on ME".

Did you see Cesar step on the toy that Nacho had and show the teenager how to do it? Very simple. No negotiating, no talking, no arguing, no anger. He simply did what another DOG would do. OWN IT. NOT PULL IT AWAY, that's how you get bit or they get their brain in tug of war mode. Just stand ON TOP of the item. Until she turns away and give it up (in her brain). Then give her the toy back. This is an exercise. (you see it in the Nacho video) Of course if people are trying this without a professional advising them they better be wearing boots haha.

If dogs want your spot on the sofa, they'll take it. Nudge you away. They're not going to interview you about your ~feelings. hahaha.

You can find the Episode number and Season number on google for each of those dogs, "dog whisperer Nacho" (for example) then go to that guy's channel I posted on youTube and watch the full episodes. It's FUN! And you'll feel better.

I stopped working for VERY FEW clients in my business because of behaviors. ONE was a Chi. My client rescued a second one, and she was insecure, fearful and I could NOT leash her up without drama. I'm a dog walker not a trainer and the girl didn't even give me ONE SINGLE visit in advance, she just thought I should be able to walk in and "change" the dog. NO. I cannot instantaneously change people's dogs for THEM if THE PEOPLE won't change. But I can usually make them act OK for me to get my job done. She was paying the same price for a TWO dog walk with drama (for a half hour) as she was paying for the first, excellent single dog. Uh, no, sorry.

When Cesar Millan says use "Exercise, discipline, THEN affection (last) he means SELF DISCIPLINE so the dog can learn confidence without being paranoid OR dominant towards humans. Until they can write checks and drive cars they're stuck following YOU.

Don't give up on the walks, they are extremely important.

Last edited by runswithscissors; 11-25-2013 at 04:14 PM..
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Old 11-25-2013, 04:06 PM
 
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Did you see Nacho's eyes and face at 1:07? LOL THAT is the look you want to pre-empt. Targeting in his brain before he does it.

I want to stress that these videos are a condensed version of what happens during HOURS at people's homes and by a professional. But you can get the drift and assume your role right now. She showed you last night she wants to be BALANCED.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BlhLT_4ovWI

Last edited by runswithscissors; 11-25-2013 at 04:15 PM..
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Old 11-25-2013, 06:55 PM
 
621 posts, read 1,426,005 times
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I have always had big dog, and when you have big dog puppies, you know they will be big dogs when they grow up. As such, I always began their training for respect and manners very young, because I knew they would only get worse as the puppy grew. And big dogs with bad manners can be dangerous.

I now also have small dogs, and I did treat them differently as puppies! Dumb I know, so don't all yell at me.I know better, but this shows how easily it happens! The difference is they are so little, so dang cute, and so easily just picked up and carried to stop bad things...little dog owners forget they are indeed dogs and we do treat them differently!!! Little dogs with bad manners are just annoying!!!

Wrong, wrong, wrong! I learned my lesson and my little guys get the same discipline as the big guys. Hard to do, but ya gotta do it.
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Old 11-25-2013, 07:30 PM
 
4,231 posts, read 15,454,890 times
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Harnesses are great, we use them for our small dogs (well, not 2 lbs but closer to 15-17 lbs), they have so many out there now but we like the Lupine ones, not the step-in ones or the H style but the older styles that go around their neck and belly w/ a piece that attaches down their back and between their front legs by the underbelly (hope that's clearer than mud, lol), they're reasonable and you do get a lifetime guarantee on them and we use 4ft leashes as they're small dogs and have plenty of rooms (when we had bigger dogs, we did use the 6 ft leashes). Also, the harnesses are easier on their delicate tracheas than collars. Just something to think about, wont add to the good advice bc you've been given plenty - best of luck - she's a beauty.
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Old 11-25-2013, 07:42 PM
 
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No experience with this breed but OH HOW CUTE!
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Old 11-26-2013, 06:29 AM
 
10,599 posts, read 17,955,956 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dualie View Post
I have always had big dog, and when you have big dog puppies, you know they will be big dogs when they grow up. As such, I always began their training for respect and manners very young, because I knew they would only get worse as the puppy grew. And big dogs with bad manners can be dangerous.

I now also have small dogs, and I did treat them differently as puppies! Dumb I know, so don't all yell at me.I know better, but this shows how easily it happens! The difference is they are so little, so dang cute, and so easily just picked up and carried to stop bad things...little dog owners forget they are indeed dogs and we do treat them differently!!! Little dogs with bad manners are just annoying!!!

Wrong, wrong, wrong! I learned my lesson and my little guys get the same discipline as the big guys. Hard to do, but ya gotta do it.
So true!

I have a daily walk with a really small pit bull. She is the cutest thing EVER. She only comes up to my shin. She's about 14 months old, blue, and delicate framed. A runt, I guess.

So after her walk I kill some time on the sofa with her watching Rachel Ray cook (lol).

I make her stay OFF my lap, she's only allowed to sit next to me. Or put her head on my lap sometimes. I let her lean usually because she knows the boundaries.

Anyway, a couple times I used a high pitch voice and fooled around with her like saying stupid stuff playfully and she reacted so excited she IMMEDIATELY jumped up on the back of my neck on my shoulders to "play". Like a dog coat.

HEY!!! DUH. I knew better. It's just like turning a switch on and off.

EVERY single time I break my OWN rules, I re-learn to remember why I have them to begin with. Certain personality of dogs will need to be reminded, too, especially when they're young and getting HABITS formed.
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Old 11-28-2013, 01:21 AM
 
Location: By The Beach In Maine
30,423 posts, read 23,880,742 times
Reputation: 38936
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kees View Post
Really? What gave it away?

I do baby her and let her sleep with me at night... but I don't let her walk all over me... at least I don't think I do.
The fact that your dog is growling and snapping at you when you try to take something away is all anyone needs to know that you are not in control. Your dog is. The poster was right, you need to nip this in the bud NOW, or you are going to have a very out of control dog in the very near future.
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