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Old 01-06-2014, 04:51 PM
 
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Jack Marston (Mr. Marston, Marston, and Mar Mar for short). He is a four month old terrier mix we adopted from the humane society.

This is my first time owning a dog and luckily, my boyfriend is home to give him the attention and training he needs. The first day was definitely overwhelming, but I think my boyfriend and I are getting the hang of it.

A few questions I have:
  • We are crate training Marston. Is it okay to give him food and water within his crate? I feed him twice a day and make sure not to let him graze on food. Should I keep him from drinking water at a certain time, so he doesn't drink too much and eliminate in the crate?
  • He's pretty good walking on a leash, and he's starting to love the outdoors. This means that he's running around A LOT and pulling on the leash. How do I prevent this from happening so I'm not pulling too hard? I try my best to walk next to him or in front of him. I've heard that if he starts to do that, I should immediately turn the other way so he's now walking behind me.
  • Marston is more comfortable eliminating inside than he is outside. We take him out at least once an hour or two to walk and give him time. I can tell he wants to go, because he'll start whining and sniffing around. After a half hour, we'll head inside... and then he goes. How do I correct this? I make sure to use a good cleaner without ammonia.
  • I'm keeping a log of his pooping/peeing, and it seems to change a lot. Is this something that I can dictate? For example, one morning he wanted to eat and then take a walk, so I figured we'd do that this morning... and then he wanted to pee then eat. I know as a puppy, his schedule is going to be all over the place, but I'm not sure if there's something I should do especially in the morning since he just wakes up (should it be pee and then eat or pee, eat, and then walk one more time to make sure?)
  • How do I integrate Marston with two cats? So far, one cat is curious about him (though he was REALLY fussy at first) and the other is scared. Marston will sometimes growl and bark. How
Sorry if my questions are common sense. I did a lot of research on training/puppies online, and I sometimes read conflicting information. If you have any other feedback or information, I would appreciate it.
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Old 01-06-2014, 05:25 PM
 
2,226 posts, read 1,968,391 times
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Originally Posted by drunkwithwords View Post
Jack Marston (Mr. Marston, Marston, and Mar Mar for short). He is a four month old terrier mix we adopted from the humane society.

This is my first time owning a dog and luckily, my boyfriend is home to give him the attention and training he needs. The first day was definitely overwhelming, but I think my boyfriend and I are getting the hang of it.

A few questions I have:
  • We are crate training Marston. Is it okay to give him food and water within his crate? I feed him twice a day and make sure not to let him graze on food. Should I keep him from drinking water at a certain time, so he doesn't drink too much and eliminate in the crate?
  • He's pretty good walking on a leash, and he's starting to love the outdoors. This means that he's running around A LOT and pulling on the leash. How do I prevent this from happening so I'm not pulling too hard? I try my best to walk next to him or in front of him. I've heard that if he starts to do that, I should immediately turn the other way so he's now walking behind me.
  • Marston is more comfortable eliminating inside than he is outside. We take him out at least once an hour or two to walk and give him time. I can tell he wants to go, because he'll start whining and sniffing around. After a half hour, we'll head inside... and then he goes. How do I correct this? I make sure to use a good cleaner without ammonia.
  • I'm keeping a log of his pooping/peeing, and it seems to change a lot. Is this something that I can dictate? For example, one morning he wanted to eat and then take a walk, so I figured we'd do that this morning... and then he wanted to pee then eat. I know as a puppy, his schedule is going to be all over the place, but I'm not sure if there's something I should do especially in the morning since he just wakes up (should it be pee and then eat or pee, eat, and then walk one more time to make sure?)
  • How do I integrate Marston with two cats? So far, one cat is curious about him (though he was REALLY fussy at first) and the other is scared. Marston will sometimes growl and bark. How
Sorry if my questions are common sense. I did a lot of research on training/puppies online, and I sometimes read conflicting information. If you have any other feedback or information, I would appreciate it.
Don't worry about conflicting info, pups are like babies, you raise your own the best way you can and if they are loved and fed, all is good! As to the first thing in the a.m. Schedule, always pee before anything, that was a long nite. Then feed, then 20 minutes to doing real business poop, and a walk and playtime before crating for long period of time. As to cats, they will adjust to each other just fine, let them do it themselves, don't give it a thought. To stop Mars from chasing or barking just give a quick sharp ssssshhhhht....no. To stop behavior you done like. It will just take a short while for him to realize this is a toddlers no, no. The sharp sound catches his attention followed by the sharp no. When he is doing something wrong is the only time he heats the sound and word and will quickly get the connection, terriers are very smart. Have fun and enjoy, stay calm, don't get frustrated and don't keep him locked up too long at any given time. Outside always when coming out of crate and stay outside until he is successful.
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Old 01-06-2014, 05:50 PM
 
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It is perfectly fine to feed in the crate. Many trainers actually recommend this practice in order to create positive associations with the crate so that the dog is always happy to be crated.

If you'd like some extra help with leash walking, you might consider a front hook harness. This is my favorite model: Softouch Concepts, Inc - SENSE-ationĀ® Harness When the leash connects to the front of the dog's body, pulling is dramatically reduced. Rear hook harnesses and any type of neck collar create what is called Oppositional Reflex. Front hook harnesses remove that dynamic.

Whether you use a front hook harness or a regular collar, here is my guide for training polite leash walking:

Dogs pull on-leash because there’s a payoff – it gets them where they want to go faster! If pulling stops working for your dogs, they will stop pulling. Recondition your dog: pulling no longer pays! In the exercise below, pulling actually gets the dog the opposite of what he wants…

Oppositional Reflex: Dogs go against resistance! This means that when we keep a tight, restraining leash, a dog’s instinct is to pull against that. The goal is to get your dog accustomed to the feel of a loose leash, with no straining on either end.

The #1 Rule for teaching polite leash walking is… NEVER FOLLOW A DOG THAT IS PULLING!

When walking your dog, you must REACT each and every time he pulls. You have two options:

1) “Come back to move forward”: Dog pulls, you let out all tension in your leash and STOP moving. You do not continue walking until the dog comes back to your side. (You can call the dog’s name, pat your leg, take a couple steps backward as you bend down, etc. to coax the dog back to your side). Once the dog has returned to you, proceed with your walk!

2) “The Turn Around”: Dog pulls, you let out all tension in your leash and make a U-Turn, continuing to walk in the other direction. Changing direction frequently actually helps teach your dog to keep focused on you!

Your walking pace should be brisk – 4 legs are faster than our 2!

Keep in mind: if pulling has always worked for your dogs in the past, they will persist in trying that trusty old behavior. Changing the way your dog walks on-leash is a process; it will not happen in one training session. Consistency is key here!

When you are leash training, don’t worry about the distance you cover during your walks, just decide how long you’re going to work and adhere to the rules.

Heel

To teach your dog to walk right at your side, let your dog get a whiff of a particularly tempting treat, then draw the treat up toward your chest / eye as you walk forward. Reward your dog for taking a couple steps in the correct position. Give frequent treats at first, then gradually require more steps in Heel position before rewarding. Carefully time your rewards and you will have a Heeler in no-time!

Sometimes owners will say their dog "can't" heel. But if the owner would run or rollerblade or bike instead of walk, the dog would be happy to stay right by their side, never pulling. I mention this just to point out that something people misinterpret as an obedience issue or a sign of disrespect really comes down to nothing more than pace for some dogs. It can be quite aggravating for a dog to walk at our slow speed.

Here are some videos that show how to teach a dog to walk nicely on-leash:


How to train your dog not to pull- Loose Leash Walking - YouTube


Loose-Leash Walking Outside | Teacher's Pet With Victoria Stilwell - YouTube


Now here are the basics of potty training:
  • Frequent trips outside to maximize opportunities for success and therefore rewards. Whatever you think is frequent, make it even more often at first.
  • Accompany dog outside each time. Reward for potties immediately, not once back inside. * Remember: rewards are defined by the dog, not what the human thinks is rewarding. Make sure you aren't bringing the dog directly inside after successful potties. We don't want to teach him that potties equal the end of outdoor time.
  • Constant supervision so that all accidents can be caught and interrupted. The only time you can address an accident is when it is in progress. How you interrupt the accident is very important. If your interruption is intimidating or frightening you will end up with a "sneaky" dog who won't potty in front of people. Your interruption must convey "woops! wrong spot buddy - let's get you to the proper potty place asap" - not "no no bad dog". When he's caught in the act, interrupt by briskly moving toward him while clapping and saying "no no no no no" in a pleasant but urgent HIGH PITCHED tone then RUSH him outside to finish. If he finishes outside, big rewards, praise, and party. If he doesn't finish outside back inside and watch him like a hawk.
  • Confine to a safe zone when direct supervision can not be provided. Safe zone means an area in which he is unlikely to eliminate. During times when you'll be briefly distracted consider tethering the dog to you/keeping him on leash to make sure you eliminate the possibility for accidents to go unnoticed.
  • The worst thing that can happen: accident goes unnoticed. It is it's own reward i.e. "relieving" so he is in effect being rewarded for going in the house.
  • Clean all accidents thoroughly with a specially formulated enzymatic cleaner such as Nature's Miracle or Simple Solution, NOT a regular household cleaner.
  • Never ever show a dog his accident and then punish him for it. After the fact, the dog will NOT make the connection that you are punishing him for pooping in the house. All he'll learn is that you are a highly unstable psycho that lashes out at him unpredictably and for some weird reason involves poop in these meltdowns. If you want to punish someone for accidents, punish the person who was supposed to be watching the dog when the accident happened.
  • Stick to a consistent feeding schedule and learn how soon after eating your pup tends to "go".
  • Be mindful of water intake and let out accordingly.
  • Learn your pup's unique "need to potty" signals and respond accordingly. Potty signals can include sniffing, circling, pacing, staring, vocalizations, and taking a break in play. Always bring pup outside right away after he wakes up in the morning or from a nap.
  • We want your dog's experience to be: "Every time I go to potty in the house I get interrupted. Every time I potty outside, I get treats, praise, play and petting." He'll choose to potty outside.
You mentioned your dog seems much more comfortable pottying inside the house than outside. This likely has to do with what's known as 'substrate preference'. Basically, your dog has become accustomed to the feel of indoor flooring under his feet when he potties. So much so, that the indoor setting / flooring actually triggers him to eliminate. Right now he simply does not associate the outdoors with eliminating. We can change that by practicing the above potty training program.


This is the guide I provide for clients integrating cats and dogs. Take the basic ideas from it and apply to your situation:

Cat is provided a “safe zone” to which dog does not have access.

Exercise below is practiced daily until “safe zone” is no longer necessary.

1) Teach Dog Watch and Leave It. (See videos below).

2) With dog on-leash, release cat into dog area. (Hold end of leash, sit on it, or create a tether attached to a heavy piece of furniture.) Never ever yank on the leash!

3) Ignore “bad” behavior as much as possible. (Dog is restrained/confined and should not be able to do any real damage)

4) Reward with a treat for any steps in the right direction. Examples: Dog looks at cat and stays calm, Dog voluntarily sits or lays down in cat’s presence, Dog looks at you instead of cat, etc.

5) Begin to incorporate Watch and Leave It where appropriate.

6) When dog is generally relaxed in cat’s presence, begin to allow movement throughout the room with dog still on-leash. Reward appropriate behavior. Use Watch and Leave it to redirect unwanted behavior.

7) Final step would be leash attached and dragging behind dog – step on it if necessary. Continue to provide feedback – reward good behavior, redirect inappropriate behavior.

To teach Watch / Eye Contact:



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eiMGJBxRtBw


To teach Leave It:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pEeS2dPpPtA
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Old 01-06-2014, 06:39 PM
 
Location: Stuck in NE GA right now
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Congrats on your new family member oh and BTW it's a major RULE if you get a new dog you have to post photos so we can all oooo and aaahhhh over your new pup.
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Old 01-06-2014, 07:07 PM
 
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I'm impressed! For a first-time dog owner, you asked great questions! K9coach gave you excellent advice!
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Old 01-06-2014, 07:14 PM
 
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Originally Posted by steelstress View Post
I'm impressed! For a first-time dog owner, you asked great questions!
I agree. And you know a puppy owner is dedicated when they are keeping a potty journal! By the way OP - you asked about the morning feeding / potty routine. I'd do potty, then feed, then back out to potty again. Frequent outings are the way to go at this stage.
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Old 01-08-2014, 01:16 AM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
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I can only deal with teaching one thing at a time. If it was me, I'd concentrate on the potty training, and worry about the leash training later. Get a harness so your pup isn't choking.

When I'm training a particular thing, that's the ONLY time they get treats. I get some fantastic treat, and treat for the behavior I want.

A friend in my building just got a 1 year old rescue border collie mix, not housebroken. She gave her treats when she would go outside. She learned really quickly. She gives her a separate command for pee and poop. The dog knows what she is asking her to do, and she gets her treat when she does it.

We live in a hotel, so she also limits the pup's water intake. It's made potty training easier for her, she said.

My rescue is 5 years old and came totally housetrained. But,she hated the crate. So, guess where she got her treat? First I'd throw it in there so she'd have to go into the crate to get it. It was so funny to watch her streeeettttcccchhh as long as she could to try and keep most of her body out of the crate lol!

Then came the day I had to close her in the crate before she was really ready to do that. But she got her favorite treat in the crate with her. She didn't eat it until I got home and let her out (just a short trip). At any rate, I've had her for 2 months, and now she loves her crate. She goes into it all the time, and will go in on command when I say "crate." She knows she will get a special treat every time I send her to her crate. And now she just hangs out in it on her own.

When I had to potty train my last dog, who I got as a puppy, I just took her out a lot. And I would crate her at night and if she didn't do her business outside. She learned really fast, so it wasn't a really long drawn-out thing.

I never feed in the crate, except for the treat. I don't want an accident in the crate.

Jackie is a fierce puller. I tried the u-turn method and it was hilarious. She quickly learned that after we went the other direction, we ended up going the original direction we were going - as in, to the car, for instance. So, she'd happily do the u-turn with me and then hurry to the end of the leash and start pulling again. It was like a fun little game for her. The u-turn game! So, that didn't work for us.

What is working is just stopping every time she starts to pull. She still leads me at this point, and I am okay with that compromise for now. But, I have to stop a lot when she gets excited about going to the car. I quit even calling her back to me. I just stop in our tracks. She'll look back at me and wait for me to go forward again. Right now, I just want her to quit pulling and she is starting to get the drift. I actually don't care if she walks in front of me, as long as she isn't pulling, so that's all I'm aiming for right now. And even though she's in front of me, I can see when she is about to pull, and then decides not to. Funny how you get to know their body language, or the way they change their ears when they're thinking, etc. When I can see that moment when she decides not to pull, I say "Good girl! Good job!" And she'll get all happy and excited. It's so cute. So, we're getting somewhere on the pulling, too.

Check out the muscles on Jackie - the white rat terrier at the front of the pack with the black head. And then you can imagine what a strong puller she is!



Anyway, just give positive reinforcement, don't try to do everything all at once. If you train Marston with love and positive reinforcement - and of course incredible treats - he will want to please you. One day at a time. Enjoy him! You're doing great!

Last edited by NoMoreSnowForMe; 01-08-2014 at 01:34 AM.. Reason: Add photo of Jackie
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Old 01-08-2014, 04:43 AM
 
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Marston will be a very well-behaved dog. His first-time owners certainly know what to consider and will enjoy him all the more for the training. Best wishes and I'm waiting with others for a picture!
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Old 01-08-2014, 08:52 AM
 
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Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
Jackie is a fierce puller. I tried the u-turn method and it was hilarious. She quickly learned that after we went the other direction, we ended up going the original direction we were going - as in, to the car, for instance. So, she'd happily do the u-turn with me and then hurry to the end of the leash and start pulling again. It was like a fun little game for her. The u-turn game! So, that didn't work for us.

What is working is just stopping every time she starts to pull. She still leads me at this point, and I am okay with that compromise for now. But, I have to stop a lot when she gets excited about going to the car. I quit even calling her back to me. I just stop in our tracks. She'll look back at me and wait for me to go forward again. Right now, I just want her to quit pulling and she is starting to get the drift. I actually don't care if she walks in front of me, as long as she isn't pulling, so that's all I'm aiming for right now. And even though she's in front of me, I can see when she is about to pull, and then decides not to. Funny how you get to know their body language, or the way they change their ears when they're thinking, etc. When I can see that moment when she decides not to pull, I say "Good girl! Good job!" And she'll get all happy and excited. It's so cute. So, we're getting somewhere on the pulling, too.
Yes usually one method will work better than the other depending on the dog so awesome job figuring out which one works best for Jackie. I just wanted to show this video about how to handle the common problem of the "yoyo dog". (It sounds like you've got it figured out but wanted to post this in case someone else might find it helpful.)


Stop pulling and "Yo-yoing"- clicker dog training - YouTube


I totally agree with you that it is perfectly fine for a dog to walk ahead as long as they are not straining on the leash.
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Old 01-08-2014, 09:05 AM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
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K9 - great video! Yes, she is a yo-yo dog!

I was surprised you thought it okay for her to walk in front of me. It seems like all trainers want your dog at your side. Granted it would be more convenient, for when she thinks we're going one way, and I have to let her know we're going a different way. But, I only use a 6 foot lead. I don't like those retractable leashes. So, it's not like she can get way in front of me.

I suppose if we ever want to get a training certificate or something, I'll have to get her to walk beside me. But, for now, if I could get her to walk ahead of me, but without the strain on the leash, I'd be in heaven. And we'd go for way more walks lol! Right now I only have enough patience to go on short walks with her, while we work on the pulling, then we get in the car and I take her to the dog park and let her run loose :-)
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