U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Pets > Dogs
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-27-2009, 10:58 PM
 
307 posts, read 1,178,657 times
Reputation: 124

Advertisements

I contacted the vet to find out how much it'll cost. They said $245 including all the shots, cleaning teeth, some medication that makes her go to sleep while cleaning..Is that excessive?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-27-2009, 11:16 PM
 
Location: Kailua Kona, HI
3,199 posts, read 12,837,186 times
Reputation: 3416
Call a few other vets and see what the comparison is in cost. We used to use Sunrise Vet Clinic on Eastern at Bonanza. Very nice people.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-28-2009, 12:15 AM
 
Location: Las Vegas
444 posts, read 1,544,298 times
Reputation: 184
We ran into the same problem(they cited possible future gum disease). We could find no alternative. City-Data does have a pet/dog section. Maybe you'd find a good comparison there. I'm sure the question has come up on that forum as well. Good Luck. My question was, why does my current dog cost so much when all my previous dogs were relatively vet bill free. My how times have changed. And you're afraid not to do the suggested work.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-28-2009, 12:35 AM
 
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada
12,686 posts, read 34,773,406 times
Reputation: 5499
That doesn't sound excessive. I think it was more than that for us. A dog that age has to have tests to make sure he'll survive being put under, and they are expensive. I think we paid even more than that recently. And if you don't do it they could die from their tooth and gum problems. At seven years old they may have to pull a tooth or two also. We have to do it again for the younger dog in August. They have a sale twice a year so that's the time we shoot for to get it done. I know I should be brushing their teeth but it ain't easy when they don't want it done. I found some wipes in a catalog of dog products that I plan to order. You just put one on your finger and rub the teeth. It has the anti tarter stuff on it already so no toothpaste and no brushes.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-28-2009, 12:39 AM
 
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada
12,686 posts, read 34,773,406 times
Reputation: 5499
Quote:
Originally Posted by RedRockAAAA View Post
We ran into the same problem(they cited possible future gum disease). We could find no alternative. City-Data does have a pet/dog section. Maybe you'd find a good comparison there. I'm sure the question has come up on that forum as well. Good Luck. My question was, why does my current dog cost so much when all my previous dogs were relatively vet bill free. My how times have changed. And you're afraid not to do the suggested work.
Yeah, back in the early 60's we had a cat that was hurt somehow...probably lost a fight with a dog. But his front leg was broken almost off and dangled by a thread. He spent over a week at the vet's, recovered completely, and the total bill was about $10.00. The vet said he recovered so well because we went to visit him every day. I guess most people wouldn't do that.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-28-2009, 12:47 AM
 
Location: NW Las Vegas - Lone Mountain
15,756 posts, read 36,384,019 times
Reputation: 2661
The last week of Sprite's way out cost us close to $3000. To bury the pup.

That, by the way, was after some substantial discounts.

Dental on dogs has become a great profit center for vets. Live with it but only every couple of years. It has a rationale. But not too strong a one.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-28-2009, 03:21 AM
 
Location: County Mayo Descendant
2,725 posts, read 5,762,235 times
Reputation: 1216
Not that I want it be expensive to have this done, but I've seen it somewhat higher, are they going to insert an IV during the procedure in case something would go wrong with the anesthesia?

I would check other vets prices also and see what is included in their prices.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-28-2009, 04:54 AM
 
Location: California
10,090 posts, read 40,750,021 times
Reputation: 22149
Actually, I don't think that is a bad price at all. It is the cost of the anesthesia that usually runs the bill so high.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-28-2009, 05:30 AM
 
7,079 posts, read 36,846,930 times
Reputation: 4083
That's CHEAP! Try prices in NYC!!!
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-28-2009, 09:20 AM
 
2,055 posts, read 3,804,469 times
Reputation: 2527
My wife is a vet locally and I know they quote $200 to $400 for a dental and can run up to $600 if there are many extractions. A dental on a dog or cat is not like dental on a human, they must be put under anesthesia and the dental generally includes not only the teeth cleaning but also extracting any decayed or fractured teeth. Depending on the tooth that needs to be extracted and how firmly planted in the mouth it is, they generally have to be surgically removed by a vet and then sewn back up.

Additionally, you have to consider if you are running pre-anesthesia blood work (to check for liver or kidney disease) and are they inserting an IV catheter? With an IV catheter, if there is a problem during anesthesia, they can quickly inject drugs into the blood stream which can save the life of your pet.

If you are getting a cheap price then it most likely not including extractions, blood work, and a catheter. Depending on the age of the animal, those are things you may want.

The reality is that some breeds are more prone to dental disease (especially small breeds like pomeranian, terriers, etc.) and need dentals more often.

National pet dental month is February and most clinics run some type of discount/special during that month.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Pets > Dogs
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2022, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top