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Old 05-08-2009, 06:10 AM
 
Location: California
10,090 posts, read 40,705,049 times
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I don't think one can say male is better over female (or vice-a-versa). I have had both..that were completely devoted and loved me hugged and loved on. I don't think you can teach affection. You may be able to teach the dog to hug or kiss you....but that is a trick, not affection. Different animals show affection in different ways...I have a cat sitting here, that has to touch me if I am sitting...paw on my arm or lap..has to be near me. But try and pick her up for some extra cuddling...no way!
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Old 05-08-2009, 10:47 AM
 
6 posts, read 44,157 times
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Default I DO love her!

Maggie is an adorable dog - like I said - her interaction ranks her as supreme. Basically I was just wondering if the affection she displays is "normal" and if I could ever expect more, which based on everyone's comments it appears to be.

Truth be told, I'm sure my husband would agree that he'd like me to be a "tad" more affectionate myself! Hey, after 32 years, I am what I am.

We also have a male Mini Schnauzer, 5 months - he seems much more loveable, but not as talkative or interactive - he looks to Maggie for most of his wrestling and fun, but he loves his walks and training time and quite receptive! It's a trade off I guess!

I love the miniature schnauzer breed!

Cat
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Old 01-14-2011, 08:34 PM
 
Location: Denver
1,788 posts, read 2,324,474 times
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Every time I see the dog forum, I think of my late black Lab. Greatest dog in the world according to....me. I can still get misty eyed reliving the memories.

What a messed up past four years. Lost my dad...whom I would have given a lung to if he could have taken it. Lost my dog...whom I would give my boat to have back. Lost my mom from vehicular homicide.

Closed my photography business after 12 years. Now we have the Great Recession.....

But I have a lot of good things going on too.

Cats can be good company but dogs make you happy.
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Old 01-15-2011, 07:21 AM
 
Location: North Western NJ
6,591 posts, read 23,969,974 times
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dont worry her behaviour is very nomral, some dogs, just like people are more indpendant and less "needy" in the affection spectrum...

i have 2 chinese cresteds, both love me like crazy and the breed bonds incredibly feircly...
my male loves to be ON me, in my face, very "lovvey" my female however much prefers to be neer me, she doesnt feel the need to be ON me or in my face all the time, its very normal differences in the personality.

she sounds wonderfull!
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Old 09-25-2013, 10:32 AM
 
1 posts, read 2,172 times
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We are thinking of adopting a rescue Boston Terrier in our area. Unfortunately, this lovely dog was kept in a breeding kennel with little to no social skills, and, is very skittish. Had our first visit yesterday and she would not come to us at first, would run when we came close to her, the, gradually, as meet extended a little more, she would come to our hands. She seems comfortable in her now surroundings, however, looks very sad. Also, shakes like a rattle when she is put in a car without another dog. Do you think, with the love that we have (by the way, we have a 10 yr. old Boston now, and just lost her sister to cancer 5 months ago), the closeness and patience we have that she could be a dog that enjoys life so to speak, or, is she too far gone in that regard. The dog we are thinking of adopting is 8 years old. God bless her, she needs someone to love, but I don't want this to become a wishing and hoping circumstance for my husband and me. Any ideas?
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Old 09-25-2013, 11:24 AM
 
10,599 posts, read 16,735,162 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jlffreeman View Post
We are thinking of adopting a rescue Boston Terrier in our area. Unfortunately, this lovely dog was kept in a breeding kennel with little to no social skills, and, is very skittish. Had our first visit yesterday and she would not come to us at first, would run when we came close to her, the, gradually, as meet extended a little more, she would come to our hands. She seems comfortable in her now surroundings, however, looks very sad. Also, shakes like a rattle when she is put in a car without another dog. Do you think, with the love that we have (by the way, we have a 10 yr. old Boston now, and just lost her sister to cancer 5 months ago), the closeness and patience we have that she could be a dog that enjoys life so to speak, or, is she too far gone in that regard. The dog we are thinking of adopting is 8 years old. God bless her, she needs someone to love, but I don't want this to become a wishing and hoping circumstance for my husband and me. Any ideas?
Well my first question is if the existing Boston will be ok with the new one, not the human dynamic. And vice versa. If so, it won't be a problem if you set your expectations to be patient. Also, cheerfully assume she may be a problem house training.

She'll be fine. You're doing a kind thing. Don't approach a fearful skittish dog let her go at her own pace. SMELL is the primary sense they use to get to know you. Don't make a fuss or use alot of eye contact or excitable energy. Be calm and keep things simple. Peaceful. She may love having the existing dog to follow and give her security, too. Don't have a bunch of people coming in and addressing her, anyone who enters must IGNORE and go sit down. Let HER decide if she want's to sniff them...STILL IGNORE...then if she sits near them or paws their hand or some signal she wants attention then can quietly touch her chest. NO FUSS or they'll intimidate her. Treat her like you VISUALIZE. Confident and secure. Don't treat her like you mind thinks "oh she's scared ...it's ok it's ok [high fearful voice]" or you'll reinforce her fears. Act "matter of fact". And don't pick her up if she gets spooked. She has to work through it. The two dogs can be introduced face to REAR not face to face. Polite dog manners are to sniff each other's rear. Neither one should put their head on TOP of the other one (dominance). Also NO food or toy/resource guarding from EITHER one. NObody should be nagging the other one when they eat.

Who knows she might flip and be a typical bouncy dog in no time. Or never. Either way she will adjust and be happy if the humans take the time to let her learn at her own pace and not make a big deal out of her brain being confused. All dogs want to be in balance and need a leader to trust.

Don't live in the past and make reasons for her to not conquer her fears. A pet sitting client of mine did that she just could NOT get past the dog having lived in a breeding crate at a puppy mill for 6 years, and every time the dog freaked out about something she REINFORCED that fear instead of ignoring it and helping her conquer it so for even MORE years, that dog was neurotic. I had to come physically remove her from the crate to walk her and she would freeze or panic outside for no reason. Then when I saw the owner using "sympathy" all the time and acting like being scared was the "right" thing...I got it. Don't do that!

I would suggest a walk there at the place and for SURE when you get home BEFORE you go inside; if she can do so on a leash. It's the best bonding exercise. If that happens, I'd take the existing dog, too. Form a pack bond.

I adopted a similar Bulldog pulled off the euthanasia line, the compassionate animal control officer said "he looked to pathetic to die that day". He gave him to a groomer and I found him there. It was thought he was abused and dumped - stray.

Sick, too. But that's another story. I put nylabones on the floor and he was thrilled. Still ignored me. Took him directly to the vet, then home in a crate, he hid in the back. I kind of ignored him, too in terms of not staring, not LOOMING not using HIGH PITCH "sympathetic" voices. I live alone and had my deceased mother's Lab who was old living there...and we BOTH just acted like he wasn't there. I'd sit next to him and watch TV or read or something. I'd place my hand next to him and wait for him to show interest LOL. He never once acknowledged me petting him in the beginning. He didn't turn his head, he just totally ignored.

He did jump right up on the sofa and I left him there on a towel and pretended to go about my business. I set up an open crate, he liked that, of course SAFETY. But I left the leash on. He looked like this for a long time, like DAYS. He didn't hesitate to eat or drink, though.



My vet estimated him to be eight years old, usual life span for a Bulldog. He had a litany of medical issues. I just thought his last days of life would be happy. That was how I approached it. I also knew he would be ok with me going to work after I took off for a week or two. I had a pet sitter come in at noon.

I'd say in week he was comfortable but terrified of going outside and dependent on being on the leash to feel secure. He would NOT go outside past the threshold to eliminate. He'd go really FAST and RUN back inside. It was big out there!

He paid ABSOLUTELY NO ATTENTION to the Lab. It was hilarious, really, he'd step ON TOP OF HER to pass by to the other room and stuff like she didn't exist! She didn't care LOL.

He was fine in the end. Humble, grateful and no trouble at all. I won't go into all the medical procedures he endured like tail amputation that I thought would be AWFUL but the very same day he was like a new dog being so relieved to be free from the back pain the tail caused, he was actually playful and happy 2 hours after the surgery and LEAPED into the car!

This was him a few months later on his lawn chair and ~helping me in the yard. He LOVED being outside ...finally.







Last edited by runswithscissors; 09-25-2013 at 12:04 PM..
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Old 09-25-2013, 11:47 AM
 
Location: Mostly in my head
19,856 posts, read 63,036,675 times
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What a lovely story, Runs. Thank you for rescuing.
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Old 09-26-2013, 12:10 AM
ZSP
 
Location: Paradise
1,719 posts, read 4,834,026 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SouthernBelleInUtah View Post
What a lovely story, Runs. Thank you for rescuing.
^^this^^

Jiffreeman...I totally agree with runswithscissors. I think this Boston you're considering adopting has every chance in the world to work out and be a member of your family. This is hoping your 10 year old Boston will be accepting of her and vice versa.

I work in Boston Terrier Rescue and puppy mill rescue dogs settle in and yes, they can learn to enjoy the creature comforts of a real home. At times, they seem very, very grateful and eager to please. Time is what it takes...and patience. Thank you for considering rescue.

To the OP...your pup sounds adorable and from experience, I've learned they're all different. I have five dogs, an old female Labx, three Boston Terriers (two females and one male) and a male French Bulldog. All are affectionate except for the male Boston. He came to me at the age of nine as a foster dog who stayed because there were no applications for him. I was able to trace his history back all the way...he'd been sold, given away, sold again, handed over to stranger for safe keeping for a while...then turned out to the streets. He's was a very sad soul...shy, cowering and unsure of everything. But, he came in here and after much butt sniffing and a few curled lips and a little posturing, he's become a real family member. He craves affection and wants to be petted all the time or lay on the couch next to me but does not give kisses or like to be hugged...and that's ok with me.

The other two Bostons and Frenchie are more than affectionate...sometimes too much. LOL
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Old 09-27-2013, 02:14 PM
ZSP
 
Location: Paradise
1,719 posts, read 4,834,026 times
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Jiffreeman...I wanted to post this link for you...check it out. See the difference in this dog between 12 years spent in a breeding cage with nails so long she couldn't have walked if she had been loose And look at her pretty pawdicure and big smile on her face. LOL

After 12 Years as a Breeding Dog in a Rabbit Cage, Faith Is Free | Dogster
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Old 09-30-2013, 11:33 AM
 
Location: All Over
4,004 posts, read 5,620,799 times
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dogs like people have personalitites and just like some people are more physically affectionate than others so are some dogs.

i think a big part of it has to do with how you act with them when they are puppies. if you want a dog thats going to sit in your lap and let you play with him get him used to physical contact and stuff like that when he/she is a puppy. if you dont want a dog like that dont do that.

i dont think you can train a dog to be affectionate. maybe try getting a treat to lure the dog to you and then sit there with teh dog and pet it. the dog may like it and may stick around or may jump off the couch as soon as htey eat the treat.

i have an olde english bulldogge that is loving at time and othertimes goes off on his own and sits alone and a chichuaha who could sit in my lap all day
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