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Old 08-06-2010, 07:58 PM
 
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Wow, this video was just introduced today and is interesting to say the least.



YouTube - ‪Japan: America's Lost Decade‬‎
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Old 08-07-2010, 11:10 AM
 
Location: San Diego California
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Scary stuff, I am afraid what Japan is experiencing is mild compared to what we have to look forward to. We are in much worse shape, and making the same mistakes.
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Old 08-07-2010, 11:56 AM
 
Location: Texas
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~


The future of the planet is deflation.

Why ?

Because of something extremely important the video did not cover.

The world as we have known it is changing forever.


Global birthrates have been dropping the past several decades.

Sometime in this century global population will begin to decline.

The economy as we have known it has never experienced a
sustained drop in population. No more ever increasing demand.
No more ever expanding markets. A future of deflation...
a death knell for the current global economy.


First world nations were first hit by falling birthrates and an
ever aging population. To offset this, third world immigration
has been encouraged into the USA and Europe. But this is only
a temporary fix, because birthrates in third world nations are
also decreasing.

Interestingly... one first world nation with low birthrates and
an aging population did not go the massive immigration route
[because massive immigration destroys ethnos and culture.]
That nation is Japan who has been experiencing deflation for
decades.

Japan's deflation [so far] occurred in a functioning global economy.
What happens to Japan and the rest of us when the world economy
is no longer able to function.



~
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Old 08-07-2010, 12:22 PM
 
Location: South Jordan, Utah
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I am with Kings, deflation is the future. It is all about demographics. You can’t make older people spend like they did when they had kids.
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Old 08-07-2010, 12:34 PM
 
Location: Texas
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~

China, with its huge population, could have inherited the planet.

I say, "could have"... because this is no longer the case.

Decades of China's one child policy has put it on the fast track
to first world childless/aging demographic death.


~
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Old 08-09-2010, 08:07 PM
 
2,592 posts, read 4,869,405 times
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I just don't see deflation. Nothing important or necessary in the past 10 years is cheaper. Energy, oil, food, housing, and transportation are all much more expensive.

The one thing that helped Japan during its lost decade is the average person there was a saver where as the average person here is a debtor.
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Old 08-09-2010, 08:48 PM
 
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Deflation isn't relative to prices alone, this from the Automatic Earth website today, 'Prices do not tell a story by themselves. It is necessary to assess price drivers in order to understand what is unfolding. It is then necessary to adjust prices for changes in the money supply in order to see what is happening to prices in real terms, as opposed to merely nominal terms. Prices in real terms show what is happening to affordability, as it is not price by itself that matters, but price relative to how much money one has in one's pocket' The US monetary system has no built in device to to address the current upset in the credit markets, that's why our government is relying on the same old tired tricks of the past and why they aren't getting the desired results now anymore than they did in the thirties. Capitalism has been a terrific punisher in the past but this time around it will probably devour itself, it takes time to ruin an economic system but time is all that it takes.....
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Old 08-10-2010, 06:46 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jertheber View Post
Deflation isn't relative to prices alone, this from the Automatic Earth website today, 'Prices do not tell a story by themselves. It is necessary to assess price drivers in order to understand what is unfolding. It is then necessary to adjust prices for changes in the money supply in order to see what is happening to prices in real terms, as opposed to merely nominal terms. Prices in real terms show what is happening to affordability, as it is not price by itself that matters, but price relative to how much money one has in one's pocket' The US monetary system has no built in device to to address the current upset in the credit markets, that's why our government is relying on the same old tired tricks of the past and why they aren't getting the desired results now anymore than they did in the thirties. Capitalism has been a terrific punisher in the past but this time around it will probably devour itself, it takes time to ruin an economic system but time is all that it takes.....
Yes, true. It has more to do with the value of your money. I disagree that it is capitalism that is punishing the value of money. The Fed and our own Federal Government has done the most damage.
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Old 08-10-2010, 08:48 AM
 
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The population theory sounds optimistic for the U.S. We have a fertility rate above replacement and let in more immigrants. Let's hope enough demand results to pull us out of the collapse and return to growth.
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Old 08-10-2010, 12:35 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LeavingMA View Post
Yes, true. It has more to do with the value of your money. I disagree that it is capitalism that is punishing the value of money. The Fed and our own Federal Government has done the most damage.
I've never been able to see the separation of our government and the corporations it fronts for, US Capitalism is indeed made up of these two entities that compliment each other in ways that aren't always in our best interest. I see the monetary construct in the US as the practical component of US Capitalism, in my view US Capitalism isn't just a theory, it has to connect with our everyday life at some point, and when it does it can be experienced as living in an economy of ruined currency value. I think this aspect of economics is often overlooked, we don't live in the theoretical economy, we live in an economic reality that defines our well being, regardless of what name tag we put on our economic system we know it shoulders the ultimate responsibility for our monetary health.

Socialism, Communism, and Capitalism all have the best interest of the masses as the foundation of their theoretical construct, but in reality we know that none of these systems has ever worked as well as they appear in theory. In each system there is some kind of government central control over the currency, at least that is the ostensible/theoretical picture that is offered, again, a different reality emerges when these systems are observed from the view of their practical application. In the US this monetary control is really in the hands of the banksters that just took us all for a ride, so much for theoretical Capitalism. We'll never be able to separate the economic system from it's negative monetary consequences.
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