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Old 10-31-2010, 05:38 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 20,084,553 times
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Where are boomers who have been "eased out" recently supposed to find work in areas where jobs are far and few between?

Who (what kind of place) is going to hire someone over 55 or 60?

Yes there are "greeter" jobs but not every boomer, even if healthy and in good shape, can stand on their feet all that long.

I'd like to see a well rounded (not slanted) TV program on this.
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Old 10-31-2010, 08:07 PM
 
8,265 posts, read 11,215,632 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
Where are boomers who have been "eased out" recently supposed to find work in areas where jobs are far and few between?
If there aren't jobs near you one must move to another location where there are.

Quote:
Who (what kind of place) is going to hire someone over 55 or 60?
A company where their experience and skillset is the right fit for an open position.
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Old 11-01-2010, 09:17 AM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 20,084,553 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slackjaw View Post
If there aren't jobs near you one must move to another location where there are.


A company where their experience and skillset is the right fit for an open position.
While I agree to some extent, please consider that most people over 60 are going to be in the running for lower paying jobs. With housing the way it is, how is someone age 63, perhaps, going to be able to sell his house to relocate first of all, and then pick the right place to find a part time job? Would you sell your place and move to another area for $11 an hour? For a job that might be there for how long? What if you couldn't sell? (A bit easier of course if one is single, has no aging parent to look after, and is renting).

In the higher-end job market, his resume is going to be competing not only with thousands of others, but there is a clear preference for hiring those within the vicinity (unless you're a 40-something with sharp, up to date skills and great professional confidence).

Your second comment: What kind of company is going to hire someone so close to retirement age?? And someone who is likely to have health problems based on his age bracket? There are some high rollers like my 65 year old BIL, who continue to get high paying consulting positions post-retirement, but this is entirely a different segment of people than the average working American.
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Old 11-01-2010, 09:43 AM
 
8,265 posts, read 11,215,632 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
While I agree to some extent, please consider that most people over 60 are going to be in the running for lower paying jobs. With housing the way it is, how is someone age 63, perhaps, going to be able to sell his house to relocate first of all, and then pick the right place to find a part time job? Would you sell your place and move to another area for $11 an hour? For a job that might be there for how long? What if you couldn't sell? (A bit easier of course if one is single, has no aging parent to look after, and is renting).
If I couldn't find a job here and needed money for things like food and electricity I'd certainly sell my house and move to another location if I believed I could make $11/hour. I might like my house but what is the alternative if I need to earn a living?

One would hope at age 63 they might even have some equity in the house despite the drop in values, maybe give them some cash to help with the transition.

Quote:
Your second comment: What kind of company is going to hire someone so close to retirement age?? And someone who is likely to have health problems based on his age bracket?
I agree with you that it is a greater challenge to get hired in your 60s, but it isn't impossible. Move to where there are more jobs and start trying to get anything you can.
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Old 11-01-2010, 10:37 AM
 
Location: The Pizzle, FLorida and Poconos in Pa
362 posts, read 326,326 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stars99 View Post
Is this going to effect the supply of McJobs for Gen Y & Gen Z

Why working – a bit – till we drop is the future for baby boomers - Telegraph
I won't quit. But I also won't affect mcjobs. Own my own biz. Don't want to quit. I'd die of boredom. As it is I only work 6 or 7 months out of the year at age 52.
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Old 11-01-2010, 11:50 AM
 
Location: San Diego California
6,797 posts, read 6,641,250 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
Where are boomers who have been "eased out" recently supposed to find work in areas where jobs are far and few between?

Who (what kind of place) is going to hire someone over 55 or 60?

Yes there are "greeter" jobs but not every boomer, even if healthy and in good shape, can stand on their feet all that long.

I'd like to see a well rounded (not slanted) TV program on this.
They will work menial jobs, that along with Social Security will allow them to survive, although you will be stretching the truth somewhat to refer to their situation as golden years. Mostly they will look back in regret about the chances they squandered.
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Old 11-01-2010, 01:10 PM
 
12,801 posts, read 16,498,876 times
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A lot more boomers wonder if they will ever work again. Someone suggested moving to where there are jobs (where?). If everyone did that the places where there are jobs would soon have higher unemployment rates than Detroit.
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Old 11-01-2010, 01:26 PM
 
28,741 posts, read 31,393,299 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slackjaw View Post
If I couldn't find a job here and needed money for things like food and electricity I'd certainly sell my house and move to another location if I believed I could make $11/hour. I might like my house but what is the alternative if I need to earn a living?

One would hope at age 63 they might even have some equity in the house despite the drop in values, maybe give them some cash to help with the transition.


I agree with you that it is a greater challenge to get hired in your 60s, but it isn't impossible. Move to where there are more jobs and start trying to get anything you can.
Slackjaw, I have to side with Newenglandgirl on this one. You're making this sound waaaaaaaay easier than it is.
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Old 11-01-2010, 01:32 PM
 
28,741 posts, read 31,393,299 times
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Originally Posted by sonarrat View Post
I have a different kind of perspective on this because I'm a young pianist and piano teacher who loves the profession. That's something that you can easily do until you croak, be happy with it and not get outmoded by the passage of time. It's much more important for someone like me to have good insurance and a stable home than a fat retirement account, because when I reach "retirement age," I'll still be happily working, earning more than ever, and as a result, I won't see any actual tax benefits from the long-term tax deferral. A Roth might be better, but frankly, by the time I would see any benefit from it, it wouln't even matter anymore. Better to save on my own terms and buy things along the way that make life simpler, a house and a nicer piano, and the like.

For the majority of workers, they have a big government-funded tax loophole in the IRA program and they should take advantage of it. But we shouldn't assume for a minute that it's the right solution for everyone. Lifestyles differ. Some people like to pay as they go, move around, and improvise their own lives as they happen, without being beholden to the usual dreary lockstep career path of the typical wage slave. They just go where they like and do what they do. It's different for sure, but there's nothing wrong with it.
My though is ....what if you get some kind of disease where you can't work? It's always better to have some kind of savings.
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Old 11-01-2010, 01:43 PM
 
Location: Conejo Valley, CA
12,470 posts, read 18,215,974 times
Reputation: 4343
Quote:
Originally Posted by slackjaw View Post
One would hope at age 63 they might even have some equity in the house despite the drop in values, maybe give them some cash to help with the transition.
"Some equity", at 60 they should own the house! Its a little hard to feel sorry for a 60 year old that can't sell their house because they don't have enough equity.

Anyhow, many Americans nowadays seem to believe that they should be able to get a good job and never have to make any sacrifices.
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