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Old 11-15-2010, 12:51 PM
 
16,433 posts, read 20,664,187 times
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The boomers will have to quit working because they'll get laid off eventualy and not be able to find another job. It would be wonderful if we could count on life long employment, but it's not going to happen.
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Old 11-15-2010, 03:03 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
Yep. And across the board, too, from local trash collectors to waiters to dept. store clerks to sales and higher levels.
Yet the historical unemployment level is pretty rocky:



How was this possible with in HappyLand where nobody ever lost their job?
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Old 11-15-2010, 03:40 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 20,516,273 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slackjaw View Post
Yet the historical unemployment level is pretty rocky:



How was this possible with in HappyLand where nobody ever lost their job?

Because I'm talking about the middle class (high, middle, low "middle class" - it was once stratified). Anyone unemployed in the time I'm talking about were mostly from the lower classes (i.e., economically poor population, which did exist then as now).
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Old 11-15-2010, 03:41 PM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,810 posts, read 17,860,644 times
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I remember my dad losing his job in the early 60s, but that is based on my memory rather than any cold hard facts I am able to produce. Maybe that never happened and I'm just imagining that. Maybe the '60s were really much better than I remember them to be.
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Old 11-15-2010, 05:17 PM
 
9,856 posts, read 14,330,551 times
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There are 24 hours in a day. Let's say you work 8, commute 2, and sleep 7. That leaves six hours unaccounted for. If you are worried about never retiring, use a few of those extra hours to learn new skills and train yourself in new, state of the art fields and make sure you have the kind of skills that make you essential to a company. The original article claims that boomers will 'take all of the jobs from gen Y and Z, and that is 100% crap. The job market is not a zero sum equation. I am a gen Y'er, and I plan on creating jobs myself (instead of sitting around waiting for someone else to do it for me). The author of the article seems to think the economy is out of our control. Maybe if people used a few of those free hours they have in the day researching and striving to create value in the economy, we would be in a better place.
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Old 11-15-2010, 07:01 PM
 
Location: Conejo Valley, CA
12,470 posts, read 18,565,373 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
Anyone unemployed in the time I'm talking about were mostly from the lower classes (i.e., economically poor population, which did exist then as now).
During a recession the least skilled workers are always those that have the highest unemployment problems, that is true today as well. Currently the unemployment rate for the educated, those with at least a bachelors, is only around 5%, see here:

UnemploymentEducation.jpg (image)

But you seem to be misusing the word "middle-class", the vast majority of today's middle-class posses a college degree, and as can be seen by the above group, they are doing much better than everyone else. Now, 30 years ago there were more members of the middle-class without degrees.

As I said before, you seem to be mistaking some 50+ folks dropping out of the middle-class for an actual decline in the middle-class. The two aren't the same. Although some 50+ workers with outdated skills have dropped out of the middle-class there have been plenty of college educated 20~40 year old workers to replace them.
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Old 11-15-2010, 07:05 PM
 
Location: Conejo Valley, CA
12,470 posts, read 18,565,373 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CosmicWizard View Post
I remember my dad losing his job in the early 60s, but that is based on my memory rather than any cold hard facts I am able to produce. Maybe that never happened and I'm just imagining that. Maybe the '60s were really much better than I remember them to be.
Maybe, but you are demonstrating once again that you don't understand and apparently don't care about understanding the distinction between a statistic and an single event.
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Old 11-16-2010, 06:47 AM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 20,516,273 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hnsq View Post
There are 24 hours in a day. Let's say you work 8, commute 2, and sleep 7. That leaves six hours unaccounted for. If you are worried about never retiring, use a few of those extra hours to learn new skills and train yourself in new, state of the art fields and make sure you have the kind of skills that make you essential to a company. The original article claims that boomers will 'take all of the jobs from gen Y and Z, and that is 100% crap. The job market is not a zero sum equation. I am a gen Y'er, and I plan on creating jobs myself (instead of sitting around waiting for someone else to do it for me). The author of the article seems to think the economy is out of our control. Maybe if people used a few of those free hours they have in the day researching and striving to create value in the economy, we would be in a better place.
Good points. People in "all collar" jobs can do what you say. In addition, in those hours one can take a certificate course at a local community college or tech program, and also start a sideline so if they lose their job or just need supplemental income they will always have a way to get by. Also, at least one weekend day is generally free for this.
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Old 11-16-2010, 07:44 AM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,810 posts, read 17,860,644 times
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use-id wrote:
Maybe, but you are demonstrating once again that you don't understand and apparently don't care about understanding the distinction between a statistic and an single event.
Lighten up my friend. Not everything needs to be written with absolute seriousness.
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Old 11-16-2010, 08:25 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,017 posts, read 19,353,932 times
Reputation: 32471
Default Nothing personal was implied.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CosmicWizard View Post
Escort Rider wrote:
There is nothing voluntary about paying taxes, and why should there be? Why should you get a free ride and let me pay for your police and fire protection, your public library, paving the streets for you to drive on, picking up your trash, and a ton of other things. Your thinking seems to be very confused.
See this article on the IRS webpage: Voluntary Compliance (http://www.irs.gov/irs/article/0%2C%2Cid=172790%2C00.html - broken link)

I never said anything about a free ride. Your mind is running wild and making things up. During the past 40 years, I might have paid more in taxes than you have, but I'm not gonna berate you for the possibility that you payed less than me.
I was responding to what I perceived as an anti-tax stance on your part. I did not mean to imply that you personally had failed to pay your share of taxes. It was poor drafting on my part; I should have used a word like "anybody" instead of the word "you".
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