U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-07-2011, 03:07 PM
 
8,263 posts, read 11,780,471 times
Reputation: 4793

Advertisements

Oh, I thought he was referring to the fear of Chinese global economic influence, that is what I see expressed in here more often than military invasion.

Don't worry Brother! Most aren't even sure if China can successfully invade Taiwan right now, and that is right across the straits!
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-07-2011, 09:47 PM
 
Location: Tucson/Nogales
22,355 posts, read 26,850,628 times
Reputation: 31106
Quote:
Originally Posted by slackjaw View Post
Oh, I thought he was referring to the fear of Chinese global economic influence, that is what I see expressed in here more often than military invasion.

Don't worry Brother! Most aren't even sure if China can successfully invade Taiwan right now, and that is right across the straits!
Gleaned from a new Economist magazine report on China's growing military strength, it's now within their reach to destroy much our Pacific fleet. Yikes!

Getting closer to Hawaii everyday!
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-08-2011, 08:01 AM
 
8,263 posts, read 11,780,471 times
Reputation: 4793
You are a poor gleaner.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-08-2011, 01:38 PM
 
8,317 posts, read 28,472,305 times
Reputation: 9262
Dismissing China as a very serious potential military threat to the security of the United States is as stupid-ass as those who dismissed Germany and Japan as military threats to the free world before World War II. In fact, if anything, China represents a greater threat to the US today, not because of its strength (which is formidable), but because of the US's relative weakness compared to what the US possessed before World War II--the US then having a much larger basic industrial base, much greater natural resource reserves, and a workforce that knew how to produce real things. About all we have left now to defend ourselves today is a gigantic nuclear capability, which we will likely have to use on a "first-strike" basis in order to win another major "World War" type scenario. Some option . . .
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-08-2011, 01:58 PM
 
8,263 posts, read 11,780,471 times
Reputation: 4793
China has troop strength but very little power projection capabilities. They are trying to put together an aircraft carrier and might even have one by 2015, but right now anyone who claims they are as big a threat as Japan in WW2 is asinine.

Let me guess, your experience with agriculture that led you to predict $500/barrel oil and fuel shortages by 2009 is the same expertise you are using to declare nuclear threat our only option? Please.

Last edited by slackjaw; 01-08-2011 at 02:20 PM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-08-2011, 02:35 PM
 
111 posts, read 287,206 times
Reputation: 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
Dismissing China as a very serious potential military threat to the security of the United States is as stupid-ass as those who dismissed Germany and Japan as military threats to the free world before World War II. In fact, if anything, China represents a greater threat to the US today, not because of its strength (which is formidable), but because of the US's relative weakness compared to what the US possessed before World War II--the US then having a much larger basic industrial base, much greater natural resource reserves, and a workforce that knew how to produce real things. About all we have left now to defend ourselves today is a gigantic nuclear capability, which we will likely have to use on a "first-strike" basis in order to win another major "World War" type scenario. Some option . . .

Dude we have the entire North American continent with unlimited natural resources. That's why the world hates us. We have the Great Lakes! No worries mate, the tinfoil will remain cheap here for the foreseeable future.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-08-2011, 03:02 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,661 posts, read 83,284,427 times
Reputation: 36547
Worst case stratum of scenarios, you're going down with everybody else, and your survival will depend on living by your wits alone. Any lower level of disorder, as long as you are fairly well diversified, the difference between the right and the wrong course will be relatively trivial.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-08-2011, 03:03 PM
 
8,263 posts, read 11,780,471 times
Reputation: 4793
LOL you just took a wrong turn Jerksticks. You can now expect a massive post about how the United States is one blown tire on a truck hauling corn away from mass starvation and cannibalism, one malfunctioning stop switch on a gas pump spilling gas away from the country's industrial complex grinding to a halt, a natural gas leak in a suburban home away from millions freezing do death by March.

Look what you have unleashed... fool.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-09-2011, 04:07 PM
 
8,317 posts, read 28,472,305 times
Reputation: 9262
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jerksticks View Post
Dude we have the entire North American continent with unlimited natural resources. That's why the world hates us. We have the Great Lakes! No worries mate, the tinfoil will remain cheap here for the foreseeable future.
Dream on. First, the US and North America do not have "unlimited" natural resources. No place does, and certainly not in the United States. Many of our cheap, easy-to-produce resources have already been exploited. From here on out, a whole lot of natural resources that we took for granted are going to get a lot more expensive, and may even be in short supply. I should add that setting the US economy into a tizzy doesn't take flat running out of resources, it will just take having them get more expensive. As an example, diesel fuel is trending up toward $4.00/gallon right now in many places. Anything over $4.00 will start causing significant economic difficulties in this country, just as it did in 2008. Imagine if it went to $6.00--really big trouble then. And that is just one commodity.

As for China, I stand on my earlier comment. They have already proven quite adept at stealing our military and industrial technology. They also are rapidly developing the manufacturing power to deploy it. slackjaw forgets history--specifically that Germany and Japan were able to develop an industrial base and war machine before WWII under much less favorable circumstances than China now enjoys, and they managed to do it in less than a decade.

slackjaw can leave his head buried in the sand (or wherever else he has it stuck), but people like him who ignore the lessons of history do so at their peril. And history gives us some pretty solid guidance here--if people bother to study it, which most Americans can not be bothered with doing these days.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-09-2011, 08:02 PM
 
8,263 posts, read 11,780,471 times
Reputation: 4793
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
Germany and Japan were able to develop an industrial base and war machine before WWII under much less favorable circumstances than China now enjoys, and they managed to do it in less than a decade.
Under a decade? If history gives you guidance maybe you should learn it first, Japan didn't develop that navy they fielded in WW2 in under a decade.

Imperial Japanese Navy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

- The Japanese Navy was the third largest navy in the world by 1920 behind the Royal Navy and United States Navy.

- In 1921, it launched the Hōshō, the first purpose-designed aircraft carrier in the world to be completed,[79] and subsequently developed a fleet of aircraft carriers second to none.

- By 1921, Japan's naval expenditure reached nearly 32% of the national budget. In 1941, the Imperial Japanese Navy possessed 10 battleships, 10 aircraft carriers, 38 cruisers (heavy and light), 112 destroyers, 65 submarines, and various auxiliary ships


China has a piece of junk partly finished aircraft carrier they bought from Ukraine, it is assumed it could be used for training at most. Their surface combatants consist of a couple dozen destroyers, some frigates, and a bunch if patrol missile/torpedo boats. They do have a lot of submarines, most of which aren't even nuclear powered.

Despite some modernization and thrusts into the true blue water navy role their entire Naval doctrine is centered around coastal defense. Their navy will not threaten the U.S. navy this decade, period.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:50 PM.

© 2005-2023, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top