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Old 03-12-2011, 02:54 AM
 
Location: Tower of Heaven
4,023 posts, read 6,730,000 times
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ACME INDUSTRIES is a small contract manufacturer with only ten big customers. But those customers are a cross-section of the industrial economy, spanning mining, oil, transport and construction. Right now, Acme’s order book is bulging. “Everyone is up across the board,” says Bob Clifford, the company’s head of sales and marketing.
In one corner of its factory just outside Chicago, three workers polish what looks like a steel Lego brick the size of a steamer trunk. This is designed to channel water underground at high pressure, and will go into natural-gas-drilling equipment. In another corner sit rows of hollow steel cylinders that will hold bearings inside the wheels of gigantic mining trucks being built in nearby Peoria. Mr Clifford points to several parts destined for diesel locomotives built by a subsidiary of Caterpillar a big maker of heavy equipment. Caterpillar is booming, and its ecosystem of suppliers across Illinois is “seeing a real trickle-down effect,” he says.



Manufacturing: Rustbelt recovery | The Economist

GREAT NEWS
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Old 03-12-2011, 03:29 AM
 
10,494 posts, read 24,458,016 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wonderful Jellal View Post
ACME INDUSTRIES is a small contract manufacturer with only ten big customers. But those customers are a cross-section of the industrial economy, spanning mining, oil, transport and construction. Right now, Acme’s order book is bulging. “Everyone is up across the board,” says Bob Clifford, the company’s head of sales and marketing.
In one corner of its factory just outside Chicago, three workers polish what looks like a steel Lego brick the size of a steamer trunk. This is designed to channel water underground at high pressure, and will go into natural-gas-drilling equipment. In another corner sit rows of hollow steel cylinders that will hold bearings inside the wheels of gigantic mining trucks being built in nearby Peoria. Mr Clifford points to several parts destined for diesel locomotives built by a subsidiary of Caterpillar a big maker of heavy equipment. Caterpillar is booming, and its ecosystem of suppliers across Illinois is “seeing a real trickle-down effect,” he says.



Manufacturing: Rustbelt recovery | The Economist

GREAT NEWS
Unfortunately, this is not going to help anything in the long run. Because of nasty trade deals like Nafta, Gatt, etc we are screwed. The facts still are that...
The United States has lost approximately 42,400 factories since 2001

19 Facts About The Deindustrialization Of America That Will Make You Weep
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Old 03-12-2011, 03:45 AM
 
Location: Tower of Heaven
4,023 posts, read 6,730,000 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by las vegas drunk View Post
Unfortunately, this is not going to help anything in the long run. Because of nasty trade deals like Nafta, Gatt, etc we are screwed. The facts still are that...
The United States has lost approximately 42,400 factories since 2001

19 Facts About The Deindustrialization Of America That Will Make You Weep
NAFTA was a great thing, and other free trade treaties can't wait
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Old 03-12-2011, 04:20 AM
 
10,494 posts, read 24,458,016 times
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Originally Posted by Wonderful Jellal View Post
NAFTA was a great thing, and other free trade treaties can't wait
Destroying the manufacturing base of the USA and off shoring our jobs is a great thing??? That is exactly what NAFTA did.
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Old 03-12-2011, 05:16 AM
 
Location: Tower of Heaven
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Stop to whine and complaint all the time, your life is so sad ? If it's that I'm sorry, sincerely, but life isn't so dark, be more optimistic you will be happier
You have all reasons to be optimistic for the US future
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Old 03-12-2011, 05:35 AM
 
10,494 posts, read 24,458,016 times
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Originally Posted by Wonderful Jellal View Post
Stop to whine and complaint all the time, your life is so sad ? If it's that I'm sorry, sincerely, but life isn't so dark, be more optimistic you will be happier
You have all reasons to be optimistic for the US future
Why don't you debate the real issue on how NAFTA, GATT, WTO, and all the other supposedly "free trade" agreements have benefited the USA? You can't, that's why. I will just leave you with Ross Perot debating the globalist scumbag Al Gore on NAFTA. The "giant sucking sound" of our jobs being lost has now been realized.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GhwhMXOxHTg
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Old 03-12-2011, 10:00 AM
 
8,265 posts, read 11,219,882 times
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Originally Posted by las vegas drunk View Post
Unfortunately, this is not going to help anything in the long run.
Why would growth in manufacturing employment and output not help anything in the long run? Go tell someone who has one of thousands of manufacturing jobs that have been added that it didn't help anything.

Quote:
Originally Posted by las vegas drunk View Post
Why don't you debate the real issue (...) You can't, that's why.
Yup, he doesn't have anywhere near the vast library of youtube videos bookmarked that you usually paste under the guise of "debate" does he? Do a few of your Alex Jones ones again, those are the best!
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Old 03-12-2011, 10:37 AM
 
Location: Conejo Valley, CA
12,470 posts, read 18,222,476 times
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Why exactly are people so focused on manufacturing? Is it just oldsters remembering the days past?
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Old 03-12-2011, 11:09 AM
 
10,494 posts, read 24,458,016 times
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Originally Posted by slackjaw View Post
Why would growth in manufacturing employment and output not help anything in the long run? Go tell someone who has one of thousands of manufacturing jobs that have been added that it didn't help anything.


Yup, he doesn't have anywhere near the vast library of youtube videos bookmarked that you usually paste under the guise of "debate" does he? Do a few of your Alex Jones ones again, those are the best!
Most of our manufacturing jobs have already been gutted. A tiny gain back means nothing. Wonderful J said NAFTA was great for the USA which is what I majorly disagree with. I still challenge anyone who can prove how NAFTA has benefited the overall USA economy.
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Old 03-12-2011, 11:24 AM
 
Location: Sitting on a bar stool. Guinness in hand.
4,429 posts, read 5,949,221 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by user_id View Post
Why exactly are people so focused on manufacturing? Is it just oldsters remembering the days past?

Quote:
In its Economic Report of the President last month, Barack Obama’s Council of Economic Advisers calculated that each additional percentage point of another country’s growth boosts its imports from America by three percentage points. It thus expects emerging economies, including Mexico, to account for 71% of America’s export growth from 2009 to 2014—especially in farm products, aircraft, integrated circuits and oil- and gas-field machinery.

Well. I don't mind a bit of a focus on manufacturing in the U.S. but the items I think we need to be focusing on are those ones not easily made in a the 3rd world and/or there is a constant level of quality needed. Of course there is the cost of shipping as well, especially if oil is to rise further. Notice the items that were put forth.

farm products: Just a guess. But I'm assuming the U.S. and Canada are the biggest player for these. And demand will probably only get bigger as other countries are probably going to be looking to import food from us. Now these farm products probably will cost less over all for these products if we make them here and just ship with in the country. But that just a guess by me.

aircraft, integrated circuits: I believe customer will demand a certain level of quality for these products. Now maybe a 3rd world country can produces these products at the level they need to be consistent but maybe not, or at least there is a perception that they can't.

oil- and gas-field machinery: I can't speak to this. I have absolutely no idea what goes into making these products.
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