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Old 03-16-2011, 04:49 PM
 
Location: Planet Eaarth
8,954 posts, read 19,297,758 times
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One point being missed in discussions like these it that the more people want to ride, and do, the more pressure there will be on politicians and road commissioners to provide safe (well, reasonably safe) bike lanes and paths for cyclist to use. In some case providing a bike lane is as simple as painting a lane on existing roads which is cheap in anyones book.
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Old 03-16-2011, 09:54 PM
 
29,887 posts, read 32,992,546 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by texdav View Post
No way a modern econmy can go to bicycles for peroswnal reanprotation. .
That's not really true. A lot of people ride their bikes in Denmark & the Netherlands. On a recent visit to Germany & Austria, bike infrastructure is everywhere.

The biggest problem the US has is that we built everthing to revolve around automobiles. Horrible idea from the standpoint of human health, the environment, and our economy (since we're so dependent on imported oil from unstable dictatorships). We can't quicky turn any of this around....but we could at least make a serious attempt.
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Old 03-16-2011, 10:31 PM
 
Location: Planet Eaarth
8,954 posts, read 19,297,758 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mysticaltyger View Post
That's not really true. A lot of people ride their bikes in Denmark & the Netherlands. On a recent visit to Germany & Austria, bike infrastructure is everywhere.

The biggest problem the US has is that we built everthing to revolve around automobiles. Horrible idea from the standpoint of human health, the environment, and our economy (since we're so dependent on imported oil from unstable dictatorships). We can't quicky turn any of this around....but we could at least make a serious attempt.
It's interesting to note that in the late 1800's & early 1900's the bicycle was the top transportation means except for horses. The car was looked upon as a rich mans toy. About 1920's ,or so, car makers saw that in order to sell more cars they had to kill the bicycle or die. That is when big oil and big cars joined forces to kill mass transit and the bicycle to give us todays non-sustainable roads,cars, cities and suburbia et. all.
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Old 03-17-2011, 09:08 PM
 
Location: Ayrsley
4,714 posts, read 9,070,918 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tightwad View Post
Leave a suit work and wear casual clothes to work/home. Change & freshen when you get to work.

Just don't act like it can't be done 'cause thousands of people do it everyday!
Ok - I'll leave 3 or 4 suits (and shirts) in my office, and keep several more at home for when I need one on evenings and weekends. Although those ones at work will need to be dry-cleaned once in a while, since I can't bring them back to the office cleaned and pressed on a bike, I will have to hire a service to pick them up and deliver them back.

That said, I know it "can" be done - but it is simply not terribly convenient for most people unless they live close to their office and have safe bike routes to and from. Live and work downtown in a major city - no worries. Live in the suburbs 10, 20 or more miles from the office where the highway is the only real option, or somewhere where the weather is not amenable to being exposed to the elements, or when a lot of items have to be carted to work, or when the kids need to be taken to school...it is not realistically feasible in many ways.

Quote:
Originally Posted by David Einstein View Post
Just to be clear, that wasn't a snide remark at people that have to commute a far distance. More at the nations obsession with spreading every urban core out. I think we need more densely populated areas for a host of reasons.
I did not see it that way at all.
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Old 03-18-2011, 11:51 AM
 
Location: Planet Eaarth
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Quote:
That said, I know it "can" be done - but it is simply not terribly convenient
This is the root argument of all the naysayers and lazy people who dislike the very idea of bicycle transportation......They will be inconvenienced when they don't use a car. And that's a damn shame.
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Old 03-18-2011, 04:43 PM
 
Location: Milwaukee
964 posts, read 1,816,095 times
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I rode my bike to work for 10 years and my wife and I only had one car. This changed when my employer moved to a different location and I had to purchase a car. The bike deal worked for me. I saved enough to buy a duplex and now have rental income and have had no debt with the exception of my mortgage.

This isn't going to work for everyone. It takes a great deal of discipline, especially in a cold harsh climate, such as Wisconsin where I reside.

I recommend it to anyone in relatively good shape, has a reasonable commute and is ambitious enough to get out and do it everyday. The money I saved and invested may top 100,000 due to my decision to bike for 10 years. I saved and invested the money I would have spent on car expenses. I would still being doing it if my employer had not moved.
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Old 03-18-2011, 07:24 PM
 
1,446 posts, read 3,376,127 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tightwad View Post
This is the root argument of all the naysayers and lazy people who dislike the very idea of bicycle transportation......They will be inconvenienced when they don't use a car. And that's a damn shame.

Actually, I have a bike and even to go shopping, it would limit my choices in how much I could save and transporting stuff is a pain. A pain as in stuff gets damaged. I am in my 20s and taking physical ability tests for police & firefighters, BTW.

Maybe if I was in Belgium, it could work, but not in a major metropolitan city where employers hire people who live 20-40 miles away.
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Old 03-18-2011, 07:25 PM
 
1,446 posts, read 3,376,127 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mysticaltyger View Post
That's not really true. A lot of people ride their bikes in Denmark & the Netherlands. On a recent visit to Germany & Austria, bike infrastructure is everywhere.

The biggest problem the US has is that we built everthing to revolve around automobiles. Horrible idea from the standpoint of human health, the environment, and our economy (since we're so dependent on imported oil from unstable dictatorships). We can't quicky turn any of this around....but we could at least make a serious attempt.

This.
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Old 03-18-2011, 08:52 PM
 
Location: Charleston, SC
5,615 posts, read 13,854,068 times
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I enjoyed the bike infrastructure in Austria (and the Interurban trail when I lived in Seattle, which was great to commute on). However I couldn't imagine trying to rely on a bike as a commuter in the south. The cold I could handle, but the heat is a different story because you can't just shed layers as you warm up.
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Old 03-18-2011, 10:42 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
28,938 posts, read 48,248,000 times
Reputation: 34960
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tober138 View Post
Ok - I'll leave 3 or 4 suits (and shirts) in my office, and keep several more at home for when I need one on evenings and weekends. Although those ones at work will need to be dry-cleaned once in a while, since I can't bring them back to the office cleaned and pressed
on a bike, ...

You obviously need to train your employer. You mean they don't provide 3 meals a day, free on-site dog and kid sitting / obedience and pre-school for each, on-site FREE dry cleaning, and and on-site bicycle repair facility (not to mention the company swimming pools, spas, and professionally staffed exercise facilities) ... I hope the employers on the left coast don't here about this

Whoops, we are talking business suits here.... I'd say the last time I saw a business suit at work was when I was working in Japan, circa 1990. Guess I best go get a 'real-job'.
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