U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-23-2011, 10:54 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,661 posts, read 78,418,746 times
Reputation: 36331

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by user_id View Post

Unless your dad was vastly over paid this isn't an accurate memory. Movie tickets in 1955 were ~$.60 and the minimum wage (started in 55) was $.75/hour. So 4 tickets would be 3.2 times the minimum wage, once you include all the other stuff your dad would have made 6 times minimum wage... Unskilled, uneducated factory workers didn't get made 6 times minimum wage in 1955....or any period...

Its amusing to what degree people romanticize the past.
But my dad was 55 years old, an no longer making minimum wage, just as adults with families do not live on minimum wage today. (I was making 50c an hour in an after school job. At 18, I was paid a dollar an hour during the summer doing grunt work at a canning factory, loading cases on pallets.) In 1955, my dad hit the $400 a month level, which he was very proud of, after 20 years in the same shop, with grade 4 education. That's a little over $2 an hour. Movie tickets were then 35c for adults, 14c or 20c for kids depending on age. Cigarettes, gas, paperback novels, popular magazines, and a malt were all a quarter. The rent on our nice detached house on a tree-lined street was $60 a month, and in '55, he bought his first new car ever, a Dodge. The tuition fees when I went to state university were $35 per semester, but I paid $135 because I went out of state.

None of that is inaccurate nor romanticized, no matter what "amusing" ideas you want to imagine and hammer into shape to fit what you want so desperately to believe. It is rather insulting for you to come on here an tell people they are lying about things that you know nothing about and don't want to know.

Last edited by jtur88; 08-23-2011 at 11:05 AM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-23-2011, 11:32 AM
 
Location: Conejo Valley, CA
12,470 posts, read 18,192,512 times
Reputation: 4343
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrRational View Post
you're talking in circles again.
umm....really? How so? Again, real wages are higher, a household with a single wage earner can work the same hours and have a higher standard of living today than they would 50 years ago.

You talk about purchasing power, but then what it actually means....
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-23-2011, 11:43 AM
 
Location: Conejo Valley, CA
12,470 posts, read 18,192,512 times
Reputation: 4343
Quote:
Originally Posted by jimhcom View Post
Truth is not many worked for the minimum in those days. My father was a master machinist, in 1958, he was making $5.75hr, the cost of a 3br track house was around $7000, and a new car was around $2000.
Sorry, but that isn't the truth, just another romanticization of the past. Indeed, if few people were working at or below the minimum wage in 1954 why did the government create it in 1955?

I'm not going to put any weight in your memory of what your father made in 1958, but that amounts to $44/hour today. There are machinist that can make that today, though its definitely on the high end.

In 1958 the median cost for a house was around $8,500, in today's dollars $66,000, but a house from 1958 isn't a apples-to-apples comparison with a house today. A house from 1958 would have a electrical system that couldn't handle modern devices, it would have no HVAC, etc and most importantly it would be considerably smaller.

$2000 in 1958 is around $16,000 today, you can buy plenty of cars for $16,000 and they will be dramatically better (last longer, more safe, etc) than a car from the 1958.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jimhcom View Post
If you think factory work is unskilled, then you have no experience working in a factory.
When did I make a universal statement that "factory work is unskilled"? Never, the skill level required depends entirely on what is being done, some factories only need low-skilled workers. Some factories need highly skilled machinists, etc.

Technology has reduce the overall skill level required in factories though.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jimhcom View Post
I know you want to believe these are the best times ever, but they are not.
Again, when did I ever suggest that this is the best of times?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-23-2011, 11:55 AM
 
Location: Conejo Valley, CA
12,470 posts, read 18,192,512 times
Reputation: 4343
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
But my dad was 55 years old, an no longer making minimum wage, just as adults with families do not live on minimum wage today.
Umm, that wasn't my point, you are suggesting that your dad, who was uneducated and unskilled, was making around 6~7 times the minimum wage of that period. That didn't happen...but now you say it was $2/hour..

Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
Movie tickets were then 35c for adults, 14c or 20c for kids depending on age. Cigarettes, gas, paperback novels, popular magazines, and a malt were all a quarter.
Yes I'm sure you wrote down all the prices. Its amusing to me that people put such weight into childhood memories, when every piece of science on memory tells us that our memories are highly inaccurate....especially ones from 50 years ago.

The costs you are citing are not accurate, feel free to look them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
It is rather insulting for you to come on here an tell people they are lying about things that you know nothing about and don't want to know.
I don't think you guys are lying, you really "remember" what you are saying, the issue is that your memories aren't accurate. Nobody has accurate 50-year old memories, just the way the brain works... If you find that insulting well...blame god or whatever else.

If you look up the prices you'll find that they were more than what you remember, almost double....
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-23-2011, 01:15 PM
 
Location: San Diego California
6,797 posts, read 6,626,572 times
Reputation: 5180
Quote:
Originally Posted by user_id View Post
Sorry, but that isn't the truth, just another romanticization of the past. Indeed, if few people were working at or below the minimum wage in 1954 why did the government create it in 1955?

I'm not going to put any weight in your memory of what your father made in 1958, but that amounts to $44/hour today. There are machinist that can make that today, though its definitely on the high end.

In 1958 the median cost for a house was around $8,500, in today's dollars $66,000, but a house from 1958 isn't a apples-to-apples comparison with a house today. A house from 1958 would have a electrical system that couldn't handle modern devices, it would have no HVAC, etc and most importantly it would be considerably smaller.

$2000 in 1958 is around $16,000 today, you can buy plenty of cars for $16,000 and they will be dramatically better (last longer, more safe, etc) than a car from the 1958.


When did I make a universal statement that "factory work is unskilled"? Never, the skill level required depends entirely on what is being done, some factories only need low-skilled workers. Some factories need highly skilled machinists, etc.

Technology has reduce the overall skill level required in factories though.


Again, when did I ever suggest that this is the best of times?
Now that you got your figures straight, ($30,000) you are trying to say everything the government creates is needed. That’s a little bit of a leap isn’t it?
Bottom line is that in the 50's, purchasing a home and supporting a family in the middle class lifestyle of the day was doable on the average Joe’s paycheck. Today it is not. That equates to a lower standard of living in most peoples book. Believe what you want, it makes little difference to the people who were there and know.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-23-2011, 01:26 PM
 
Location: MN
378 posts, read 638,718 times
Reputation: 267
Quote:
Originally Posted by jimhcom View Post
Bottom line is that in the 50's, purchasing a home and supporting a family in the middle class lifestyle of the day was doable on the average Joe’s paycheck. Today it is not. That equates to a lower standard of living in most peoples book. Believe what you want, it makes little difference to the people who were there and know.
The "middle class lifestyle" of today is not the same as that lifestyle in the past. It is much more expensive, IMO unnecessarily and unsustainably so.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-23-2011, 01:50 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,661 posts, read 78,418,746 times
Reputation: 36331
Quote:
Originally Posted by user_id View Post
Umm, that wasn't my point, you are suggesting that your dad, who was uneducated and unskilled, was making around 6~7 times the minimum wage of that period. That didn't happen...but now you say it was $2/hour..

.
No, I did not. You did. You insisted that movie tickets were 65c, and created a whole new set of figures plugging my data into that false presumption.

I said he made enough money in an hour to take two adults and two children to a movie, and buy four more items at 25c each. Somehow you made that come out to 7x75, after inflating a dollar in movie tickets to your faith-based $2.60. In fact, he made almost three times minimum wage, which was not unusual then for a fairly diligent worker after 20 years, even if starting out at the bottom.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-23-2011, 02:01 PM
 
Location: San Diego California
6,797 posts, read 6,626,572 times
Reputation: 5180
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2018 View Post
The "middle class lifestyle" of today is not the same as that lifestyle in the past. It is much more expensive, IMO unnecessarily and unsustainably so.
Very true, another factor that needs to be considered is the lower taxes and interest payments of those days. Today a much larger share of people’s income today goes to taxes, and payments of items bought on credit that would otherwise be available to improve their lifestyle.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-23-2011, 02:14 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,661 posts, read 78,418,746 times
Reputation: 36331
Quote:
Originally Posted by user_id View Post


I don't think you guys are lying, you really "remember" what you are saying, the issue is that your memories aren't accurate. Nobody has accurate 50-year old memories, just the way the brain works... If you find that insulting well...blame god or whatever else.

If you look up the prices you'll find that they were more than what you remember, almost double....
Here are some pictures of things whose prices I "can't remember", but turn out to be exactly what I said they were..

Gas price 1950 image by schmidtsfour on Photobucket

http://26.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_lo...kw8yo1_500.jpg

Copy of 1950's Menu from Woolworth's 5 & 10 Stores ~ Framed - phoenix antiques for sale - backpage.com

http://www.2neatmagazines.com/life/1950cover.html
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-23-2011, 03:53 PM
 
Location: Conejo Valley, CA
12,470 posts, read 18,192,512 times
Reputation: 4343
Quote:
Originally Posted by jimhcom View Post
Bottom line is that in the 50's, purchasing a home and supporting a family in the middle class lifestyle of the day was doable on the average Joe’s paycheck. Today it is not.
This isn't the bottom line, its false if you compare apples-to-apples.

An average family today has a greater purchasing power today than they did in the 1950's, what has changed is the standard of living and today's standard of living is more expensive than the standards in 1950. If you reduce your standard of living to that of the 1950 you'd actually be better off....
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:57 AM.

© 2005-2021, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top