U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 10-14-2011, 11:10 AM
 
5,725 posts, read 9,109,064 times
Reputation: 7981

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by k374 View Post
the young generation is a completely spoiled bunch, given everything on a platter by their parents, I really have no sympathy for them. Now, they even expect lucrative jobs to be ready for them when they graduate...imagine that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cletus Awreetus-Awrightus View Post
exactly. the entire generation is nothing but spoiled brats who don't deserve the opportunity for a job at all.
Myself and my buddies who have bled in Iraq thank you...
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-14-2011, 03:40 PM
 
6,061 posts, read 13,775,928 times
Reputation: 7097
Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
Let's get real. These kids are signing on for a lifetime of debt while they are still in HIGH SCHOOL ... It is a sociological issue.
You're totally right. Good parents should understand that school loans should be a last option, but unfortunately most parents don't even know what all the options are for paying for college.

There should be more awareness made for the various types of college savings accounts. IRS.gov even has info there on the website about a few. They should hand out info when the parents go to prenatal appointments... and on the first day of Kindergarten...

There should be more awareness and info out there for parents. Because this is not a problem that's going to go away until the public becomes better educated.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-14-2011, 04:47 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 20,047,358 times
Reputation: 15719
Quote:
Originally Posted by John23 View Post
If anything, young people have been spoiled by lies and deceit. They never got the right FACTS to make a good judgement about their future.
Kids are led to believe what the adults around them believe and preach. I feel sorry for the lower-class kid who vows to make something of himself by going to college and his parents encourage that and soon they are innocently filling out the FAFSA forms not fully comprehending what a heavy load of student debt for four years means, esp if that kid is going to get out and either get no job or be way underemployed and unable to make the payments. There is something seriously, fundamentally wrong in an education system that would prey on the young and shackle them all their adult lives to this level of debt.

I have a Czech acquaintance who is an M.D. here in the states who got her entire education including medical school tuition-free (not scholarships). She really made something of herself, and didn't even stay in her homeland.

We've got to do something here or these millions of kids coming out of h.s. every year are going to be really stuck. I say college is now a waste of time and money for most. Kids need vocational and business/entrepreneurial tracks starting in junior high. High school, or junior college or business school should be all they need to get a decent job or start their own business.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-14-2011, 06:16 PM
 
27,432 posts, read 56,379,992 times
Reputation: 21808
The flip side is some kids with talent are discouraged from pursuing higher education...

My nieces are very athletic and are making a name for themselves in soccer and swimming... their Dad tells them if they are good enough, it may be their ticket to college.

Not everyone is lost... although many don't have a clue till their mid 30's...
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-14-2011, 06:54 PM
 
Location: Arizona
419 posts, read 690,815 times
Reputation: 862
Default What happened to education!

I graduated H.S. in 1961. Some students went on to college, but I know there were no loans back in those days. Teachers worked tirelessly to help motivated students obtain scholorships and they were quite successful. I suspect the tuition was low enough that many families could afford the cost. The rest of us were educated and trained to obtain jobs. Boy's were educated via vocational schools or shop classes in the general high schools. Girls's in the business curriculm were taught typing & shorthand skills. All of us were prepared to go out into the world with the necessary skills to obtain employment.

After relocating to the Phoenix area in the early 70's, I decided to pursue a college degree. The local community college went out into the community and met with employers to gain knowledge about the curriculm needed to provide students the education to become employable with those employers. In addition, they designed a curriculm for students to successfully transfer to a 4 year university. The administrators & professors were dedicated and worked relentlessly to help their students achieve success.

The tuition at that time at the community college was $45.00 for a full load or $3.00 a credit hour. A fee that I thought was very reasonable back in the day. I know the 4 year university tuition was reasonable as well.

So, what the hell has happened? Has anyone challenged the exhorbiant cost of education? I am confused, so all replies are accepted.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-14-2011, 07:58 PM
 
11,010 posts, read 10,603,637 times
Reputation: 35336
Quote:
So, what the hell has happened? Has anyone challenged the exhorbiant cost of education? I am confused, so all replies are accepted.
Thank you for asking that question.

In 1977, my first semester's tuition at a state university was $260. My son's tuition at the same university in 2011 was $3300 per semester. In fact, the increase last year was more than my $260 tuition was! I am frequently scoffed at by others and told not to complain because tuition is relatively cheap in my state compared to most others. Even so, that increase is more than 10 X. Inflation has gone up in the preceding 33 years, but not by 1000%. Its probably gone up about 300%. So tuition ought to be about $1,000 per semester.

I challenge the cost of exorbitant college tuition all the time. No one pays much attention to me when I do it. The replies fall into these categories:

1. The state has withdrawn support from colleges over the year and they have to charge more to keep up, so leave the poor colleges alone.

2. Your son is getting a deal at $3300 a semester, so shut up and be grateful.

3. Kids shouldn't go to college. They should go to trade or vocational school instead. If you send them to college, you are a sucker.

I think we have done the youth in this country a huge disservice by not fighting harder to keep tuition down. We need to question where the money that used to be subsidizing education is going. I suspect much of it is going to Medicaid to keep pace with new recipients and inflated health care bills. I'd honestly rather keep some subsidies and tell Medicaid recipients (and healthcare providers) they must do with less medical care and reimbursement than defund education. Colleges have a huge number of administrators earning salaries of 200K or better per year. All this needs to be carefully examined. Professors who are actually teaching courses that are needed should be kept. However, I bet colleges could get rid of some high paid administrators with little actual loss to the quality of instruction they provide. Other economies need to be stressed as well. Some lower division courses could be taught over television or computer rather than by a live professor every term. Building budgets should be carefully scrutinized.

I think college is valuable in an information based society that is becoming more competitive and sophisticated. There is no excuse though for the astronomical tuition many institutions are charging.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-14-2011, 11:21 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 20,047,358 times
Reputation: 15719
Quote:
Originally Posted by SCBaker View Post
I graduated H.S. in 1961. Some students went on to college, but I know there were no loans back in those days. Teachers worked tirelessly to help motivated students obtain scholorships and they were quite successful. I suspect the tuition was low enough that many families could afford the cost. The rest of us were educated and trained to obtain jobs. Boy's were educated via vocational schools or shop classes in the general high schools. Girls's in the business curriculm were taught typing & shorthand skills. All of us were prepared to go out into the world with the necessary skills to obtain employment.

After relocating to the Phoenix area in the early 70's, I decided to pursue a college degree. The local community college went out into the community and met with employers to gain knowledge about the curriculm needed to provide students the education to become employable with those employers. In addition, they designed a curriculm for students to successfully transfer to a 4 year university. The administrators & professors were dedicated and worked relentlessly to help their students achieve success.

The tuition at that time at the community college was $45.00 for a full load or $3.00 a credit hour. A fee that I thought was very reasonable back in the day. I know the 4 year university tuition was reasonable as well.

So, what the hell has happened? Has anyone challenged the exhorbiant cost of education? I am confused, so all replies are accepted.

Like many other things in America, profiteers took a good, workable system designed to help people and turned it into a racket. Today, imo, higher education is a racket. It's all about profit. Many liberal arts colleges are high on ambience--campus life, events, food, parties, comraderie--and short on tangible skills both technical and entrepreneurial.

I live near a state "partying" university. The ones who are partying (as I hear it from those I know in the system) are often the ones whose parents are footing the bill. They can get C's as grades and get out and with the family networking manage to get a good job. The lower-class kids studying like crazy unfortunately don't know that it's who you know, or who your family or friends know, that's the ticket. These kids typically do not have the kind of power networks the uppers have. Many do not get careful guidance from teachers or counselors.

As for high school "guidance"--neither my kids nor their friends got any overtures from counselors. They rarely went to the counselors, who were there mostly to push college and tell how to apply for loans. There was no voc training in any of their schools, nor is there any around today in these parts.

As for tuition--back in the 60s I paid $100/semester tuition. I paid it myself, along with books & art supplies and my apt. rental and utilities and food, on hospital jobs all through college. My parents didn't pay a penny, nor were there any loans to be had. I may have gotten a scholarship or two. Even grad school, in my 40s (20 years ago) in a prestigious program at a state U cost only about $6K for tuition, fees and books.

Today, at state U's the fees and mandatory health insurance alone amounts to more than the tuition. Scholarships cover tuition, rarely the fees. Books---you can pay $140+ for a single textbook unless you get the used editions usually marked up inside by some previous owner--if you can get them at all, there's so much competition for them.

Some people insist the good old days didn't exist. I beg to differ.

Last edited by RiverBird; 10-14-2011 at 11:35 PM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-15-2011, 12:50 AM
 
27,432 posts, read 56,379,992 times
Reputation: 21808
Quote:
Originally Posted by markg91359 View Post
Thank you for asking that question.

In 1977, my first semester's tuition at a state university was $260. My son's tuition at the same university in 2011 was $3300 per semester. In fact, the increase last year was more than my $260 tuition was! I am frequently scoffed at by others and told not to complain because tuition is relatively cheap in my state compared to most others. Even so, that increase is more than 10 X. Inflation has gone up in the preceding 33 years, but not by 1000%. Its probably gone up about 300%. So tuition ought to be about $1,000 per semester.
$1.65 an hour when I started and today it's $9.92... a six fold increase in the SF minimum wage.

Also, the student requirement for Health Insurance didn't exist then and it does now and does not come cheap...

Schools say they need more now because of the high cost of keeping up with technology...
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:30 PM.

© 2005-2021, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top