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Old 10-05-2011, 02:50 PM
 
Location: Vermont
10,902 posts, read 12,274,812 times
Reputation: 15768

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ragnarkar View Post
In my 10 years of renting, I've never paid a single $ in property taxes and have never received any notice to collect property taxes from me.

Are you talking about the portion of your "rent" that includes the property taxes the owner pays?
Of course you have. In your ten years of renting every dollar your landlord has paid in property taxes has come from you or another tenant, so yes, you are paying property taxes.
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Old 10-05-2011, 02:55 PM
 
Location: NJ
17,579 posts, read 42,090,772 times
Reputation: 16197
Quote:
Originally Posted by jackmccullough View Post
Of course you have. In your ten years of renting every dollar your landlord has paid in property taxes has come from you or another tenant, so yes, you are paying property taxes.
And if the unit is vacant who pays it?
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Old 10-05-2011, 02:55 PM
 
Location: NJ
29,534 posts, read 34,021,295 times
Reputation: 21958
you are really just paying the landlord for the right to rent his property. it could be someone who has owned the property for many years and has no mortgage on it. it could be someone who bought it at the peak of market price and your rental payment now doesnt cover his costs of mortgage/taxes. the landlord certainly hopes you are paying his mortgage/tax/expenses/profit, but it doesnt always work that way.
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Old 10-05-2011, 03:04 PM
 
Location: Vermont
10,902 posts, read 12,274,812 times
Reputation: 15768
Quote:
Originally Posted by manderly6 View Post
And if the unit is vacant who pays it?
All the tenants who have rented the property, or who are renting other properties the landlord owns.
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Old 10-05-2011, 03:06 PM
 
410 posts, read 680,518 times
Reputation: 561
Maybe I should be asking why nobody comes to fix my house, or clean my carpets, or maintain my landscaping for free at my house.
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Old 10-05-2011, 03:19 PM
 
Location: NJ
17,579 posts, read 42,090,772 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jackmccullough View Post
All the tenants who have rented the property, or who are renting other properties the landlord owns.
You make a lot of assumptions.
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Old 10-05-2011, 03:31 PM
 
Location: Earth
1,480 posts, read 4,666,889 times
Reputation: 1434
Quote:
Originally Posted by RememberMee View Post
Me buying a home will not make things right. Second, if I'll buy a house, it will be a cash only deal. All I want "an equal protection" under handout laws.
The guvmint, in all its wisdom, wants people to own their homes. Making mortgage interest tax deductable is a subsidy to encourage home ownership. The guvmint doesn't need to entice more people to rent apartments, so why should it hand out money to renters?

Who said you're entitled to "equal protection" from taxes, and what are "handout laws"? This isn't charity; it's carrots and sticks.
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Old 10-05-2011, 03:38 PM
 
Location: South Carolina - The Palmetto State
1,147 posts, read 1,657,884 times
Reputation: 1459
Quote:
Originally Posted by jifwittle View Post
Maybe I should be asking why nobody comes to fix my house, or clean my carpets, or maintain my landscaping for free at my house.
Yes - I had a defective dishwater leak water than ruined my kitchen floor - had to be torn up and replaced, so where was my "handout"??

There is a lot of needy families and the food bank where we volunteer and give supplies to weekly - maybe since the OP is all for "handouts", maybe he/she would like to walk the collectivist talk and open up their wallet - if anyone is deserving of a handout, it would be these needy families.

Or does he/she exempt themselves from their ideology??
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Old 10-05-2011, 03:42 PM
 
410 posts, read 680,518 times
Reputation: 561
Quote:
Originally Posted by cougfan View Post
Yes - I had a defective dishwater leak water than ruined my kitchen floor - had to be torn up and replaced, so where was my "handout"??

There is a lot of needy families and the food bank where we volunteer and give supplies to weekly - maybe since the OP is all for "handouts", maybe he/she would like to walk the collectivist talk and open up their wallet - if anyone is deserving of a handout, it would be these needy families.

Or does he/she exempt themselves from their ideology??
Exactly.

Your rent may in part help pay for the landlord's property taxes, but renters have far less responsibility, financial or other, for the care and upkeep of your living space. THAT is what you pay for when you are renting.
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Old 10-05-2011, 03:56 PM
 
179 posts, read 241,421 times
Reputation: 79
The landlord has to pay tax on net Rental income after subtract some rental expenses. Mortgage int would be probably eliminated for richers who have more than 1/2 million principal loans and certain levels of high income people.
Mortgage int and property tax are deductible for first two houses. The first one is considered primary and second one is vacation house in tax law. The deductible of mortgage int applied for the third house is limit. Landlord can claim 1/2 amount of mortgage int is deductible for third house or investment house. The limit also applied to home loan equity credit such as subprime loan up to 1 million principal only. Gov't encourages ownership . If people can not afford for rent or low income, Gov't has housing or section 8 to help those people.
Many more tax law are favorite for Landlord because gov't wants to encourage people invest in housing market.
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