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Old 07-14-2012, 10:27 PM
 
6,566 posts, read 7,843,882 times
Reputation: 3832

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Quote:
Originally Posted by andywire View Post
From a very basic dollar perspective, an engineer should have a good understanding of the most efficient, practical (and cheapest) methods which can be employed to produce the design they seek. Why spend $100 when you could spend $50, and still accomplish the goal of the design? Why require a tighter tolerance on a dimension than necessary? I'm just gonna charge you more for it. From a business sense, an engineer with an appreciation for the practical side (and perhaps getting a bit dirty) are the most sought after in any place I've ever worked. The Duke and Purdue guys I worked with were required to spend time on machines making parts. Not because the company was going to make money off them. Because they wanted them to gain some practical insight.

One of the best engineers I ever worked with would spend 1/2 the day in the office. The other half was spent on the floor, sweating his butt off in the 90 degree heat, hunched over machines. There wasn't any job he couldn't get running. Started out cutting CAM tracers in his father's shop at age 13. Those kinds of engineers are rare, and can name there price. I wish he wasn't so busy during the workday, I could have learned a ton more from him.

Personally, I have little vested interest in production any longer. It's dominated by margins, risk vs reward matrix, algorithms, tool life equations, time vs money... The heart and soul of actually making stuff has been widdled away, along with the actual craftsmanship. The way I view it... If your bucket is fuller at the end of the day, you're doing fine. I don't think we need any more 6 sigma $300/hr consultants running around. Not every equation can prove true in every type of setting, or type of work.

The problem is many companies use engineers to do everything but engineering. Many of the engineers I work with are really project managers. They send e-mails, setup meetings, update their red/yellow/green status spreadsheets, chase parts, chase suppliers, etc. However, when a detailed fluid flow analysis is required that work gets outsourced.
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Old 07-14-2012, 11:39 PM
 
Location: IN
22,309 posts, read 38,939,867 times
Reputation: 14872
Quote:
Originally Posted by Edmund_Burke View Post
CPA or/and cma is ideal.

Yay, I'd incur more student loan debt. However, I think an Accounting degree is probably the best for job security because you can easily find a job without too much effort.
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Old 07-15-2012, 12:30 AM
 
Location: State of Transition
88,174 posts, read 82,200,765 times
Reputation: 92494
The tech sector kills for engineers. Get the right engineering job, and you have guaranteed employment for life.
Banking.
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Old 07-15-2012, 02:20 AM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
27,303 posts, read 45,468,661 times
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Actuaries will continue to be in strong demand.

Accounting is probably the BEST business degree to get a decent foundation. Marketing pays the best, but accountants (honest ones) don't often pursue sales. Accounting is a good bridge to another HUGE growth job... senior (EXPERIENCED) investment advisers for retirees.

Engineering will continue to grow and even technical manufacturing skills are in seeing significant upward pay pressure.

As the truth comes out... (USA Education system has crippled the new job seekers) EXPERIENCED and competent workers become a premium. I was doing some work with HR resource planning this weekend. Employers SEEK someone who can walk in the door and GO TO WORK to make the company money AND to off-load owners / managers. They are finding that early retirees / older workers are just the ticket.

Several employers commented that younger workers have no basic skills (like reading a tape measure and answering the phone / placing and following through on ordering / Customer care.) There are also significant battles off personalities, that older workers know how to defuse/ignore.

Who would YOU hire to move your company forward?
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Old 07-15-2012, 08:39 AM
 
6,566 posts, read 7,843,882 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
Get the right engineering job, and you have guaranteed employment for life.

I know many engineers who were laid off in 2008/2009. They may have a different opinion.
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Old 07-15-2012, 12:11 PM
 
Location: IN
22,309 posts, read 38,939,867 times
Reputation: 14872
Quote:
Originally Posted by StealthRabbit View Post
Actuaries will continue to be in strong demand.

Accounting is probably the BEST business degree to get a decent foundation. Marketing pays the best, but accountants (honest ones) don't often pursue sales. Accounting is a good bridge to another HUGE growth job... senior (EXPERIENCED) investment advisers for retirees.

Engineering will continue to grow and even technical manufacturing skills are in seeing significant upward pay pressure.

As the truth comes out... (USA Education system has crippled the new job seekers) EXPERIENCED and competent workers become a premium. I was doing some work with HR resource planning this weekend. Employers SEEK someone who can walk in the door and GO TO WORK to make the company money AND to off-load owners / managers. They are finding that early retirees / older workers are just the ticket.

Several employers commented that younger workers have no basic skills (like reading a tape measure and answering the phone / placing and following through on ordering / Customer care.) There are also significant battles off personalities, that older workers know how to defuse/ignore.

Who would YOU hire to move your company forward?
I am a strong believer in a great work ethic/being willing to learn new technologies and skills on the job- then being able to grasp those items quickly. I have far more in common with people that are older than my age than those of a similar age to myself.

Last edited by GraniteStater; 07-18-2012 at 06:23 PM..
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Old 07-16-2012, 11:02 AM
 
Location: Woodinville
3,185 posts, read 4,350,065 times
Reputation: 6282
Quote:
Originally Posted by ram2 View Post
The problem is many companies use engineers to do everything but engineering. Many of the engineers I work with are really project managers. They send e-mails, setup meetings, update their red/yellow/green status spreadsheets, chase parts, chase suppliers, etc. However, when a detailed fluid flow analysis is required that work gets outsourced.
And it's usually wrong. Time and time again, companies outsource a bunch of technical work but when it comes back it's terrible and the company engineers spend significant amounts of time fixing it. This is what happens when engineering/manufacturing companies are run by nontechnical people.

The business person in charge sees that the outsourcing saved a lot of money, but then sees the engineers are overspending on the outsourced project. The business person generally ignores the engineers' case and comes down hard on them with a bevy of business-cliche "improvements" to the process (aka the buzzwords they learned in business school). It's taken at least a decade, but the nontechnical people running technical companies are finally figuring out the "you-get-what-you-pay-for" mentality and are starting to limit outsourcing to only the most basic tasks.
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Old 07-29-2012, 12:37 AM
 
18 posts, read 86,601 times
Reputation: 22
I work in the tech department of a large corporation that has tried the whole outsource most of our development to India thing. It did not turn out well and now the company has decided to stay with American based developers, but is having a hard time finding enough of them. So, we are now using American based contractors to supplement our in-house teams. We found that the Indian teams took much longer to complete projects and the projects that did get completed on time, ended up needing to be re-coded by one of our in-house teams.

A lot of companies in our area cannot find enough tech workers (specifically programmers and software engineers) to meet their needs. Couple that with drastically lower enrollment in tech related college degree programs, I foresee the need to tech workers growing at a hectic pass for the foreseeable future (barring any kind of complete nation wide financial meltdown)
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Old 07-29-2012, 08:43 PM
 
12,803 posts, read 16,550,661 times
Reputation: 8829
In decline, of course, STEM. The present exception, Petroleum Engineers. But they will be surplus once oil prices crash.

Growing: Spin doctors who try to convince us that those in power are doing a great job and deserve reelection, or that those in power are screwing up but the challenger will fix everything. Also financiers who convince those in power that it is a great use of public money to build new sports stadia. And, of course, players fortunate enough to get multimillion dollar contracts, as long as they are able to play.

Last edited by pvande55; 07-29-2012 at 08:44 PM.. Reason: Speling
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Old 08-02-2012, 03:46 PM
 
4,244 posts, read 4,716,897 times
Reputation: 2314
I think the Health Care industry has peaked and there will be an over supply of people and fewer jobs. There are many newly graduated Nurses that can't find work because they don't have experience. Unfortunately, we still are importing some 10,000 Nurses from foreign countries too.
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