U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-31-2012, 07:16 PM
 
Location: US Empire, Pac NW
5,008 posts, read 11,344,703 times
Reputation: 4125

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by DSOs View Post
^^Boeing is starting to sound like General Motors. Let’s see what happens in the next 5~10 years.


The FEDERAL GOV’T has been gigantically paying the States’ expenses since 2008. Why should a Kansas taxpayer contribute to this Washington State quasi-investment? I used to know the answer to this question; but now, I’m not so sure.

OT: US youth better get up to speed & start connecting the dots!
huh? I don't even know what you're trying to get at ... . I guess my only question is "What part of 'you have to sometimes spend money to make more money' don't you get?"

And I'm sure they'll be going strong in 5-10 years. Didn't you read my post? They've got at least a decade of work currently, and I bet you the sales department won't just give the whole market to Airbus for the next 10 years. Civilian aerospace is going strong and will continue to be for the foreseeable future.

You obviously don't own a business.

Quote:
If there are so many jobs open why don't companies train people?
Huh? I think I just proved that some companies ARE training people. And spending the money to do so. I know Master Lock just trained a bunch of people on their latest machines. I also know that CAT's been training people like crazy (and what do they get for it? a strike .... great .......).

As a general trend in this down cycle, the companies are spending money to train people. You just don't hear about it in the news a lot. And companies typically do attach strings to the training. Like at Boeing, you have to work for the company for a couple years or else they force you to repay some of the training. It's like that with the engineers too. They pay for a degree or classes, and in return you don't go anywhere for four years.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-31-2012, 09:48 PM
 
Location: State of Superior
8,730 posts, read 14,624,305 times
Reputation: 2851
The one thing that's not discussed much is American industry is buying machinery and capital goods like it's going out of style! My company is involved in the distribution of Industrial machinery.We have never been busier in the 40 years we have been in business. There are a shortage in truck drivers, and skilled workers to run these machines. As far as we are concerned, there is no recession at all. To top off what I have said, I live in the Northern Tier, where home prices never lost value. Locally we would have never known there was a recession. Business is back, all over town there are help wanted signs hanging in the windows, and we do not have the oil and gas other parts of the Norther Tier have. Soon ND will be the largest producer of natural gas. Oil also. It seems that if you are involved in any commodities business is booming. We have iron ore, now new is nickel, silver and gold mining .July was off, but orders are already solid for Aug.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-01-2012, 10:36 AM
 
1,730 posts, read 1,829,324 times
Reputation: 295
Quote:
Originally Posted by darstar View Post
We have never been busier in the 40 years we have been in business.
It seems that if you are involved in any commodities business is booming.
Unfortunately for most Americans - they are not even remotely close to commodities.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-01-2012, 12:09 PM
 
Location: State of Superior
8,730 posts, read 14,624,305 times
Reputation: 2851
Quote:
Originally Posted by russiaonline View Post
Unfortunately for most Americans - they are not even remotely close to commodities.
What a non thinking statement. If you believe what you just said then you have been living in a cave in some remote part of the world no ones ever heard of. Everyone that lives in the country is involved in Commodities in some way, and it effects their life much more than swome think. Examples at random; price of coffee and corn flakes.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-01-2012, 12:43 PM
 
1,730 posts, read 1,829,324 times
Reputation: 295
Quote:
Originally Posted by darstar View Post
Everyone that lives in the country is involved in Commodities in some way
First you were talking about people directly involved in commodities, now generally... The change is only because I'm Russian?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-01-2012, 03:58 PM
 
Location: State of Superior
8,730 posts, read 14,624,305 times
Reputation: 2851
Quote:
Originally Posted by russiaonline View Post
First you were talking about people directly involved in commodities, now generally... The change is only because I'm Russian?
I have nothing against you because you are Russian. We have several truck drivers/ owners, from Russia and they are great, hard working folk.
I am referring to YOUR statement about commodities . I do not know anyone who is on the Board of Trade in Chicago ether. I do not invest in Commodities any more, its too risky for me, and thats just me.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-01-2012, 04:08 PM
 
1,730 posts, read 1,829,324 times
Reputation: 295
Quote:
Originally Posted by darstar View Post
I am referring to YOUR statement about commodities .
Than I just wasn't clear enough - sorry.

Very few (% wise) Americans are directly involved in commodities. It's the same in Russia - people, close to oil, allum, whatever, earn really nice incomes.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-01-2012, 08:27 PM
 
Location: State of Superior
8,730 posts, read 14,624,305 times
Reputation: 2851
Quote:
Originally Posted by russiaonline View Post
Than I just wasn't clear enough - sorry.

Very few (% wise) Americans are directly involved in commodities. It's the same in Russia - people, close to oil, allum, whatever, earn really nice incomes.
Yes, you can do well in commodities , but it's risky business. Everyone I have know who traded on the Extchange has been broke several times. Some never come back, some do and can make a very nice living. The job is really bad for your health,the pressure cooker you live in. Many become addicted to all kinds of mind twisting drugs, and alcohol abuse. Go rent the movie " Trading Places", it's more fact than fiction.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-02-2012, 03:34 AM
 
1,730 posts, read 1,829,324 times
Reputation: 295
Quote:
Originally Posted by darstar View Post
Yes, you can do well in commodities , but it's risky business. Everyone I have know who traded on the Extchange has been broke several times. Some never come back, some do and can make a very nice living. The job is really bad for your health,the pressure cooker you live in. Many become addicted to all kinds of mind twisting drugs, and alcohol abuse. Go rent the movie " Trading Places", it's more fact than fiction.
I'm well aware about traders - but I wouldn't call them directly involved in commodities. People, who work for mining and processing companies are. Not sure, if they've got good wages in America.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-02-2012, 08:15 AM
 
Location: State of Superior
8,730 posts, read 14,624,305 times
Reputation: 2851
Quote:
Originally Posted by russiaonline View Post
I'm well aware about traders - but I wouldn't call them directly involved in commodities. People, who work for mining and processing companies are. Not sure, if they've got good wages in America.
We are getting off the topic , I think, but the commodities makers are where it starts, the farmer. It does no good if there has been a disastrous year ( and its here now ) drouth, floods, bugs , everything that contributes to a small yield from the fields. We can turn this around some, but in the end mother Nature has the upper hand, and always will.
AS to the meat packers, wages used to be good, today they are not so much. Its getting harder and harder to find people willing to work in these factories, this includes poultry pork, beef mostly. The big packers are where or near the production is these days. Then you have canned goods, truck farms, whatever they are called these days. Bottom line business will always be good, even in tough times, people have to eat, including the imported peoples that work in and under these conditions.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:35 PM.

© 2005-2021, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top