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Old 08-19-2012, 11:55 AM
 
Location: Planet Eaarth
8,955 posts, read 18,564,356 times
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How much we drive in important when you consider the economy as far as shopping goes or the number of people commuting to work.

Like they say......"Follow the money".....to see that Boomers are going to spend less and less driving and buying more stuff.

Older boomers help shift driving trends into reverse | Grist
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Old 08-22-2012, 09:53 AM
 
Location: Nesconset, NY
2,202 posts, read 3,739,650 times
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However, if one believes *how much* we drive has no bearing on the economy (except in gasoline consumption and auto maintenence) then we can talk about internet purchases, living closer to shopping and work, using mass transit, etc.

The article is obvious fluff (like an article about how rainwater seeks sea level). I guess when writers have nothing to write about they write about nothing.
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Old 08-29-2012, 07:09 PM
 
12,747 posts, read 16,286,998 times
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The older boomers are dying off anyway. A bigger issue is the younger people who are no longer interested in driving. Fewer even getting a drivers license.
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Old 08-29-2012, 07:43 PM
 
Location: US Empire, Pac NW
5,008 posts, read 11,239,561 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pvande55 View Post
The older boomers are dying off anyway. A bigger issue is the younger people who are no longer interested in driving. Fewer even getting a drivers license.
Why should they?

Driving sucks. Traffic. Maintenance. Gas. Headaches. All the while breathing in toxic fumes from other cars by the thousands and thousands every single day and getting fatter by sitting on a fat ass while stuck in traffic just so we can go to an oversized lot in a suburb with nothing to do but sit on that same fat ass and watch TV. It's a money sink in more ways than one and I'd argue destroying what little is left of real American culture.

Blah. No thanks. Gen Y has better things to do with their time. Whatever it is. It just isn't driving.

I drive because I have to, but I cut my commute from 1 hr each way to 10 minutes, and am thinking of riding my bike and teaching my kids the virtues of riding a bike and getting exercise.

I do enjoy driving when I have an open road going to a destination that is sufficiently removed from civilization. Otherwise, I take the train or fly and take the bus.
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Old 08-30-2012, 05:53 AM
 
Location: Nesconset, NY
2,202 posts, read 3,739,650 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pvande55 View Post
The older boomers are dying off anyway. A bigger issue is the younger people who are no longer interested in driving. Fewer even getting a drivers license.
While true it's a situation related to their current age. Younger people are more likely to live in urbanized areas where an auto isn't necessary. However, I'm betting, once they get married and start having families thier attitudes, like every generation before them, will begin to change.

Hopefully, however, they will continue to encourage a new way of development which puts places to live and work in close proximity to each other (co-housing movement).
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Old 08-30-2012, 10:13 PM
 
Location: US Empire, Pac NW
5,008 posts, read 11,239,561 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LIGuy1202 View Post
While true it's a situation related to their current age. Younger people are more likely to live in urbanized areas where an auto isn't necessary. However, I'm betting, once they get married and start having families thier attitudes, like every generation before them, will begin to change.

Hopefully, however, they will continue to encourage a new way of development which puts places to live and work in close proximity to each other (co-housing movement).
I haven't been around long enough to know whether that is true or not ...

But at least here in Seattle, every young couple with kids I know are moving back to the cities. They want their kids to grow up with culture and experience the city.

Me personally I had enough of the city when I lived there LOL! So I moved to the burbs (and I work in the burbs anyway so it is OK).
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Old 08-31-2012, 07:57 AM
 
982 posts, read 1,457,549 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LIGuy1202 View Post
However, I'm betting, once they get married and start having families thier attitudes, like every generation before them, will begin to change.
I am not so sure about that. Automobiles are prohibitively expensive to the point that I've never owned one even though I am nearing 27 at this point. I do not see that relenting at all.
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Old 09-01-2012, 02:49 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
35,806 posts, read 35,613,869 times
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Be careful about where you are being pushed/nudged by various websites and articles. There is a shadow movement to make the suburbs disappear and be incorporated into the large cities so the cities can tap into the wealth of the suburbs.
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Old 09-01-2012, 08:40 AM
 
Location: Great State of Texas
86,068 posts, read 76,191,803 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pvande55 View Post
The older boomers are dying off anyway. A bigger issue is the younger people who are no longer interested in driving. Fewer even getting a drivers license.
The "older boomers" just turned 65 two years ago. It's the Silent generation that you might be thinking of. The height of boomer births was 1957 so we're on the uphill side of a generation entering retirement.
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Old 09-01-2012, 05:41 PM
 
5,361 posts, read 10,258,344 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
Be careful about where you are being pushed/nudged by various websites and articles. There is a shadow movement to make the suburbs disappear and be incorporated into the large cities so the cities can tap into the wealth of the suburbs.
It is called Economic Reality.

If that is the "shadow" of which you speak, it is real.

We do not have the fantasy "growth," money, energy and wealth we (USA) made-believe we did.
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