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Old 11-10-2012, 03:09 AM
 
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I have friends in boston, nyc, philadelphia, and other smaller cities (spokane wa and portland, OR) and I am in seattle.

I'm doing fine in seattle, i can afford rent, im in my twenties, but my friends who are in boston and nyc are still living with their parents or living with roomates. even those who live in government housing there are doing ok, but sooner or later they have to move out or get married. in nyc, a studio is 1500 in Brooklyn. in boston, a studio is 1,600. How on earth can they even launch, if my friends make 10 an hour (better than min wage) its still about 1,600 a month after taxes.


I have visited all the cities mentioned and have lived in a few of them for a short term. the smaller cities, they are doing ok, while the expensive cities its either make very good money or just struggle. my friend in NYC pays 800 a month for a room while I pay 750 a month for a small 2 br.

my question is, how do you see the big cities in the next 10 years? I think even in seattle its going to get to a point where its going to be too expensive, its expensive now but i can sense its creeping up (small increase in rent/food/gas prices yearly). I think the quality of live is slowly going down.

Last edited by civic94; 11-10-2012 at 03:19 AM..
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Old 11-10-2012, 09:11 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,017 posts, read 18,863,621 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by civic94 View Post
I have friends in boston, nyc, philadelphia, and other smaller cities (spokane wa and portland, OR) and I am in seattle.

I'm doing fine in seattle, i can afford rent, im in my twenties, but my friends who are in boston and nyc are still living with their parents or living with roomates. even those who live in government housing there are doing ok, but sooner or later they have to move out or get married. in nyc, a studio is 1500 in Brooklyn. in boston, a studio is 1,600. How on earth can they even launch, if my friends make 10 an hour (better than min wage) its still about 1,600 a month after taxes.


I have visited all the cities mentioned and have lived in a few of them for a short term. the smaller cities, they are doing ok, while the expensive cities its either make very good money or just struggle. my friend in NYC pays 800 a month for a room while I pay 750 a month for a small 2 br.

my question is, how do you see the big cities in the next 10 years? I think even in seattle its going to get to a point where its going to be too expensive, its expensive now but i can sense its creeping up (small increase in rent/food/gas prices yearly). I think the quality of live is slowly going down.
Your friends in NYC and Boston make $10 per hour?????? If that's all they can manage, they need to get the hell out of NYC and Boston or make serious efforts to acquire some skills. When one's situation is untenable, one needs to take action to change that situation. Yes, the quality of life is going down for many folks - has been since 2007/2008. It went down, not slowly, but pretty rapidly for many. That is the new reality of world economics. I do not believe restoring the status quo ante is in the cards.
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Old 11-10-2012, 03:12 PM
 
48,508 posts, read 88,440,292 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by civic94 View Post
I have friends in boston, nyc, philadelphia, and other smaller cities (spokane wa and portland, OR) and I am in seattle.

I'm doing fine in seattle, i can afford rent, im in my twenties, but my friends who are in boston and nyc are still living with their parents or living with roomates. even those who live in government housing there are doing ok, but sooner or later they have to move out or get married. in nyc, a studio is 1500 in Brooklyn. in boston, a studio is 1,600. How on earth can they even launch, if my friends make 10 an hour (better than min wage) its still about 1,600 a month after taxes.


I have visited all the cities mentioned and have lived in a few of them for a short term. the smaller cities, they are doing ok, while the expensive cities its either make very good money or just struggle. my friend in NYC pays 800 a month for a room while I pay 750 a month for a small 2 br.

my question is, how do you see the big cities in the next 10 years? I think even in seattle its going to get to a point where its going to be too expensive, its expensive now but i can sense its creeping up (small increase in rent/food/gas prices yearly). I think the quality of live is slowly going down.
Basicaqlly unless they are more sucessful they don't.It no different than why one of my neighbors left UK;he could get on what he calls the homeownership ltter but would always be in aq small flat or in governamnt housing,Its realy a recult of higher and higher cost from higher and higher taxes on those who pay actual taxes. The niceest part of any city now are always the haven of the more wealthy. InSF most wh work there at lessor jobs either rent rooms or they live and drive i traffic to egt to work, My neice does that and sonner or later says she will seek other empoyemnt. I rememebr stayig at a Colorado resot town and wanderig tat the price now any of the workers in the shop afforded to live there.I learned where most lives. miles down the roadway mostly i trailer parks if they had wifes and in rooms of they were single.That was 1995.
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Old 11-10-2012, 03:57 PM
 
1,020 posts, read 3,023,702 times
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Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
Your friends in NYC and Boston make $10 per hour?????? If that's all they can manage, they need to get the hell out of NYC and Boston or make serious efforts to acquire some skills. When one's situation is untenable, one needs to take action to change that situation. Yes, the quality of life is going down for many folks - has been since 2007/2008. It went down, not slowly, but pretty rapidly for many. That is the new reality of world economics. I do not believe restoring the status quo ante is in the cards.

I have to say most of my friends have at least a BA, but not everyone can get a good job. if your only option is to bus tables, its still money.

and the ones who make about 80k or so, they are still living in tiny places in nyc trying to save up for a house and saving up for marriage. it just seems that the quality of life is really poor. I was born ad raised in boston, and have friends in nyc. I would love to live in these 2 places, but it seems like the only ones that dont struggle are the rich and the poor getting goverment housing. like i said before, my friends who got goverment housing since they were kids, and the family stayed there for decades, their parents can survive, if any rent increase for the whole area is affecting people there, it doesnt affect them. BUT, once the kids are grown up and needs to move out/get married, thats when it hits hard.
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Old 11-10-2012, 04:48 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
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Originally Posted by civic94 View Post
I have to say most of my friends have at least a BA, but not everyone can get a good job. if your only option is to bus tables, its still money.
A lot depends on what the BA is in. If it's Art History, then it's worthless and they might as well use it to wipe their behinds. I do admire them for bussing tables rather than doing nothing. But if they have a BA and bussing tables is the only thing available to them in New York City or in Boston, then I still maintain they are in the wrong places. One can be too tied to a particular city for one's own good.
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Old 11-10-2012, 04:56 PM
 
1,020 posts, read 3,023,702 times
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Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
A lot depends on what the BA is in. If it's Art History, then it's worthless and they might as well use it to wipe their behinds. I do admire them for bussing tables rather than doing nothing. But if they have a BA and bussing tables is the only thing available to them in New York City or in Boston, then I still maintain they are in the wrong places. One can be too tied to a particular city for one's own good.

its mostly in accounting, finance, a couple of them have mba's in engineering, while a couple have useless degrees. anyways its just that they are raised there, all their family is there, they have a tough decision to stay or leave the area or struggle. I still have tons of family in boston, but i just cant survive there unless I get goverment housing. paying close to 2000 a month for a 1 bedroom is insane, I just cant justify that unless I have a really good job lined up.

Everytime I go to a expensive city (vancouver bc, san fran, nyc, boston) and I eat at a nice resturaunt (im not a big spender, but if I am at a new place, i have to have 1 luxury and at least enjoy good food in that area that my area cant produce) I see workers at the resturaunt working, even if its zagat rated and a famous place, I just have the sense of feeling that the workers are struggling really hard outside of the resturaunt. it just feels sad that I'm paying big money for food, while the workers might make a tiny bit over min wage.

I dont want to rely on the goverment, even if i get it and dont struggle, when my kids grow up, they will not launch if wages are still the same but rent has maybe double.
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Old 11-10-2012, 07:02 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
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I think anyone making less than half the average income is going to struggle anywhere, even moreso in an expensive area such as NYC or San Francisco. They just have to accept that they're poor which can be hard for someone who came from a middle-class background and did what society told them to do -- go to college rather than finding a job out of high school or going into a trade/apprenticeship program. But that's just the way it is... do what the poor do and move to the Bronx with roommates or stay dependent on their parents.
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Old 11-10-2012, 07:24 PM
 
Location: Metro Detroit, Michigan
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Big cities boast the best opportunity for employment. Young folks in search of work will naturally gravitate where the work can be found. Of course, rent and real estate prices are a reflection of supply and demand. I would expect them to stay high. That's the cost you pay to live somewhere that offers an better prospects of employment. There are always jobs in a given area that don't pay much. I'm sure retail and restaurant workers all across the country would tell the same story. This is the pay, take it or leave it. No matter what, there is always a segment of the population who struggle to make enough to survive, but that's certainly not unique to the city. If I had to be poor though, I would much rather be poor in a rural community than a city setting.
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Old 11-11-2012, 07:44 AM
 
Location: Podunk, Cackalacky
300 posts, read 603,593 times
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Do you consider living with roommates in NYC failure to launch? Given the cost of rent there, it's pretty much a necessity for most young people. From what I saw, people who don't earn enough to live alone either have roommates or live with a partner. Either way, it's sharing costs.

In answer to your question, I think continued gentrification is what you'll see in the big cities. The attractive neighborhoods that are centrally located will creep up in price as more yuppies move in, and those who make $10/hour will move farther and farther out to afford their rent. Yes, it sucks to be poor in a big city. But then, it's harder to find work in a small one. Conundrum!
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Old 11-11-2012, 08:32 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,661 posts, read 78,404,244 times
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Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
Your friends in NYC and Boston make $10 per hour?????? If that's all they can manage, they need to get the hell out of NYC and Boston or make serious efforts to acquire some skills.

How does one "acquire some skills" overnight? It takes a minimum of two years to "acquire skills" (at least, legitimate ones) that translate into measurably higher income. Paying rent for a room for two years in NYC while acquiring skills would cost nearly a half a million dollars.

The American media has portrayed life in NYC as being a glamorous, fun place, where ordinary people with HS or BA in Humanities have casual but challenging and creative jobs that allow them to ride around in taxis and buy groceries at the local deli and sit around and psychobabble with their beautiful friends all day and always have their hair and nails done and live in a clean tidy flat with lots of windows and high ceilings and a well-stocked bar and buy their fashionable clothes at retail and have plenty of free time to spend days in line to buy movie tickets or cellphones. I shudder to think what it is really like.

Last edited by jtur88; 11-11-2012 at 08:45 AM..
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