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Old 05-20-2020, 03:05 PM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
28,415 posts, read 67,516,806 times
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This is kind of fun, but I do not know whether I qualify:



1. I do not own a large flat screen TV at least by some standards. We have a 36" or 42 flat screen in our bedroom. Our back parlor has a really big projection TV (maybe 52") but it has not been used in five or more years. It is hidden in an antique tiger oak armoire which we rarely open anymroe. We do not have a piano, but we have one of those shopping mall mini organs from the 1970s in the basement (inherited from wife's grandmother). We did have a cool antique piano when we lived in California. We do have lots of books, but we are getting rid of them.

2. You had me on the first part of this sentence, but I do not know all of my cousins. The ones I know maybe half went to college. The other half got pregnant or went to jail in high school (or both). My father was the first of his family line to attend college. Dad grew up on a farm in Illinois. He did not know that it was normal to have electricity and indoor plumbing until he arrived at college. I am not sure on my mother's side, but I think she was the first as well. Her sister died at 16 and he mom and dad definitely did not go to college. Grandpa painted pig houses and previously drove a wooden schoolbus. The kids paid to ride and sometimes gave him chickens instead of money.

3. We mostly like road trips. We stop at both toursity and non--touristy destinations. Otherwise we like rustic site camping. I do like to try to get a taste of local life when we travel. Usually by talking to people that I meet. Often they will end up inviting us to their home or to things that are going on in the local community, and we get a really good taste of local life. to me, that is what travel is for. why else would you travel? We live on an island covered in forests and bike trails and with an international water way (Detroit river) in our front yard. Other than visiting family, why go anywhere else if not to see how people live in other places? (Well maybe to go hiking or camping in awesome canyons, or mountains or similar places.)

4. I do listen to NPR even though I pretty much hate it becuase it is so biased. However there is not much else offered around here for talk or news. I also listen to a heavy metal station and 1980s new wave/punk rock. No sure where that puts me.

5. Got me here. This is the primary thing I do outside of work. Mostly Kiwanis and church stuff. Doing things for other people is more fun or at least more fulfilling than doing things for myself.

6. I hate golf and suck at it. I do not understand why anyone finds it interesting to play or watch (feel the same about fishing). I do like throwing atlatl and also knives and axes. That is kind of like golf. Sort of. Well maybe not too much like it.



7. Hummus and couscous yes. But I do not eat them on purpose. What are those other things? Shashimi is some kind of raw fish right? I do not eat any of those things if I can avoid it. Not sure what rissoto is. Cheese? I like Jarlsburgh cheese - that is pretty snooty I think. Does jarlesburgh cheese replace rissoto? (Is rissoto even cheese? I think it is.).

8. I mostly hate foreign films. My wife loves a French film called Diva. I found it tolerable. I will say I enjoyed one on netflix recently where a pissed off dad who owend a luumber yard killed all the bad guys one by one in order to protect his daughter. I think it was dubbed, but I do not remember. Not sure where it is from, but not the USA. It was well done and very intense. We pretty-much always use subtitles whether a show is dubbed or not. Since the subtitles come up so far behind the speaking, if you miss something someone said, you can wait for it to appear on the screen and read it. Does Crocodile Dundee count as a foreign film? That was a pretty funny. Also "The Gods Must be Crazy" That was foreign too I think. It was one of my favorites for a while.

9.Sadly, that is spot on. When people introduce me, they almost always say "he is a lawyer." I hate it. Why cant they say "he can sitck 3 out of 5 axes in the bullseye 90% of the time." No one likes lawyers, but accuracy with throwing axes - that is impressive. Still if someone asks what I do I also usually say I am a lawyer or I work in construction. I never say I throw axes and atlatl really well, or i like to serve food at soup kitchens and meet people from different lifestyles. I am a left handed Dad. President of Kiwanis. There are a lot of better identitied I oculd have used other than "Lawyer." Ick.



10. We did some of that. Not to the extent that many of our firends did. Mostly I told the kids if they did not join somehting in high school, I would put them in something. That is how one of my sons ended up in rowing and ultimately became a national champion. He never had a rowing tutopr though (but we bought him a $2000 used single shell (boat) when he was in hgih school). Our kids did have piano lessons and voice lessons hen they were younger. They also went to some math learning game place during a few summers. And our trumpet player had private trumpet lessons once he started to excel and outpaced what they were teaching him in school.


11. Depends on the kid. I expected them to perform at the level I knew they were capabale of at the time. Sometimes I was happy if they managed a C. Sometimes I was disappointed with an A-. We tried to get them to take the SAT/ACT prep course. Some did, some did not. We did not have a tutor for those tests, but we did have a high school kid tutor some of our kids in subjects where they were struggling. It was some program through the school. Honors seniors would tutor younger kids in their special subject for about $10 an hour I think.

12. I love being outside. Wilderness is better. Boats are best. I hike, bike and kayak a lot. I have some nice hiking boots my daughter bought for me at her work (she works at Salvation Army). They only cost her about $12, but were likely expensive when new. I do not have a 'bag." If I need to carry stuff I usually use one of my kids old school backpacks. We have a huge family tent from wallmart (which I had to have someone pick up for me because i will not go inside a Wallmart). It supposedly sleeps 12 or 18 people but is really only suitable for 4-6. It cost about $250. It is a nice sturdy ent sand sets up in about 90 seconds. We also have a cool small tent that looks like a Teepee. I bought it on the internet for about $50. It is neat looking but it takes two people to set up and the pole in the middle inside is a PIA, plus it requires an absurd amount of stakes and strings. because of the pole it is difficult to get two people into it comfortably (Ithink the box says it sleeps 6). Still it works, so we use it sometimes. Don't buy a tent on the internet becuase it looks cool.

13. I wear my sunglasses at night. . . . (actually I wear perscritpion sunglasses, but I lost them so now I do not wear sunglasses at all. I just squint). When I had my prescription sunglasses I sometimes wore them in non sunny conditions becuase i could not find my clear prescription sunglasses. I also once had those glasses that get dark when you go outside and light when you go inside. I hated them though. Happy day when I lost them.

14.2009 Dodge Ram (with 190,000 miles) I am quite proud of it. Wife drives a chevy Express (230,000 miles). However my fun car is a 1973 Jensen healey - that is foreign (British) but it is broken and has not run in ten years so maybe does not count. I did drive a Volvo V70 wagon for a year when my Camaro died. My brother gave me the volvo for $1800 and I needed a car quickly. It had 350,000 miles on it, but it was still a foreign car. It had a bazillion buttons inside. A reviewer described it as "appearing as if a button monster vomited all over the cockpit while on the way home from a bar." Buttons everywhere! Some of them I never figured out what they did. It was a pretty cool car. I have to admit to liking it nearly half as much as I loved the Camaro. So, perhaps I am artly guilty of the foreign car thing.



15. I try to stay healthy. In shape is not really possible. I abused my body when oyunger and have bad knees, bad back and now I am fat becuase I cannot exercise very much. I sometimes go with my wife as a guest to the health club she belongs to. Not a facny one though, it costs $23 a month. My Bicycle cost $389 which was a lot for a bike in 1992. I am trying to buy my wife a Six-three-zero comfort ease bicycle. It is $429 if I can find one. that is pretty outrageously expensive. I also once owned a bicycle that was worth $3800. At least that is what the inusrance gave me when it was stolen. I paid $250 for it in a used bike store. Still, I did have an uber expensive bike once. So, probably guilty of number 15.

16. I thought i hated art, but then I visited the DIA. Now I have to admit I love art at least a little bit. I love theater. I prefer to perform or direct over watching, but I prefer watching theater over movies. We rarely go to the fancy $80 a seat type shows, but community theater and even high school is awesome. Three of my kids have performed ro sung classical music and one is now a Jazz trumpet player so yes, I have to attend all of those and I enjoy them. I like Jazz better than Classical. but I will rock out to the 1812 overture or Flight of the bumblebees at times.

17. I put money in my 401K and then it becomes more money. I have learned not to look at the ballance and not to try to move the funds around. Just leave them there and ignore them. hopefully when time for retirement comes there will be a lot in there. Looking at the balance can be very stressful. Especially this year. So I just dont look. What am I going to do about it?



18. Our house is cray big. It does have some green features like a tankless water heater, but I put it in as a luxury item, not for green purposes. On the other hand, the entire house is recycled, so that is pretty green. The kitchen is pretty big. we had five kids and they alwasy had a number of guests. We needed a big kitchen. Now it is too big for us and silly, but it made sense at the time.

19. Not by those words, but i do love such places. however I prefer less crowded places with more character like Detroit, Cleveland, Austin, Denver, Marquette, Ann Arbor. etc. I really dislike sterile soulless places like Irvine California.

20. You are corect on the first part, i avoid chains fo rht most part. But I hate IKEA. It is hell on earth to me. I do like Target and Mejier. I thought Barnes & Noble was out of bnusiness. I never really liked big bookstores but wife and kids loved them. I have been to Trader Joes in the past and it seemed OK kind of wierd stuff though. It was a good place to collect signatures when we were trying to recall a corrupt school baord memebr in California. There are no trader joes near us now, so I am not sure whether I woudl go to one or not. their big thing was two buck chuck and I no longer dirnk wine. The others I am not sure I have heard of or been to. . . .oh wait, Chipolte - that it eh aplce that makes people sick a lot right? My son loves that chain.

21. I wanted my children to love and serve God - FAIL. I wanted them to be happy - FAIL (mostly). I did encourage them to be creative and that was a mistake, it landed them in low paying jobs and turned them into left wing extremists. Still I love them and I am proud of them.

22. We have hosted large barabque parties and we hosted family get togethers at Christmas and thanksgiving and some birthdays. We may have had indoor dinner party for people who were nto family once, possibly twice. I am not sure. We do have sperate rooms. our hosue was built in 1836 and 1850 and 1868 back when open floor plan was not a thing, So yes, our rooms are sperated into individual rooms. We even have a front parlor and a back parlor (living room and familiy room in todays terminology).

23. I do read history and good fiction. I also have a collections of _______ for dummies books (mostly different sports). I guess those qualify as non-fiction that you described. I cannot name many authors. I would never drop their names. Someone might ask me what they wrote and I would not have any clue. it would be embarrassing. Besides at the parties mentioned above, I am usually a bit drunk, so I owld likely mis-pronouce the names.


24. We did nto buy them toys very often. freinds and relatives bought so many tosy for them we had to ask them to stop. they did have all the hand held and Television connected games machines that there were. I rencetly dug out all the game counsoles and game cartridges laying in our basement and I suddenly realized where all that massive amount of money went back when I was making bookoo bucks. We must have 450K retail in various electronic game thingies in our basmenet. they now have a value of about $12.

25. I once knew a lot abot wine. We also kept a bar in our home int he 1980s and 1990s. my wife no longer drinks and I only drink scotch or an occaisional quality beer, but only once in a while and never at home unless we are having a party. Alcohol is too fattening.





So where do I fit. Am I upper middle class?
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Old 05-20-2020, 04:47 PM
 
4,913 posts, read 2,060,555 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tvdxer View Post
1. You own a large, flat-screen TV, but it's NOT in the living room. Your living room perhaps contains books or a grand piano.

2. Your father went to college, your mother most likely went to college, all your brothers and sisters and cousins except the black sheep of the extended family attended at least some college, and your family's college education stretches back generations (except if you're newly upper middle class).

3. When traveling, you prefer to choose destinations that are "not touristy" and give an "authentic" taste of local life.

4. You listen to NPR in the car.

5. If 35 or older, you participate in the community through being on the board of some local chapter of an organization, or extensively volunteering for it with your valuable free time.

6. If you're male, you golf, if not for the love of it than because of social pressure.

7. You are familiar with the following food items, even if you're from flyover country: hummus, couscous, sashimi, banh mi, and risotto.

8. You sometimes watch foreign films, and consider dubbing an abomination - you would much prefer subtitles.

9. You strongly identify with your career.

10. From preschool or a younger age, you enroll your children in a multitude of extracurricular activities - piano lessons, ballet, tennis, water polo, etc.

11. Your children's academic success is paramount to you, and you set very high standards. If they get a "C" in a class, either their teacher or the child has much to answer for. When in high school, you make sure they take lots of AP courses, and unless they are the brightest of the bunch, you hire a SAT tutor. Deep down inside, there's a burning desire to boast that your children went to a high-ranked university, or at least NOT one of the lesser state colleges, and certainly not a community college.

12. You love "nature", the "outdoors", and the "wilderness", and like tread softly through the woods in your $250 hiking boots with your $250 bag and perhaps sleep in your $1,000 tent, or if a northern clime, in your expensive cross-country skis. It can suck losing iPhone connectivity, though.

13. If you're a female, you don sunglasses even when it isn't that sunny out.

14. You drive only foreign cars, preferably Mercedes-Benz or BMW.

15. Staying in shape and in style is a priority to you. You have a gym membership, perhaps in addition to a road bike you paid a pretty penny for.

16. You like, or feign to like, the fine arts, and have attended a classical music concert, opera, or play at least once or twice (going on a field trip as a kid not included). You consider it perfectly natural to listen to classical music or jazz radio and patronize art-house cinema.

17. Planning for your retirement is important, and you fully understand such things as 401Ks and Roth IRAs. You might even have a financial advisor. You watch the stock market and probably participate in it somehow.

18. If you're 40 or older, your house measures over 2,500 square feet in area. If you designed it, you made sure to implement "green" features. The kitchen is spacious. Especially if in a southwestern state, you probably have some paid help cleaning it, perhaps full-time.

19. You probably don't live in one, unless you are in your 20s or early 30s, but you love "authentic" and "vibrant" urban spaces such as those found in New York City, San Francisco, and Portland, with plentiful pedestrian traffic, ample public transportation, narrow streets, and storefronts that are right up to the sidewalk rather than behind a sea of parking.

20. You don't like the homogenization of the United States through chain stores and franchises, but deep down you love Trader Joe's, REI, Whole Foods, Barnes and Noble, Chipotle, Macy's, IKEA, Target, and Fogo de Chao.

21. You want your children to be creative, imaginative, think out-of-the-box, and tolerant of differences. You perhaps even enjoy when they question one of your rules.

22. You regularly go to or host dinner parties. You have separate kitchen and dining rooms.

23. You have read, for leisure, at least one non-fiction title that does not fall into the category of self-help, automotive/technical, or religious books in the past year, and are familiar with authors, whom you often name-drop at above parties.

24. When your children are young, intellectual stimulation and creative expression is the primary goal of your toy-buying practices. No or limited cheap electronic playthings or radio-controlled monster trucks.

25. You have a rather refined taste in alcohol. You are familiar with local breweries, micro-brews, >$10 / bottle wines, and refined cocktails with non-obscene names.

20/25 - 80% upper middle class.
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Old 05-20-2020, 07:37 PM
 
Location: Erie, PA
3,544 posts, read 1,767,532 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tvdxer View Post

3. When traveling, you prefer to choose destinations that are "not touristy" and give an "authentic" taste of local life.

5. If 35 or older, you participate in the community through being on the board of some local chapter of an organization, or extensively volunteering for it with your valuable free time.

7. You are familiar with the following food items, even if you're from flyover country: hummus, couscous, sashimi, banh mi, and risotto.

8. You sometimes watch foreign films, and consider dubbing an abomination - you would much prefer subtitles.

12. You love "nature", the "outdoors", and the "wilderness", and like tread softly through the woods in your $250 hiking boots with your $250 bag and perhaps sleep in your $1,000 tent, or if a northern clime, in your expensive cross-country skis. It can suck losing iPhone connectivity, though.

13. If you're a female, you don sunglasses even when it isn't that sunny out.

20. You don't like the homogenization of the United States through chain stores and franchises, but deep down you love Trader Joe's, REI, Whole Foods, Barnes and Noble, Chipotle, Macy's, IKEA, Target, and Fogo de Chao.

21. You want your children to be creative, imaginative, think out-of-the-box, and tolerant of differences. You perhaps even enjoy when they question one of your rules.

23. You have read, for leisure, at least one non-fiction title that does not fall into the category of self-help, automotive/technical, or religious books in the past year, and are familiar with authors, whom you often name-drop at above parties.

24. When your children are young, intellectual stimulation and creative expression is the primary goal of your toy-buying practices. No or limited cheap electronic playthings or radio-controlled monster trucks.
10/25 and that kind of scares me since I come from a lower working class background and have apparently turned into a snob

I don't like touristy or crowded places--it's a lot more fun to visit the places that are less well-known.

I let myself be talked into being on the board on a couple of local organizations. What free time?!

In my defense I don't have $250 hiking boots and wear sunglasses when it is bright because my eyes are very sensitive to even bright overcast light.

I read non-fiction books because I am a nerd but don't name drop and am not into parties.

I don't care about any of the other chains except Barnes and Noble.

Guilty of buying my kid the intellectual stimulation toys when she was younger but also bought her the fun stuff like a 1:12 Hummer.
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Old 05-23-2020, 01:23 PM
 
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I wouldn't call people upper middle class unless they were pretty rich and can afford anything. I think the higher end of middle class, not upper middle class, is the people I see around all the time - the techies, the lawyers, and the human resources managers who are married, so they have a decent household income.

In San Francisco, the very bottom of middle class is about $120k for a household of 4. And families that make $400k can still struggle and don't live luxurious lives. They have lots of expenses. This is true in other richer parts of the Bay Area, like Palo Alto.

It's incredibly snooty here these days. SF is where fresh new crops of college kids always move to for their high-paying jobs. I feel incredibly left out and seen with disdain, as a native San Franciscan. I don't dress like them, and I don't have their arrogant attitude. The old SF that I grew up in was way more humble, grungy, and not very aesthetic or fashion-oriented.

But yeah, my tastes completely fall into the OP's UMC, even though I'm actually very poor now. Since high school, I've had deep, geeky, artsy, and obscure tastes in anything.

I'll go to any new hipster cafe with aesthetic minimalist decor and teddy bear latte art. I've gone to book readings for experimental novels. I've regularly gone to lectures at universities on various geeky topics. I follow politics very closely, and I'm left-leaning but not far left. My favorite Bronte novel is Villette - not the most well-known and popular. I thought Shakespeare in Love sucks. When I think of an amazing band from back in the day, I think of Slint, or for a more popular one, My Bloody Valentine. I go deep and in depth into history for places that I care about. I understand the snootiness of Metafilter. Satie is too light for me, and I think he's overrated. Going to a panoramic night photography workshop in Iceland is my idea of travel. I have a band T-shirt from a mid-2000s band that played the vox, with an LGBT lead singer. I though Oakland was uncool by 2011. I love Etsy-like jewelry that's lovingly hand-crafted and unique. I was very interested in the idea of Warren and Pete. I'm Yang Gang. I love anything new and novel. I'm constantly looking for the next big thing. I love the idea of multifaceted art spaces. My ideal yoga session is one at a multifaceted art space with Burning Man LED installations.

So...it's all extremely UMC according to the OP's description, but I grew up humbly middle class, and I'm currently poor.

Last edited by MyCitay; 05-23-2020 at 01:37 PM..
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Old 05-24-2020, 04:00 AM
 
Location: D.C.
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What a lot of the upper middle class (which I am a part of) don’t seem to grasp, is that you can’t borrow wealth. I am in this category because I work my butt off, do probably 70% of my projects myself, and don’t buy into the social circle scene of appearances. I know many around me who act as though they’re the upper crust. Can’t tell you about something they did or have without telling you how much it cost. Drives me nuts when I know they owe more on their home than they did when they bought it 15 years ago, cars are leased, credit cards are maxed. They literally own nothing.
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Old 05-24-2020, 07:45 AM
 
Location: D.C.
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Let me clarify after a cup of coffee. I am lucky to be in the category, but have made some difficult decisions and hard steps to get to it (moved around a lot). I am surrounded by those who are over leveraged and they tend to look down on me because I do my work to maintain and improve my home (mostly). I’m the only one who actually mows his own yard. I wash my own cars. I paint my own interior rooms, etc.. I also tend to buy my cars and keep them long after paying off the note. I bought a fixer-upper from a former aol.com guy who did just the opposite. Racked up $1,000 monthly bar tabs at the country club bar, spent every dime he had, then the aol.com music stopped and his house went to crap. I picked it off for about $0.70 on the dollar and have lifted it back up mostly in my own. I’ve been here 5 years, and amazingly so, I have 3x’s the equity in it than my upper-middle class neighbors who’ve been here for 15-20 years. I have nice things, but I don’t have $2,500 in lease payments for two new cars. I spread my own mulch at $400 instead of $2,500 for someone else. I now my own yard instead of $3,000 for a season. That sort of stuff. And because of that, I have one of the lowest mortgages in my area, two paid off nice cars, and I sleep well at night. I do need to shift my focus towards retirement in 20 years more than I have, but getting to the bridge to cross soon enough.

Moral of the story - appearances are misleading for many in this financial segment of the economy, and it usually doesn’t go much past the front door.
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Old 05-24-2020, 11:02 AM
 
Location: State of Transition
85,975 posts, read 79,159,832 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MyCitay View Post
I found this thread by Googling, and I'd like to revive this, though the last comment was from 6 years ago. The OP's post as well as the New England woman's applies to me. I grew up very, very middle class, and nowhere near upper middle by anyone's standards.

I'm Asian American, though. Asian Americans do tend to be more "bougie," cultured, and sophisticated in interests because our parents often came as grad students, we read and consume a lot of media, we value education, and we tend to live in the coastal elitist areas. I'm from San Francisco, so the pretense and eclectic, artsy, non-mainstream vibe is everywhere here. This vibe is often not recognized when it's in an Asian, though, because that set of interests and tastes is known as a white people thing. Asians are generally dismissed and relegated to robots with no taste or sophistication, when Asians usually think in much more deep, creative, intuitive, and nuanced ways than others.

The OP's comment and other comments were written in 2013-14, so that applies more to people from back then. On sites with lots of teens and 20-somethings these days, they can come from that same cultured area but have an entirely different set of interests and worldview.

People can be upper middle class from more rural and suburban areas that are Trump Country and have a completely different set of interests and worldview.
Ah, here we are. Inevitably the necro-threads like this (from 2013, people), are revived by a new member. Thx for the insight into upper-cruster Asian thought & life ways, though.


OP points are full of cliches that don't apply to many people. For example, the golf point. I never knew any UMC (upper-middle-class) people who played golf, male or female.

NPR, really? So-o-o, whoever came up with those points never knew any Republican UMC's? Seriously? *credibility crash*

I'm not even going to bother with the rest of this fluff piece.
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Old 05-24-2020, 08:14 PM
 
1,241 posts, read 388,650 times
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1. You own a large, flat-screen TV, but it's NOT in the living room. Your living room perhaps contains books or a grand piano.

True. There is a large, flat-screen TV in the family room and a piano in the living room, but the books are in the family room (and the kitchen, the hallway, the guest bedroom and both offices).

2. Your father went to college, your mother most likely went to college, all your brothers and sisters and cousins except the black sheep of the extended family attended at least some college, and your family's college education stretches back generations (except if you're newly upper middle class).

Both my father and my mother have graduate degrees. But they were the first generation in both of their families to attend college (as far as I know). My sister and all my cousins have at least some college education. The black sheep dropped out of a not so good school.

3. When traveling, you prefer to choose destinations that are "not touristy" and give an "authentic" taste of local life.

When we travel, we choose locations based on where my husband’s work takes him. Or we do exotic birding trips. Or both. We get an “authentic“ taste of local life in the process because we get to know local guides fairly well. (They are private guides. We don’t do tours.)

4. You listen to NPR in the car. Yes, but I also listen to stations that broadcast in Spanish (to work on my Spanish).

5. If 35 or older, you participate in the community through being on the board of some local chapter of an organization, or extensively volunteering for it with your valuable free time.

I used to for a while, then realized that my ideal of retirement didn’t involve a lot of meetings.

6. If you're male, you golf, if not for the love of it than because of social pressure. My DH doesn’t golf.

7. You are familiar with the following food items, even if you're from flyover country: hummus, couscous, sashimi, banh mi, and risotto. Everything except “bahn mi.” That was a new one.

8. You sometimes watch foreign films, and consider dubbing an abomination - you would much prefer subtitles. I watch foreign films in the original language without the subtitles.

9. You strongly identify with your career. I did before I realized I didn’t any more and retired early.

10. From preschool or a younger age, you enroll your children in a multitude of extracurricular activities - piano lessons, ballet, tennis, water polo, etc. No children.

11. Your children's academic success is paramount to you, and you set very high standards. If they get a "C" in a class, either their teacher or the child has much to answer for. When in high school, you make sure they take lots of AP courses, and unless they are the brightest of the bunch, you hire a SAT tutor. Deep down inside, there's a burning desire to boast that your children went to a high-ranked university, or at least NOT one of the lesser state colleges, and certainly not a community college.

No children.

12. You love "nature", the "outdoors", and the "wilderness", and like tread softly through the woods in your $250 hiking boots with your $250 bag and perhaps sleep in your $1,000 tent, or if a northern clime, in your expensive cross-country skis. It can suck losing iPhone connectivity, though.

We love the outdoors and have spent way to much on lenses, binoculars, scopes and other equipment.

13. If you're a female, you don sunglasses even when it isn't that sunny out. Nope.

14. You drive only foreign cars, preferably Mercedes-Benz or BMW. Yes, but Volvo and Toyota.

15. Staying in shape and in style is a priority to you. You have a gym membership, perhaps in addition to a road bike you paid a pretty penny for. I absolutely friggin detest gyms, but I do care a lot about staying in shape. I power walk outside and have exercise equipment at home.

16. You like, or feign to like, the fine arts, and have attended a classical music concert, opera, or play at least once or twice (going on a field trip as a kid not included). You consider it perfectly natural to listen to classical music or jazz radio and patronize art-house cinema. I love the arts. No feigning about it. I wrote a doctoral dissertation on a sub-genre of opera.

17. Planning for your retirement is important, and you fully understand such things as 401Ks and Roth IRAs. You might even have a financial advisor. You watch the stock market and probably participate in it somehow. Yes. We have a financial advisor and participate in the stock market.

18. If you're 40 or older, your house measures over 2,500 square feet in area. If you designed it, you made sure to implement "green" features. The kitchen is spacious. Especially if in a southwestern state, you probably have some paid help cleaning it, perhaps full-time. Our house is slightly smaller than that. Our kitchen is not huge.

19. You probably don't live in one, unless you are in your 20s or early 30s, but you love "authentic" and "vibrant" urban spaces such as those found in New York City, San Francisco, and Portland, with plentiful pedestrian traffic, ample public transportation, narrow streets, and storefronts that are right up to the sidewalk rather than behind a sea of parking. Yes, I love them, but unfortunately my DH could care less.

20. You don't like the homogenization of the United States through chain stores and franchises, but deep down you love Trader Joe's, REI, Whole Foods, Barnes and Noble, Chipotle, Macy's, IKEA, Target, and Fogo de Chao. Yes, I do not like the homogenization of which you speak, but I friggin’ hate Trader Joe’s. B & N is so vanilla. Macy’s? Blech. Are they still a going concern, BTW? I have never set foot in an IKEA. What is Fogo de Chao? On the other hand, I love Whole Foods.

21. You want your children to be creative, imaginative, think out-of-the-box, and tolerant of differences. You perhaps even enjoy when they question one of your rules. No children.

22. You regularly go to or host dinner parties. You have separate kitchen and dining rooms. We aren’t that social.

23. You have read, for leisure, at least one non-fiction title that does not fall into the category of self-help, automotive/technical, or religious books in the past year, and are familiar with authors, whom you often name-drop at above parties. Yes.

24. When your children are young, intellectual stimulation and creative expression is the primary goal of your toy-buying practices. No or limited cheap electronic playthings or radio-controlled monster trucks. No children.

25. You have a rather refined taste in alcohol. You are familiar with local breweries, micro-brews, >$10 / bottle wines, and refined cocktails with non-obscene names.[/quote]
We do not drink.
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Old 05-24-2020, 10:22 PM
 
Location: Portal to the Pacific
6,650 posts, read 6,051,535 times
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I have an upper middle class income and net worth, but a mostly middle class lifestyle.

This means our income qualifies us as the former and our spending, the latter. Nothing much else to say about it...
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Old 05-25-2020, 10:48 AM
 
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So I'm piling on with some joking around.

1. You own a large, flat-screen TV, but it's NOT in the living room. Your living room perhaps contains books or a grand piano.

Watching TV at all is a negative.

2. Your father went to college, your mother most likely went to college, all your brothers and sisters and cousins except the black sheep of the extended family attended at least some college, and your family's college education stretches back generations (except if you're newly upper middle class).

Yes! College is a good way to put off entering the family business.

3. When traveling, you prefer to choose destinations that are "not touristy" and give an "authentic" taste of local life.

The last thing I want is a taste of local life. Paris is worth a mass.

4. You listen to NPR in the car.

No. We don't turn on the radio. You should pay attention to driving. Better people don't risk their lives.

5. If 35 or older, you participate in the community through being on the board of some local chapter of an organization, or extensively volunteering for it with your valuable free time.

The main thing is you don't actually directly do anything that would put you in contact with the receivers of charity.

6. If you're male, you golf, if not for the love of it than because of social pressure.

If you're male, golfing is what you tell your wife when you go see your mistress.
Oh, sorry, that's upper class.


7. You are familiar with the following food items, even if you're from flyover country: hummus, couscous, sashimi, banh mi, and risotto.

There's much better food than that stuff

8. You sometimes watch foreign films, and consider dubbing an abomination - you would much prefer subtitles.

Why? We're multilingual.

9. You strongly identify with your career.

Sounds like an employee.

10. From preschool or a younger age, you enroll your children in a multitude of extracurricular activities - piano lessons, ballet, tennis, water polo, etc.

If that's what they want. But not if they don't want. Making your kids do that is striving.

11. Your children's academic success is paramount to you, and you set very high standards. If they get a "C" in a class, either their teacher or the child has much to answer for. When in high school, you make sure they take lots of AP courses, and unless they are the brightest of the bunch, you hire a SAT tutor. Deep down inside, there's a burning desire to boast that your children went to a high-ranked university, or at least NOT one of the lesser state colleges, and certainly not a community college.

If you have good genes, you don't have to worry about that. Besides, our Senator has assured us a slot at Annapolis if he or she (the child) manages to stay out of prison.

12. You love "nature", the "outdoors", and the "wilderness", and like tread softly through the woods in your $250 hiking boots with your $250 bag and perhaps sleep in your $1,000 tent, or if a northern clime, in your expensive cross-country skis. It can suck losing iPhone connectivity, though.

Why would we do that? Nature is right outside our cabin.

13. If you're a female, you don sunglasses even when it isn't that sunny out.

Nuh-uh. You have learned enough to not ever tell a female what she should or should not be wearing.

14. You drive only foreign cars, preferably Mercedes-Benz or BMW.

We live in the city, so we walk everywhere or take the subway.

15. Staying in shape and in style is a priority to you. You have a gym membership, perhaps in addition to a road bike you paid a pretty penny for.

A bike? We don't risk our lives in order to wear appalling clothes. And no, we stay in shape by having an active life.

16. You like, or feign to like, the fine arts, and have attended a classical music concert, opera, or play at least once or twice (going on a field trip as a kid not included). You consider it perfectly natural to listen to classical music or jazz radio and patronize art-house cinema.

Some of it, yes, but we never go see anything because other people are.

17. Planning for your retirement is important, and you fully understand such things as 401Ks and Roth IRAs. You might even have a financial advisor. You watch the stock market and probably participate in it somehow.

Lol. Sounds like poor people or employees. Retirement planning should consist of managing what part of the inheritance goes to your descendants' trust fund and what part goes to charity.

18. If you're 40 or older, your house measures over 2,500 square feet in area. If you designed it, you made sure to implement "green" features. The kitchen is spacious. Especially if in a southwestern state, you probably have some paid help cleaning it, perhaps full-time.

Where did that come from?

19. You probably don't live in one, unless you are in your 20s or early 30s, but you love "authentic" and "vibrant" urban spaces such as those found in New York City, San Francisco, and Portland, with plentiful pedestrian traffic, ample public transportation, narrow streets, and storefronts that are right up to the sidewalk rather than behind a sea of parking.


We also briefly wondered what a person meant when they used the word authentic with quotes.


20. You don't like the homogenization of the United States through chain stores and franchises, but deep down you love Trader Joe's, REI, Whole Foods, Barnes and Noble, Chipotle, Macy's, IKEA, Target, and Fogo de Chao.

Shudder, No. We go to stores where the owner knows us.

21. You want your children to be creative, imaginative, think out-of-the-box, and tolerant of differences. You perhaps even enjoy when they question one of your rules.

Yes on the first sentence, no on the second. One doesn't get to the top by tolerating insolence.

22. You regularly go to or host dinner parties. You have separate kitchen and dining rooms.

Yep. Free food is the best food, no matter how much money you have.

23. You have read, for leisure, at least one non-fiction title that does not fall into the category of self-help, automotive/technical, or religious books in the past year, and are familiar with authors, whom you often name-drop at above parties.

Minimum is a book a month. You should not be watching television at all if you aren't reading a good book a month.

24. When your children are young, intellectual stimulation and creative expression is the primary goal of your toy-buying practices. No or limited cheap electronic playthings or radio-controlled monster trucks.
After they've done their chores the they can make some toy if that's what they want.
If the kids are still alive at 5:00, I've done my job.


25. You have a rather refined taste in alcohol. You are familiar with local breweries, micro-brews, >$10 / bottle wines, and refined cocktails with non-obscene names.
All you need to know is how to prepare a proper martini.
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