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Old 07-26-2013, 01:31 PM
 
Location: San Diego California
6,797 posts, read 6,773,807 times
Reputation: 5185

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Hidden History: According to Benjamin Franklin, the real reason for the Revolutionary War has been hid from you | Peak Prosperity

This is a great article that shows how little things change over the years.
The problems caused by Central Banking are the same problems caused over 200 years ago when the revolution in America began. The results have also been the same.
It is through the examination of history, that we today can more clearly understand the problems that confront us.
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Old 07-26-2013, 01:47 PM
 
4,130 posts, read 4,173,398 times
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I have talked with mental patients with more evidence for their beliefs and a better grasp on reality then the author (pretty much the entire blog as well). This fanciful fiction of secret societies and "real history" without evidence isn't even a very good story. National Treasure did a better job and I couldn't drink enough to make it half way through that movie.

I guess I can't disprove it...any more then I can disprove invisible dragons, bigfoot, and shapeshifting lizards exist. When kids get older than about 7 they realize that they should believe in things that can be proven to be true, not anything that can't be proven false. An adult that believes this kind of junk should be ashamed of themselves for thinking this is true.
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Old 07-26-2013, 01:50 PM
 
Location: TX
795 posts, read 1,305,757 times
Reputation: 784
That's rule #1 of the conspiracy theory playbook. "Well, then prove me wrong!"

...
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Old 07-26-2013, 02:05 PM
 
Location: San Diego California
6,797 posts, read 6,773,807 times
Reputation: 5185
Quote:
Originally Posted by EmeraldCityWanderer View Post
I have talked with mental patients with more evidence for their beliefs and a better grasp on reality then the author (pretty much the entire blog as well). This fanciful fiction of secret societies and "real history" without evidence isn't even a very good story. National Treasure did a better job and I couldn't drink enough to make it half way through that movie.

I guess I can't disprove it...any more then I can disprove invisible dragons, bigfoot, and shapeshifting lizards exist. When kids get older than about 7 they realize that they should believe in things that can be proven to be true, not anything that can't be proven false. An adult that believes this kind of junk should be ashamed of themselves for thinking this is true.
Actually it is quite easy to prove or disprove history, it is all written down. The majority of the article are quotes from the men who were making the history at the time. That is what I like about it.
The fact is that central banking is at the very root of our history from day one.
Of course bankers do not want anyone to read that history as it does not show them in a favorable light.
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Old 07-26-2013, 02:12 PM
 
Location: TX
795 posts, read 1,305,757 times
Reputation: 784
Rule #2 - "If you don't believe this, you are naive and brainwashed."

Rule #3 - "Correlation = causation."
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Old 07-26-2013, 02:20 PM
 
1,924 posts, read 2,162,476 times
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Did anyone remember that Franklin was a printer? Would it surprise anyone to learn that his personal wealth was well advanced by becoming the official printer of the paper currency of Pennsylvania? And then of New Jersey, Delaware, and Maryland?

Meanwhile, credit financed the settlement of the colonies. Nobody came here except on borrowed money. Credit financed the Revolutionary War. Awash in debt, it took the new nation until 1835 to pay it all back. Where does credit come from?
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Old 07-26-2013, 02:22 PM
 
4,130 posts, read 4,173,398 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jimhcom View Post
Actually it is quite easy to prove or disprove history, it is all written down. The majority of the article are quotes from the men who were making the history at the time. That is what I like about it.
The fact is that central banking is at the very root of our history from day one.
Of course bankers do not want anyone to read that history as it does not show them in a favorable light.
Quote mining is a fallacy, it is not evidence. A pretty old one at that. It's a way of lying by using an appeal to authority. I don't really care what bankers like or don't like, but I take a firm stance on lying weather I like some one or not.
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Old 07-26-2013, 02:36 PM
 
Location: TX
795 posts, read 1,305,757 times
Reputation: 784
Quote:
Originally Posted by oaktonite View Post
Did anyone remember that Franklin was a printer? Would it surprise anyone to learn that his personal wealth was well advanced by becoming the official printer of the paper currency of Pennsylvania? And then of New Jersey, Delaware, and Maryland?

Meanwhile, credit financed the settlement of the colonies. Nobody came here except on borrowed money. Credit financed the Revolutionary War. Awash in debt, it took the new nation until 1835 to pay it all back. Where does credit come from?
It's worth noting that shortly after Andrew Jackson paid off the national debt, a major banking crisis ensued. With no debt, government reserves were not available to the private banks. They were forced to either relax lending standards with unsafe reserve ratios, or stop lending entirely with safe reserves. Either way, it was lose-lose.
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Old 07-26-2013, 02:49 PM
 
Location: San Diego California
6,797 posts, read 6,773,807 times
Reputation: 5185
Quote:
Originally Posted by EmeraldCityWanderer View Post
Quote mining is a fallacy, it is not evidence. A pretty old one at that. It's a way of lying by using an appeal to authority. I don't really care what bankers like or don't like, but I take a firm stance on lying weather I like some one or not.
What you are actually talking about but are probably not well enough educated to know is Logical Fallacies. Philosophers distinguish between two types of argument: deductive and inductive. For each type of argument, there is a different understanding of what counts as a fallacy. Arguments consist of premises, inferences, and conclusions. Arguments containing bad inferences, i.e. inferences where the premises don’t give adequate support for the conclusion drawn, can certainly be called fallacious.
To use a quote is not a fallacy, unless the quote fails to prove the point you are trying to establish.
If the point you are trying to establish is that people at some point in history were faced with problems, and that point is verified by the quote, then it is not a fallacy.
So the next time you want to call someone a liar, try having some idea of what you are talking about.
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Old 07-26-2013, 03:09 PM
 
4,130 posts, read 4,173,398 times
Reputation: 3041
Quote:
Originally Posted by jimhcom View Post
What you are actually talking about but are probably not well enough educated to know is Logical Fallacies. Philosophers distinguish between two types of argument: deductive and inductive. For each type of argument, there is a different understanding of what counts as a fallacy. Arguments consist of premises, inferences, and conclusions. Arguments containing bad inferences, i.e. inferences where the premises don’t give adequate support for the conclusion drawn, can certainly be called fallacious.
To use a quote is not a fallacy, unless the quote fails to prove the point you are trying to establish.
If the point you are trying to establish is that people at some point in history were faced with problems, and that point is verified by the quote, then it is not a fallacy.
So the next time you want to call someone a liar, try having some idea of what you are talking about.
An arguement that is only based on quotes from authority figures is not evidence. The truth stands on what can be proven to be true, not the merits of what people think about it. At the time it was happening or not.

If some one says that something happened and that can be verfied through evidence, then they are shown to be true. What you have in the article is a claim that the author presented, and went looking for a vague quote (with no other evidence) by a figure of the time...then stated their claim was true.

The difference is that some one claims what was happening in NASA during the time of the moon landing, we can find documents and others that say the same thing, it is true. What the author did was start with a premise, like the moon landing was faked, and found some one living at the same time that said something that supports his premise by snipping out certain bits (nothing else)...then declared his premise to be true. The first one is reality, the second one is not truth.

This is basic logic.

If some one lies, I call them a liar. I am not really interested if it offends the liars sensabilities. If people want to not be called a liar then they shouldn't lie. Complaining doesn't correct the problem, or help them look better in anyone else's eyes.
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