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Old 08-11-2013, 08:08 PM
 
15,795 posts, read 6,858,902 times
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It used to be that you finished college, get a degree, got a job and the money you made so e hoe balanced out and you paid off the loan and things went on. Now student loan is becoming a big topic and the biggest culprit is one, easy loans is making more people go to college and so govt should stop subsidizing student loan. Two, colleges are charging too much tuition.

Why isn't anyone talking about low wages and salaries? As a percentage of GDP, while corporate profits have been rising salaries are declining and are at their lowest level since the Depression, 1929. Is it any wonder young people are struggling?
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Old 08-12-2013, 12:48 AM
 
24,488 posts, read 40,983,168 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cb2008 View Post
It used to be that you finished college, get a degree, got a job and the money you made so e hoe balanced out and you paid off the loan and things went on. Now student loan is becoming a big topic and the biggest culprit is one, easy loans is making more people go to college and so govt should stop subsidizing student loan.
I agree.
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Originally Posted by cb2008 View Post
Two, colleges are charging too much tuition.
Says who? Just because college was really cheap for a few decades doesn't mean that tuition shouldn't return to normal rates. Keep in mind that historically, only those who showed decent merit (3.8 gpa for example) and/or had wealth attended college.
Quote:
Originally Posted by cb2008 View Post

Why isn't anyone talking about low wages and salaries? As a percentage of GDP, while corporate profits have been rising salaries are declining and are at their lowest level since the Depression, 1929. Is it any wonder young people are struggling?
I suppose it doesn't help that everyone and their mother is taking on debt to attend college whether or not they should.
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Old 08-12-2013, 01:02 AM
 
125 posts, read 166,661 times
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Originally Posted by cb2008 View Post
Is it any wonder young people are struggling?
Petition for a bailout. Or do as I suggest and pay someone to do your bidding. The taxpayer bailout will be yours if you collectively scream loud enough. The middle class will be the ones that pay for it. They will hoot and holler at first, but the ignorant masses located in the middle class will be distracted by something else by the time the bailout is in the works and ready to be rolled out.
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Old 08-12-2013, 01:25 AM
 
Location: Carmichael, CA
2,410 posts, read 4,415,840 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cb2008 View Post
It used to be that you finished college, get a degree, got a job and the money you made so e hoe balanced out and you paid off the loan and things went on. Now student loan is becoming a big topic and the biggest culprit is one, easy loans is making more people go to college and so govt should stop subsidizing student loan. Two, colleges are charging too much tuition.
The colleges are charging more and more tuition because the government is subsidizing the loans. Get the government out of the college loan business and the colleges will magically figure out that in order to attract students, they need to have affordable fees.

I know someone who's borrowed $80k in student loans to get a degree that will at most get her a $40k job--assuming she can find one.

And yes, though it hurts to say this--since the government started this whole thing with all the grants/loans, they should end it by forgiving a good part of the inflated loans. Maybe have people pay back the amount that the classes should have costed.
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Old 08-12-2013, 01:29 AM
 
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Originally Posted by cb73 View Post
And yes, though it hurts to say this--since the government started this whole thing with all the grants/loans, they should end it by forgiving a good part of the inflated loans. Maybe have people pay back the amount that the classes should have costed.
Absolutely not. These students chose expensive routes and should be held responsible for it. They should have attended Cooper Union or UPenn on scholarship if they thought tuition was high.
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Old 08-12-2013, 11:25 AM
 
Location: Carmichael, CA
2,410 posts, read 4,415,840 times
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Originally Posted by NJBest View Post
Absolutely not. These students chose expensive routes and should be held responsible for it.
Yes. Like my (temporary) neighbor who bought a $300k house on his WalMart checker salary and "didn't know" that the true payments, after the 2-year teaser, would be more than his entire salary. I generally have an expectation that people take responsiblity for their actions and read the fine print. Yet, he was repeatedly "helped" by the government until the foreclosure.

But the young people are being bombarded with information that they have to attend college, they have to get loans, "it will all work out". And they're coming out into a jobless world with no hope of getting ahead. On tv last night a guy was talking about it taking an average of 20 to 30 years to pay back student loans, depending on the major and the job market.

I think when it all comes to a boil, the government will bail them all out, just like they did the homeowners, who are still being bailed out.
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Old 08-12-2013, 12:35 PM
 
9,639 posts, read 5,972,704 times
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Originally Posted by NJBest View Post
Says who? Just because college was really cheap for a few decades doesn't mean that tuition shouldn't return to normal rates. Keep in mind that historically, only those who showed decent merit (3.8 gpa for example) and/or had wealth attended college.
Cost of college has far outpaced inflation.

A lot of it has to do with worthless administration. Nobody ever looks at them, the focus is always on the teachers salaries. My last year of school they cut $500,000 in student services, teachers were in year 2 of no contract, but administration got their 3% raises and hired new people.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cb73 View Post
But the young people are being bombarded with information that they have to attend college, they have to get loans, "it will all work out". And they're coming out into a jobless world with no hope of getting ahead. On tv last night a guy was talking about it taking an average of 20 to 30 years to pay back student loans, depending on the major and the job market.

I think when it all comes to a boil, the government will bail them all out, just like they did the homeowners, who are still being bailed out.
The value of college has also been cheapened. All this private "online" schools or the big box ones. ie Devry University. They're just chasing the easy loans people can get.
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Old 08-12-2013, 03:07 PM
 
Location: North of Canada, but not the Arctic
20,864 posts, read 19,328,298 times
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...and yet we still have politicians (I won't mention any names) making speeches at colleges about how the federal government must continue to subsidize college education so that they can get more votes, er, I mean so graduates can get high-paying jobs.
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Old 08-12-2013, 09:26 PM
 
24,488 posts, read 40,983,168 times
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Originally Posted by cb73 View Post
Yes. Like my (temporary) neighbor who bought a $300k house on his WalMart checker salary and "didn't know" that the true payments, after the 2-year teaser, would be more than his entire salary. I generally have an expectation that people take responsiblity for their actions and read the fine print. Yet, he was repeatedly "helped" by the government until the foreclosure.

But the young people are being bombarded with information that they have to attend college, they have to get loans, "it will all work out". And they're coming out into a jobless world with no hope of getting ahead. On tv last night a guy was talking about it taking an average of 20 to 30 years to pay back student loans, depending on the major and the job market.

I think when it all comes to a boil, the government will bail them all out, just like they did the homeowners, who are still being bailed out.
Most college students aren't young anymore. They are 18 years oldish. Unless their parents failed them miserably (which, sadly, happens way too often), they know exactly what they are getting into. Let's not make up excuses. If the students and parents cared about education, they would have attained scholarships or gone to schools that offer funding (like cooper union).
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Old 08-12-2013, 09:27 PM
 
24,488 posts, read 40,983,168 times
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Originally Posted by LordSquidworth View Post
Cost of college has far outpaced inflation.

A lot of it has to do with worthless administration. Nobody ever looks at them, the focus is always on the teachers salaries. My last year of school they cut $500,000 in student services, teachers were in year 2 of no contract, but administration got their 3% raises and hired new people.
Yes, the cost of college has outpaced inflation... recently. But you conveniently leave out the fact that college was extremely cheap between WWII and the late 90s. There was a significant amount of catching up to do.
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