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Old 03-06-2008, 07:15 AM
 
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What states have prerequisite for future economical growth and explanation why?
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Old 03-06-2008, 03:03 PM
 
Location: Papillion
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I don't understand your question. Can you rephrase it?
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Old 03-07-2008, 12:17 AM
 
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I believe the question must be something to the effect that the original poster would like to know what US States are ready to prosper and grow in these tough economic times and beyond. If that is the case, then the poster should realize that many of the 50 US states are in position to do so with the right state and local level Government leadership. That said, no one has a crystal ball and indeed there are national and global influencers which cannot be understated.

The right way to conduct this analysis would be to look at where the most significant concentrations of business & job growth are occurring today. Combined with low personal and business taxes, low-crime, great infrastructure, and very few "acts of god" (natural disasters), and you have a recipe for success.
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Old 03-07-2008, 04:41 AM
 
Location: western East Roman Empire
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I agree with mbuszu that it's a complex question, but that growth is possible with the right mix of policies and other factors.

But, in my view, monetary and credit policy is a major factor that has been crippling the productive base of the country as a whole. That's one negative factor in the mix of policies at the national level.

One approach could be to look at sectors, and their international linkages, if any, and then, if feasible, decide what state to locate in, based on the right mix of local policies and some of the other factors mentioned.

Perhaps the original poster can tell us why he asked the question and provide some specifics on the context for it.
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Old 03-07-2008, 05:47 AM
 
47 posts, read 125,355 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mbuszu View Post
If that is the case, then the poster should realize that many of the 50 US states are in position to do so with the right state and local level Government leadership.
I do believe that private businesses make more positive improvement to region, than government controlled business if theres any at all.

Yes grow can occur anywhere, but its hard to make grow in desert for example, i mean some other factors like good geographical position for something, recently found minerals that were unknown to present in region etc. this factors i think have more importance than other.

Why asking, i making a research for local (non english speaking) university.

Last edited by ProperMan; 03-07-2008 at 05:56 AM..
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Old 03-07-2008, 05:58 AM
 
47 posts, read 125,355 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mbuszu View Post
The right way to conduct this analysis would be to look at where the most significant concentrations of business & job growth are occurring today.
How can this be done?
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Old 03-07-2008, 06:56 AM
 
20,793 posts, read 56,582,990 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ProperMan View Post
I do believe that private businesses make more positive improvement to region, than government controlled business if theres any at all.

Yes grow can occur anywhere, but its hard to make grow in desert for example, i mean some other factors like good geographical position for something, recently found minerals that were unknown to present in region etc. this factors i think have more importance than other.

Why asking, i making a research for local (non english speaking) university.

I think that you might lack some basic understanding about the US and how private enterprise works. There really aren't any government controlled businesses. There are some businesses that have some government regulations but the government doesn't really run businesses here like in some countries.

I am not sure I know exactly what you are asking either.
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Old 03-07-2008, 07:00 AM
 
Location: Papillion
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bale002 View Post
I agree with mbuszu that it's a complex question, but that growth is possible with the right mix of policies and other factors.

But, in my view, monetary and credit policy is a major factor that has been crippling the productive base of the country as a whole. That's one negative factor in the mix of policies at the national level.

One approach could be to look at sectors, and their international linkages, if any, and then, if feasible, decide what state to locate in, based on the right mix of local policies and some of the other factors mentioned.

Perhaps the original poster can tell us why he asked the question and provide some specifics on the context for it.
With that clarification I rank Nebraska as a top state that is ready. Good workforce, lots of higher education opportunities, generally been insulated from the prime-lending issues, lots of higher education opportunities, good political leadership at state/county/local levels, been a leader in Rail (e.g. Union Pacific), Telecom (e.g. Call Centers, Card Processing, Phone, etc) , Finance (e.g. Berkshire) , Consumer Products (e.g. Conagra), Insurance (e.g. Mutual of Omaha), and Medical (e.g. UNMC).

By many different measures Nebraska is a great place to be from an economic (personal and business) perspective.
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Old 03-07-2008, 09:04 AM
 
Location: western East Roman Empire
8,067 posts, read 11,860,855 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mbuszu
The right way to conduct this analysis would be to look at where the most significant concentrations of business & job growth are occurring today.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ProperMan View Post
How can this be done?
A good start may be the US Department of Commerce, Office of Statistics (or some such). They often provide the basic data your are looking for broken down on a state by state basis.

Also research the commerce departments (under various names) for each of the 50 states.

But, again, it is not clear exactly what you are looking for.

I think - and it may be wishful thinking - that future growth will be based on advances in energy technology rather than the discovery of new minerals, etc.

For example, The Economist this week is running an article (also on line) about battery technology and its application to the motor vehicle. Some of the cutting-edge companies are located in various US states, ranging from California to Maryland, I believe, and they have patented some inventions.

Having said that, geography certainly plays a part: for example, Houston and Miami are important ports for trade with South America. But mineral discoveries too: as oil prices increase, exploration and extraction technologies may improve and be applied to new areas in the Gulf of Mexico, for example, maybe the oil shales in Canada, underground deposits in the continental US (Colorado?).

There are many, many possibilities.
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Old 03-07-2008, 09:39 AM
 
Location: Boise, ID
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As one who recently decided to move my company to a different state I can say there are several factors in considering an area. Some of those for us were: capable workforce to hire from, proximity to repair personnel for our equipment, business-friendly regulations, business-friendly local government, proximity to major highway for shipping product, low corporate and personal tax rates, and proximity to a decent sized airport.

We are currently in California. While it meets many of our needs, the regulatory environment and attitude of the state towards businesses are pretty bad.

We considered Nevada, Utah, and Idaho. I know some of our suppliers have moved to Arizona. I would say that all four of those states are in a good position for growth. We finally settled on Idaho with personal reasons tipping the scale for us.

I have also seen North Carolina listed at or near the top on best states to do business lists. However, I have never looked into it personally.
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